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Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family

Description: "The Byrd Williams Collection at the University of North Texas contains more than 10,000 prints and 300,000 negatives, accumulated by four generations of Texas photographers, all named Byrd Moore Williams. Beginning in the 1880s in Gainesville, the four Byrds photographed customers in their studios, urban landscapes, crime scenes, Pancho Villa's soldiers, televangelists, and whatever aroused their unpredictable and wide-ranging curiosity. When Byrd IV sat down to choose a selection from this dizzying array, he came face to face with the nature of mortality and memory, his own and his family's. In some cases these photos are the only evidence remaining that someone lived and breathed on this earth"--Amazon. The contents include: Foreword : One bright thread / Roy Flukinger -- Photographs : The family album -- Landscape -- Postcard -- The Great Depression -- Studio -- People -- Non-people -- Violence and religion in Texas -- Night -- Afterword : Palimpsest / Anne Wilkes Tucker.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: November 2016
Creator: Williams, Byrd M., IV
Partner: UNT Press

[Studio Portrait being take of Student]

Description: Photograph of a female student's portrait being taken in the Shaw Studio in 1942. In the image the student sits in front of a backdrop with a flash light to her left and a reflector on her right. A large-format camera stands to the right of the frame facing the student with the photographer holding the release button.
Date: 1942
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

"Documenting" East Texas: Spirit of Place in the Photography of Keith Carter

Description: This thesis examines similarities in photographs made by the contemporary photographer Keith Carter and photographers active with the Farm Security Administration during the 1930s. Stylistically and in function, works by Carter and these photographers comment on social and cultural values of a region. This thesis demonstrates that many of Carter's black and white photographs continue, contribute to, and expand traditions in American documentary photography established in the 1930s. These traditions include the representation of a specific geographic place that evokes the spirit of a time and place, and the ability to communicate to a viewer certain social conditions and values related to such a place.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Lutz, Cullen Clark
Partner: UNT Libraries

Charreada: Mexican Rodeo in Texas

Description: El Charro, or man on horseback, has represented the spirit of independent Mexico since he played an important role in the 1821 revolution. He is the Mexican version of the American cowboy, only much older, arising from the ranch culture first brought to Mexico by the Spanish. The Charreada is his rodeo, his opportunity to show off both his skills with rope and horse and his decorative, elegant costume. It is at the center of Mexican heritage and self-image, a source of mythology and genuine heroes that has been brought to Texas by immigrants. And since 1989, it has included women, charras, who participate in elaborate and difficult riding formations.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hambric, Julia; Woolley, Bryan; Abernethy, Francis Edward & Rendon, Al
Partner: UNT Press

An Instrument Employing a Coronal Discharge for the Determination of Droplet-Size Distribution in Clouds

Description: A flight instrument that uses electric means for measuring the droplet-size distribution in above-freezing clouds has been devised and given preliminary evaluation in flight. An electric charge is placed on the droplets and they are separated aerodynamically according to their mass. Because the charge placed on the droplets is a. function of the droplet size, the size spectrum can 'be determined by measurement of the charge deposited on cylinders of several different sizes placed to intercept the charged droplets. An expression for the rate of charge acquisition by a water droplet in a field of coronal discharge is derived. The results obtained in flight with an instrument based on the method described indicate that continuous records of droplet-size spectrum variations in clouds can be obtained. The experimental instrument was used to evaluate the method and was not refined to the extent necessary for obtaining conclusive meteorological data. The desirable features of an instrument based on the method described are (i) The instrument can be used in clouds with temperatures above freezing; (2) the size and the shape of the cylinders do not change during the exposure time; (3) the readings are instantaneous and continuous; (4) the available sensitivity permits the study of variations in cloud structures of less than 200 feet in extent.
Date: September 1951
Creator: Brun, Rinaldo J.; Levine, Joseph & Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

This Side of the Border: The Mexican Revolution through the Lens of American Photographer Otis A. Aultman

