100 Matching Results

Search Results

A Study of the Philosophy of Froebel Concerning the Practical Arts and His Influence on the Philosophy of Modern-Day Industrial Arts in the United States

Description: This is a comparative study of Friedrich Froebel's educational philosophy concerning the practical arts and the philosophy of modern-day industrial arts. The study does not attempt to present new ideas concerning these philosophies, but it merely endeavors to co-ordinate the ideas of various educators in relation to the subject.
Date: 1951
Creator: Peters, Lowell D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity

Description: This is the official website for Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity (CSID) at the University of North Texas. CSID conducts research into the theory and practice of inter- and transdisciplinary approaches to knowledge. The site includes information about CSID's research projects, its publications, and the people involved.
Date: 2014
Creator: University of North Texas. Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

A Comparison of the Educational Philosophies of Pragmatism and Essentialism and their Effects on Education

Description: The purpose of this study was to make an appraisal of the educational philosophies, pragmatism and essentialism, and their effects upon the aims, methods, and curriculum of education. No effective effort was made to branch off into the many philosophical ramifications of the question, but the practical aspects of each philosophy were studied in order to determine how it has influenced education.
Date: 1942
Creator: Womack, Vera
Partner: UNT Libraries

Afterlife Research and the Shamanic Turn

Description: Abstract: In Western culture, approaches to the afterlife have mutated throughout history, from shamanism and mythology to philosophy, spiritualism, and psychical research. For conceptual reasons, however, survival research seems to many to be languishing, despite some remarkable recent advances. I urge a return to a more experience-based approach, modeled after features of the near-death experience, for its practical benefits; I intend that approach to complement other forms of research, not displace them. Finally, I underscore the unique status of survival research as a scientific pursuit.
Date: Autumn 2001
Creator: Grosso, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Superjective Ontology: A Post-Cartesian Tool for the Near-Death Experience

Description: Abstract: This study questions the validity of subjective and objective categories, and suggests a new approach, which I call "superjective ontology," as a tool for resolving archaic difficulties. In the first section, I present evidence that a deeply ingrained problem of "ontological disparity" really does exist, along with the extent to which this conditions our thought patterns. I then summarize monism and dualism, and present the core thesis advancing the argument from superjective ontology. Finally I suggest evidence that might be sought for the core thesis, with special emphasis on the near-death experience.
Date: Autumn 2004
Creator: Carmen, A. Ashanen
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Phenomenology of Music Analysis

Description: Many of the early writings and lectures of the German phenomenological philosopher Martin Heidegger involve investigations into the question of Being. An important part of these investigations is his examination of how we go about the everyday business of existing--doing our jobs, dealing with things in our environment, working through problems, thinking, talking--and what our ways of operating in these everyday activities tell us about our Being in general. Musicians have their own everyday musical tasks, two of the most prominent of which are composing and performing. Composers and performers, like everyone else, have a 'world'--Heidegger's word for the structure of relationships between equipment, persons, and tasks and the way in which a person is situated in that structure--and that 'world' allows them to cope with their musical environment in ways that enable them to make music as composers and performers. Analyzing music is an activity that a Heideggerian approach sees as derived from the primary musical activities of composing and performing. A music analyst trades the possibility of primary musical involvement for a kind of involvement that points out determinate characteristics; hence in adopting an analytical stance, the analyst trades doing something musical for saying something about music. In making such a trade, however, a prior musical involvement--a basic musicality--is always presupposed. Every way of analyzing music has its own way of making determinations, and after detailing the manner of the derivation of the general analytical attitude, this study examines several types of analysis and the ways in which they exemplify the derivative nature of analytical activity. One extended example, an analysis of Jean Sibelius's The Swan of Tuonela, provides several opportunities for discussion (via interspersed passages of commentary) of a view of music analysis drawn from Heideggerian phenomenology.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Anderson, Andrew E. (Andrew Edwin)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Nothing

Description: Philosophical writings by an unknown author regarding "nothing" including the connotations of the word and its grammar.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Beauty of Environment: A General Model for Environmental Aesthetics

Description: This book is a "systematic outlining of the field of environmental aesthetics beginning from the basis of analytical philosophy" (p. ix). The author discusses ecological and anthropological aesthetics, environmental ethics, the relation of art to nature, and environmental education and legislation. The index begins on page 188.
Date: 1993
Creator: Sepänmaa, Yrjö
Partner: UNT Center For Environmental Philosophy

Toward a Rationale for Music Education in the Public School Context Framed with both Progressive and Essentialist Considerations: Operationalizing the Ideas of William Chandler Bagley

Description: In music education, aesthetic education and praxial music education serve as two major, guiding philosophical frameworks, yet supporters of each often conflict with one another. Furthermore, both are slightly problematic with respect to the specific context of the public school. Each framework is primarily music-based, however, music education has existed in the wider context of general education since the 1830s. Given the recent core-status designation for music education, as part of all fine arts, in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, a framework from general education that supported music education could offer benefits for the domain. However, the wider context of general education is messy as well. Two groups occupy most of the space there, and remain locked in a fundamental disagreement over the purpose of a formal education. The progressive educators, historically framed by Dewey and Thorndike, contend that education functions as societal improvement. In contrast, the essentialists contend that education functions as cultural transmission. Therefore, a more specific need for music education involves selecting a framework from general education that resolves this conflict. The writings of William Chandler Bagley indicate that he balanced both considerations of a formal education while also advancing his notion of essentialism. Bagley differed from the progressive educators predominately associated with Dewey over definitions and ideas surrounding a democratic education. Emergent points of contrast with Thorndike include distinctions between social efficiency and Bagley's alternative idea of social progress. Bagley also diverged from other essentialists over definitions concerning liberal and cultural education. To make these viewpoints of Bagley explicit, I describe characteristics of a progressive education, and an essentialist education separately, before introducing Bagley. Finally, I apply Bagley's ideas into the domain of music education. Ultimately, I contend that through common outcomes of creativity, competition, and literacy, the domain of music education ...
Date: May 2016
Creator: Price, Benjamin J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

Description: This article examines aspects of William James's thought such as his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and "the compounding of consciousness," which suggest his working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness.
Date: October 4, 2011
Creator: Hawkins, Stephanie
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

A Comparative Study of the Philosophy of Certain Authors Relative to Reading Readiness

Description: The problem of this investigation is to determine the amount of agreement or disagreement in the philosophies of certain authors relative to reading readiness in the first grade. Comparative data are included on evidences of the need for reading-readiness program, major factors involved, and desirable types of activities. The purpose of the study is to determine the apparent agreement or disparity found in current educational literature.
Date: August 1953
Creator: Stockstill, Zana
Partner: UNT Libraries

Near-Death Experiences and A Course in Miracles

Description: Article comparing near-death experiences (NDEs) to the philosophy described in the spiritual text A Course in Miracles (1976). It provides an overview of the text's philosophy, previous literature comparing the text to NDEs, and an analysis of how the philosophies are similar and different, with references to specific cases.
Date: Summer 2014
Creator: Perry, Robert & Mackie, Greg
Partner: UNT Libraries

Goya's Fantastic Vision of Madness

Description: This paper discusses Francisco de Goya. Employing Foucault's discourse to specific works reveals Goya's ability to represent visually the fundamental tension between Romantic and Classical ideas, especially the ambiguous line between reason and madness.
Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Prater, Paige & Abel, Mickey S.
Partner: UNT Honors College

On City Identity and Its Moral Dimensions

Description: The majority of people on Earth now live in cities, and estimates hold that 60 percent of the world’s cities have yet to be built. Now is the time for philosophers to develop a philosophy of the city to address the forthcoming issues that urbanization will bring. In this dissertation, I respond to this need for a philosophy of the city by developing a theory of city identity, developing some of the theory’s normative implications, illustrating the theory with a case study, and outlining the nature and future of philosophy of the city more generally. Indeed, this dissertation is only a part of my larger project of founding and institutionalizing this new field of both academic and socially-engaged philosophical activity. Throughout the history of the discipline, other areas such a personal identity have received numerous considerations, along with the concept of identity as an abstraction. For example, there is a bounty of research addressing problems pertaining to how objects and people retain an identity over time and claims about identity in general. While one could argue that cities are not any different than any other object, such an account fails to consider that a city’s dynamic nature makes it dissimilar to other things. To illustrate this point, I develop a position called dynamic composition as identity theory that provides a framework for understanding the identity of a city, exhibiting that views within analytic metaphysics are too narrow to apply to all cases. After establishing a concept of city identity, I use an applied mereology to develop a model of city identity that shows how the parts of a city fit together to form a complete city. This model introduces the normative dimension of my project by providing a way to identify how incongruence between a city’s parts can cause problems ...
Date: December 2015
Creator: Epting, Shane Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries