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The Impact of Family Resilience Factors and Parent Gender on Stress Among Parents of Children with Autism

Description: Parents of children with autism experience high degrees of stress. Research pertaining to the reduction of parental stress in families with a child with autism is needed. In this study, the relationship between family resilience, parent gender, and parental stress was examined. Seventy-one parents of young children with autism were surveyed. Regression and correlational analyses were performed. Results indicated that the vast majority of respondents reported significantly high levels of stress. Lower degrees of parental stress were correlated with higher degrees of family resilience. Family resiliency factors were significant contributors to the shared variance in parental stress. Mothers of children demonstrated higher levels of stress than fathers. Suggested explanations of these findings are presented and clinical and research implications are provided. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of facilitating family resilience for parents of children with autism and affirm differing stress levels between mothers and fathers.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Cheatham, Kelly L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Supporting Mathematics Understanding Through Funds of Knowledge

Description: Parents are often criticized for the types of roles they play in their children’s education. Rather than assuming parents do not contribute to their children’s learning, this study identified the various ways Hispanic parents support mathematics learning in the home. Using a funds of knowledge lens, the history, practices, and experiences of families that contributed to their children’s mathematics understanding was explored. The purpose of this study was to identify the unique funds of knowledge among three Hispanic families living in the same city, specifically, how parents supported their children’s mathematics learning through funds of knowledge. Five Hispanic parents from three households participated in a series of three home interviews. The semi--‐structured interviews addressed family, school, and educational history of the parents, routines of the household, and perceived roles parents played in their children’s mathematics learning. Participants contributed to their children’s mathematics learning through various funds of knowledge including time management, music, sports, construction, shopping, and cooking. Participating parents shared knowledge with their children through questioning and discussion, providing experiences, and promoting practice. In this study, participants valued education and supported their children’s mathematics learning at home and school activities. This study contributes to the existing funds of knowledge research by expanding the work on how Hispanic parents support mathematics learning.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Williams, Julie J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Coming Out: The Lived Experiences of LGB College Students who Feel Supported by Their Parents

Description: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore how LGB college students created meaning out of their coming out process to their parents. I recruited LGB college students who perceived support from their parents during their coming out process and asked the following research question: What are the lived experiences of LGB college students who have experienced support from their parents during the coming out process? Seven White (n = 4), African American (n = 2), and Hispanic (n = 1) college students, three men and four women aged 18-24 years, shared narratives that included time periods before, during, and after their coming out disclosures to their parents. Using an adapted phenomenological analysis, I identified nine major themes: awareness of feeling different, positive relationship with parents prior to coming out, college impacting the coming out process, feeling unsure of how parents would respond to disclosure, parents assuring continued loved and acceptance, parents affirming LGB identity, increased relational depth with parents, increased sense of authenticity, and an appreciation for family's response and support. The findings provide insight into how counselors might work most beneficially with LGB college students and their parents around the coming out process. Opportunities for future research and limitations of the study are discussed.
Date: May 2017
Creator: Price, Eric W
Partner: UNT Libraries

Rated M for Monkey: An Ethnographic Study of Parental Information Behavior when Assessing Video Game Content for their Children

Description: Following the decision by the Supreme Court of the United States in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association (2011), which struck down the state of California’s appeal to restrict the sale of games deemed to have “deviant violence” to those 18 or older and the court’s recommendation that parents use the ESRB Ratings System instead, this ethnographic study sought to better understand what parents thought of laws on video games and how they used the recommended ratings system. A total of 30 interviews using semi-structured open-ended questions were conducted and analyzed to reveal what parents thought of laws on video games, how they used the ESRB Ratings System to assess video game content, and what other methods they used for video game content assessment in addition to the ratings system. This research utilized Dervin and Nilan’s (1986) sense-making methodology as a way to learn how parents bridged their knowledge gap when it came to learning about video game content and how they made sense of the knowledge gained to determine the content appropriateness for their children. Analyses of the collected data provided the foundation for a model on the effects of the parent-child relationship on parental information behavior.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Harrelson, Diana Dawn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science Parent Handbook and Student Information Guide, 1994-1995

Description: Handbook for parents of students in the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science for the 1994-95 school year. It includes an introduction, information on academics, student life, a TAMS troubleshooter, academy organizations, financial information, Denton information, and additional information.
Date: 1994
Creator: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science
Partner: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science

Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science Parent Handbook, 1989-1990

Description: Handbook for parents of students in the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science for the 1989-90 school year. The handbook includes information on academic assistance, computers, high school equivalency, honors, National Merit Scholar program, student life, address information, the bookstore, the campus, discipline, emotional concerns, employment, health care, housing, insurance, packing, parental permission, the post office, safety, security, shipping, spending money, storage, the telephone, transportation, travel arrangements, and what and what not to bring to campus.
Date: 1989
Creator: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science
Partner: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science

Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science Parent Handbook and Student Information Guide, 1993-1994

Description: Handbook for parents of students in the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science for the 1993-94 school year. It includes an introduction, information on academics, student life, a TAMS troubleshooter, academy organizations, financial information, Denton information, and additional information.
Date: 1993
Creator: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science
Partner: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science

Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science Parent Handbook, 1990-1991

Description: Handbook for parents of students in the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science for the 1990-91 school year. It includes an introduction, student profile, academy calendar, information on academics, student life, financial information, social life, local resources, who to contact in emergencies and non-emergencies, and a map of campus.
Date: 1990
Creator: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science
Partner: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science

A Study to Determine if there are Significant Interacting Physical, Mental, and Emotional Factors Developed by Parents of Sherman, Texas, which Influence Readiness for Beginning Reading

Description: The purpose of the study is to approach the problem from a practical and workable angle in determining which definite and significant influences have been of benefit to the first-grade pupils of Sherman, Texas, in preparing them for reading readiness.
Date: August 1950
Creator: Kelley, Clella D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relative Effectiveness of Parental Positive Reinforcement and Punishment in Reducing Oppositional Behavior in Children and in Increasing the Frequency of Parent-Child Interaction

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the relative effectiveness of the reinforcement and punishment techniques in the natural environment, and the effect of their use upon the social interaction between parent and child. It was hypothesized that punishment would be more effective than reward in controlling oppositional behavior, but that reinforcement would be more effective in increasing child-initiated interaction with the parents.
Date: December 1970
Creator: Detrich, Ronnie
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relation between the Self-concept and Values of Parents with Their Children

Description: In accordance with theories of Carmichael (19), Lecky (41), and Rogers (55), which suggest that adolescence is a time of redefining conceptions about one's self in relation to values, groups, and institutions in one's environment, the following hypotheses were proposed to be investigated in this study: 1. The difference between mothers' and fathers' self-concept scores is nonsignificant. 2. Parents have higher self-concepts than their children. 3. Parents of children with high self-concepts will differ significantly from parents of children with low self-concepts with respect to their values.
Date: January 1970
Creator: Mackenzie, Donna Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Person Orientation of College Students' Vocational Interests as a Function of their Parents' Perceptions of Parent-Child Interactions

Description: This study investigated what relationship might exist between the parents' view of their interactions with their children and the degree of person orientation in their children's vocational interests. The hypotheses of this study were that the parents of subjects with toward-person-oriented vocational interests would perceive their interactions with their children as being more loving and overtly attentive than parents of subjects with away-from-person-oriented vocational interests. It was further hypothesized that these differences would be greater for males than for females.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Price, Jack Randall
Partner: UNT Libraries

Retrospective Perceptions of Early Parent-Child Relations and Occupational Orientation

Description: The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between early perceptions of parent-child relations, as measured by the Roe and Siegelman Parent-Child Relations Questionnaire (PCR), and the occupational orientation of the child, as measured by the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB).
Date: December 1971
Creator: Smith, Richard E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Parental Roles and Behavior in Children

Description: This investigation was concerned with the goals parents set for their children, the child-rearing methods parents use to instill their goals in the child, and the behavioral and personality characteristics of the child. To measure these dimensions, participation was solicited from parents who had children enrolled in the North Texas State University Laboratory School.
Date: December 1970
Creator: McLendon, David M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Variables Related to Parents' Stated Reasons for Institutionalizing Mentally Retarded Males

Description: The purpose of this investigation is to determine some of the variables related to parents' stated reasons for institutionalizing mentally retarded males. The variables to be studied are the age, education, and income of the parents and the age, level of retardation, and number of siblings of the child.
Date: August 1964
Creator: Dreisbach, Linda Kay
Partner: UNT Libraries

Adolescents' Perception of Parental Behavior toward Them and its Relationship with Sex, Delinquency, and Security

Description: This study investigated adolescents' perception of parental behavior toward them and its relationship with sex, delinquency, and security. The subjects chosen for the study were sixty boys and sixty girls from eleventh grade English classes, and sixty boys and sixty girls from two institutions for juvenile delinquents. All subjects were white, they ranged in age from fifteen through eighteen years, and they had two living parents.
Date: May 1972
Creator: Mojallali, Shah, 1938-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Perceptions of parents of students with autism towards the IEP meeting.

Description: The purpose of the study was to investigate how parents of students with autism perceived individualized education program (IEP) meetings. I determined factors that contributed to the belief held by parents that their children were or were not being properly served by IEP meetings. Parental relationships with educators, IEP meeting experiences, IEP outcomes, and treatment by educators were revealed through participant input. Parents were asked to share their experiences of previous IEP meetings. Additionally, parents provided input regarding practices that school districts could take to improve IEP meetings, and actions that parents could take to serve as better advocates for their children. Research findings indicated that parents did not perceive themselves as being treated as equals during IEP meetings. Parents believed that their input was not valued or welcomed by educators. Not having an equal voice toward their child's education prevented parents from positively influencing outcomes in their child's IEP meetings in terms of obtaining quality services and building positive relations with educators. Parents further revealed that educators failed to implement proper IEP protocol. According to parents, student objectives agreed upon in IEP meetings were often not always fully implemented for students receiving special education services. Research findings concluded that parents new to the IEP process often experienced difficulty understanding special education law, and were unaware of services that school districts should provide for their children.Suggestions for improving IEP meetings include: educators valuing parents as equal partners during IEP meetings, educators properly adhering to IEP objectives set forth in IEP meetings, and both educators and parents taking measures to becoming more knowledgeable of special education law and the IEP process.
Date: December 2004
Creator: Fish, Wade W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Child-Centered Play Therapy Parent Services: a Q-Methodological Investigation

Description: Child-centered play therapy (CCPT) is an empirically supported and developmentally appropriate counseling intervention for young children. Despite the clinical effectiveness of CCPT with children, no known study has been conducted in which parents were surveyed or interviewed regarding the services they have received as a part of their children’s participation in CCPT. Therefore, this study was designed to gain a better understanding of parents’ reported needs and expectations in CCPT. This study utilized Q-methodology in which participants completed a Q-sort by actively sorting 40 items on a continuum of least important to most important. Items included services and processes regarded by CCPT scholars and child therapy practitioners as being important to working with parents. Data was collected from 19 parents of children receiving CCPT services in a community-based counseling clinic. Participants included 16 females and 3 males; 15 Caucasian and 4 Hispanic; and 14 biological parents, 2 adoptive parents, and 3 other biological caregivers. Data was analyzed using centroid factor analysis, and results revealed a one factor solution representing 18 of the 19 participants. Eighteen parents reported similar beliefs regarding the processes they consider most and least important to their experience in working with child-centered play therapists. In general, parents’ beliefs aligned with CCPT philosophy, particularly in regards to respecting children’s natural pace of development and healing. Furthermore, parents shared preferences for play therapists who demonstrate expert knowledge and training and who understand the individual needs of their children. Discussion includes implications for the practice of CCPT and training of future play therapists, limitations of the study, and implications for future research.
Date: December 2014
Creator: Lee, Kasie R.
Partner: UNT Libraries