Description: This presentation discusses the Mexican Revolution, as seen through the camera lens of American photographer Otis A. Aultman. In 2009, El Paso Public Library's Archivist Marta Estrada received a grant from the UNT Libraries to digitize a portion of their Otis Aultman Photograph Collection and add it to The Portal to Texas History. El Paso Public Library's collection on the Portal consists of more than 500 digitized glass plate negative photographs that documents the Mexican Revolution through the eyes of Mr. Aultman, many of which have not been seen for a century.
Date: February 17, 2011
Creator: Carlisle, Tara
Partner: UNT Libraries

Emeritus College Presentation Lecture Notes

Description: These lecture notes accompany a presentation titled 'This Side of the Border: The Mexican Revolution through the Lens of American Photographer Otis Aultman.' The lecture notes discuss the fifty-two presentation slides with the topics and details.
Date: February 17, 2011
Creator: Carlisle, Tara
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Myth of Emmetropia: Perception in Rhetorical Studies

Description: This thesis sets up the problem of sight in a visual society, with the aim to answer how the visual makes itself known. The conversation starts on visuality, and where there are gaps in understanding. The first of two case studies examines the absence of sight, or blindness, both literal and figurative. Through a study of blind photographers and their work, this chapter examines the nature of perception, and how biological blindness may influence and inform our understanding of figurative blindness. The second case study examines what the improvement of damaged sight has to say about the rhetorical nature of images. This chapter examines various means of improving sight, using literal improvements to sight to understand figurative improvements in vision and perception. The fourth and final chapter seeks to sum up what has been discovered about the rhetorical nature of sight through the ends of the spectrum of sight.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Kaszynski, Elizabeth
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Joe Clark and Ron Unternahrer Toss Up a Target Egg for Slingshot Milligan]

Description: Photograph of Joe Clark and Ron Unternahrer tossing up a target egg for Slingshot Milligan to shoot. In the image both men are wearing towels around their necks from the splattered egg matter. The two men are practicing the height of the egg being tossed in the air for the photograph they are making where Milligan shoots the egg with a Milligan Special slingshot. Narrative by Junebug Clark: This is truly a behind the scenes or a how it was done photo. At 25 paces that egg is a pretty small moving target to hit. To add to the difficulty the object was also to miss the photographer, the assistant and also the camera which is directly behind the trajectory of the egg and in the path of the stainless steel ball bearing used for target shooting. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 8001-2
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Statue of The Thinker]

Description: Photograph of The Thinker statue by Auguste Rodin. In the image the statue, being distorted by a Hypergon Lens, is centered in the frame with building in the background. Joe Clark, the photographer, was testing out the new lens.
Date: February 10, 1963
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot John Milligan Unleashing His Milligan Special]

Description: Photograph of Slingshot John Milligan Unleashing His Milligan Special. This photo appears on page 83 of the Life Magazine listed below. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 6335-83
Date: March 22, 1952
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Beagles on Rabbit Hunt for Gardner Advertising Company]

Description: Photograph of two Beagles running to catch a rabbit. The image was created for the Gardner Advertising Company by Joe Clark. In the image the two Beagles, blurred from their motion fill the frame as they run towards a rabbit off frame. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 8035-0001-14
Date: May 2, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot John Milligan Scrambling an Egg]

Description: Photograph of an egg in mid-explosion from a slingshot ball. In the image John Milligan stands in the background holding the slingshot in position while the exploded egg takes up the foreground of the image showing crisp detail of the exploded object. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Signed by: Joe Clark, HBSS Clark PhotoFile: 8001-9
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot John Milligan Scrambling an Egg]

Description: Photograph of an egg in mid-explosion from a slingshot ball. In the image John Milligan stands in the background holding the slingshot in position while the exploded egg takes up the foreground of the image showing crisp detail of the exploded egg. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 8001-25
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot Ball Impacting Egg]

Description: Photograph of an egg upon impact from a slingshot ball being shot by John Milligan. In the image the ball can be seen just hitting the shell and a small amount of the liquid from the egg is spewing out. Narrative by Junebug Clark: This photo was often referred to as "A Near Miss." Something that Slingshot Milligan never did and rare to capture. Consider this... The eggs being tossed up by hand randomly and John has to take aim and fire at the moving, tumbling target and also miss the camera which is positioned directly behind the path of the traveling egg. Lost a lot of eggs. Never a camera. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Signed by: Joe Clark, HBSS Clark PhotoFile: 8001-26
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Egg Scrambled Over Skillet by Slingshot John Milligan (2)]

Description: Photograph of John Milligan shooting an egg that was being dropped over a skillet. In the image a waitress on the left is holding a skillet under an egg that Milligan has shot through with a slingshot while it was in mid-air. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Signed by: Joe Clark, HBSS Clark PhotoFile: 8001-116
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot John Milligan Shooting Through an Egg]

Description: Photograph of an egg in mid-explosion from a slingshot ball. In the image John Milligan stands in the background holding the slingshot in position while the exploded egg takes up the foreground of the image showing crisp detail of the exploded egg. Narrative by Junebug Clark: Check out the Slingshot John Milligan series in Clark Family Collection and you will be amazed and the timing and images captured. This image is taken a fraction of a second after impact and the photo is completely different from the moment of impact. Photo Editors and Photographers were stunned by Joe's ability to precisely capture these images. "How did he do it?" The phone rang off the hook. Even today with laser, sound, photo-cell triggers it would take a crew to photograph a series like this (and they probably would give up and use Photoshop). "Give me the answer," they would ask. Joe's reply, "I used Hillbilly Ingenuity." John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 8001-13
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot John Milligan about to Scramble an Egg (2)]

Description: Photograph of John Milligan about to scramble a tossed egg with a slingshot. In the image an egg is stopped mid-toss while Milligan aims for his shot. An additional hand, for tossing the egg up, and a camera can be seen in the frame. Narrative by Junebug Clark: Try tossing an egg up a few feet in the air and catching it in your home kitchen. See how little time it takes to (hopefully) catch it. Slingshot Milligan had to take aim, adjust for the egg's trajectory, take into consideration missing the 4x5 camera and lens positioned behind the egg trajectory and fire. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 8001-3
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Series of Exploding Eggs]

Description: Photograph containing four photographs of an egg being shot. The eggs were targeted by slingshot shooter John Milligan as the eggs rested atop of the fingers of photographer Joe Clark, HSSS. In the images the eggs are in mid-explosion after being shot through with a stainless steel slingshot ball launched by a Milligan Special in the hands of Slingshot John Milligan. Narrative by Junebug Clark: Three dozen eggs were "Scrambled" by Slingshot Milligan off of the back of Joe Clark's hand at 25 paces. This entire Slingshot Milligan photo series was shot with a 4x5 camera. That meant one shot, one photograph. Timing of the Joe Clark, HBSS photo and of course the aim of Slingshot Milligan had to be coordinated and perfect. Each millisecond that the camera shutter was tripped produces a completely different image. Was the timing perfect? With film cameras you did not know until the film was processed. Would you like to put another, another and another egg on the back of your hand and let Slingshot Milligan scramble it for the sake of the perfect photograph? John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. ...
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Slingshot John Milligan Fixes a Messy Omelet (1)]

Description: Photograph of John Milligan shooting an egg that was being dropped over a skillet. In the image a lady on the left is holding a skillet under an egg that Milligan has shot through with a slingshot while it was in mid-air. Narrative by Junebug Clark: "Marksman at 25 Paces Fixes a Messy Omelet" is the title given to the story and this photo that appears full page in Life Magazine. John Milligan, a machinist in Detroit, Michigan who was also the “country’s greatest slingshot expert. “He won local fame by shooting the marks out of playing cards, hitting objects in mid air and bagging game in the field.” Joe took John national with his photos documenting his talent and accuracy. To assure accuracy, he has designed his own precision-built aluminum sling, called the Milligan Special. Additional photos and information can be found in the Clark Family Collection. Photos from this series appeared in eight national publications. Here you can find articles in “Life Magazine . February 3, 1961. Pages 80-83. And in a fifteen page pictorial in the book “Photojournalism” by Joe Clark, HBSS. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 8001-80
Date: January 17, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections