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[News Clip: Padre Island]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 5:30 P.M.
Date: August 11, 1979
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Medical Waste (Hospital Waste)]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story by Linda Frederick about fears and risks associated with improper disposal of medical waste, particularly needles. This story includes the cover of a magazine about water pollution, b-roll of medical waste being disposed of and a woman drawing a patient's blood before disposing of the needle, unidentified hospital and laboratory staff speaking about waste and disposal, an interview with Dr. Charles Haley about the low-risk of disease transmission from medical byproducts, and a slow-motion demonstration by Frederick of how to improperly dispose of a needle. This story aired at 10:00 P.M.
Date: October 12, 1988
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Slick Suit]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 6:00 P.M.
Date: August 24, 1979
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Oil Rig]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 5:30 P.M.
Date: May 12, 1979
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Tsunami Risk Reduction for the United States: A Framework for Action

Description: This document describes proposals for making communities better prepared and more resilient to catastrophic natural disasters like the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2006. Methods described include warning systems, data sharing, and land use decisions.
Date: December 2005
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Subcommittee on Natural Disaster Reduction.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Shoreline]

Description: Photograph of a shoreline in Ireland. A green hill is visible in the foreground. Water fills the left side of the frame and the shore and green hillsides fill the right. Hills and clouds are visible in the background.
Date: 1970
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Mexican House]

Description: Photograph of a house in Mexico. The house is situated in the center foreground amidst dense plant life. There is a pool on the left side of the house. Beyond the house, the sea and distant shore are visible in the background.
Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) Science Plan

Description: Human population and associated industrial activities continue to increase rapidly, and have reached levels that put the environment under stress in many areas of the world. In addition natural fluctuations of the Earth's physical and biological systems, often occur in time frames that are not readily evident to man. Such fluctuations cause additional stress on the environment, and can result in changes that impact society in terms of diminished availability of clean water, unspoiled land and natural vegetation, minerals, fish stocks, and clean air. Human societies are making a rapidly increasing number of policy and management decisions that attempt to allow both for natural fluctuations and to limit or modify human impact. Such decisions are often ineffective, as a result of economic, political and social constraints, and inadequate understanding of the interactions between human activities and natural responses. Improved understanding of such issues is important in its own right, and will contribute to ameliorating economic, political and social constraints. Developing improved understanding of environmental change is within the realm of the natural sciences and is being addressed by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and other programmes concerned with describing and understanding the Earth System. Natural variability, occurring over a variety of time scales, dominates the health of complex marine ecosystems, regardless of fishing or other environmental pressure. We are only now beginning to compile quantitative documentation of such variability, and consequently our knowledge concerning its causes remains at the level of hypotheses. Understanding of the role of variability in the functioning of marine ecosystems is essential if we are to effectively manage global marine living resources such as fisheries during this period of tremendously increased human impact, and concurrent dependence, on these resources.
Date: 1997
Creator: Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC)
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Approaching La Guaira]

Description: Photograph of the approach to La Guaira, Venezuela. In the foreground, a woman poses on the deck of a boat. The boat is in the water with the shore in the background. The shore rises up into mountainous terrain.
Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Ocean Biogeochemistry and Global Change

Description: From the perspective of terrestrial ecosystems, the most important component of global change over the next three or four decades will likely be land-use/cover change. It is driven largely by the need to feed the expanding human population, expected to increase by almost one billion (109) people per decade for the next three decades at least. Much of this increase will occur in developing countries in the low-latitude regions of the world. To meet the associated food demand, crop yields will need to increase, consistently, by over 2% every year through this period. Despite advances in technology, increasing food production must lead to intensification of agriculture in areas which are already cropped, and conversion of forests and grasslands into cropping systems. Much of the latter will occur in semi-arid regions and on lands which are marginally suitable for cultivation, increasing the risk of soil erosion, accelerated water use, and further land degradation.
Date: 1997
Creator: Joint Global Ocean Flux Study
Partner: UNT Libraries

Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972

Description: The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA), also referred to as the Ocean Dumping Act, generally prohibits transportation of material from the United States for the purpose of ocean dumping; transportation of material from anywhere for the purpose of ocean dumping by U.S. agencies or U.S.-flagged vessels; dumping of material transported from outside the United States into the U.S. territorial sea. A permit is required to deviate from these prohibitions. Under MPRSA, the standard fro permit issuance is whether the dumping will "unreasonably degrade or endanger" human health, welfare, or the marine environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is charged with developing ocean dumping criteria to be used in evaluating permit applications.
Date: unknown
Creator: United States. Congress.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Marine Ecosystems and Global Change

Description: The ocean is a vital component of the metabolism of the Earth and plays a key role in global change. In fact, the oceans cover so much of the Earth's surface that our planet has been described as the Water Planet, and it could be argued that its most extensive ecosystems are marine. Marine ecosystems are inextricably involved in the physical, chemical, biological and societal processes of global change. It is impossible to describe and understand the Earth system without understanding the ocean, the special characteristics of the environment that it provides for life, the changes that it is undergoing and the manner in which these changes interact with the total Earth System. Understanding the functioning of marine ecosystems and how they respond to global change is also essential in order to effectively manage global marine living resources, such as fisheries. The GLOBEC project is an international response to the need to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations, from zooplankton to fish, that comprise a major component of oceanic ecosystems. GLOBEC's goal is to advance our understanding of the structure and functioning of such ecosystems, their major subsystems, and responses to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast the response of marine ecosystems to global change. This volume in the IGBP Science Series, "Marine Ecosystems and Global Change", gives topical examples of the scientifi c problems that GLOBEC is tackling, the innovative approaches adopted, and some selected scientific achievements. It has been written at a time when GLOBEC is in the mid-phase of its implementation. The ultimate achievements of GLOBEC research will be presented in a final synthesis at the end of the project.
Date: 2003
Creator: Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics Project (GLOBEC)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics: Implementation Plan

Description: This document describes plans for the implementation of the Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) programme element of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). This Implementation Plan is an international response to the need to understand how global change, in the broadest sense, will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations comprising a major component of oceanic ecosystems. The Plan describes the consensus view, developed under the auspices of the GLOBEC Scientific Steering Committee (SSC), on the research required to fulfill the scientific goals laid out in the GLOBEC Science Plan (IGBP Report No. 40). The Implementation Plan expands on the Science Plan, drawing on the results and recommendations of workshops, meetings, and reports thereof, that have been sponsored under the auspices of GLOBEC. The GLOBEC research programme has four major components which, are described in detail in this Implementation Plan; the research Foci, Framework Activities, Regional Programmes, and Integrating Activity. These are summarized in the Table of Contents, and in schematic diagrams within the text. They are the elements that have been planned by, and will be implemented under the auspices of, the GLOBEC SSC. National GLOBEC programmes may select those aspects of this international framework which are relevant to meeting national objectives, or they may develop new directions as needed to meet specific national needs.
Date: 1999
Creator: GLOBEC International Project Office
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Surface Ocean - Lower Atmosphere Study: Science Plan and Implementation Strategy

Description: SOLAS (Surface Ocean - Lower Atmosphere Study) is a new international research initiative that has as its goal: To achieve quantitative understanding of the key biogeochemical-physical interactions and feedbacks between the ocean and the atmosphere, and of how this coupled system affects and is affected by climate and environmental change. Achievement of this goal is important in order to understand and quantify the role that ocean-atmosphere interactions play in the regulation of climate and global change. The domain of SOLAS is focussed on processes at the air-sea interface and includes a natural emphasis on the atmospheric and upper-ocean boundary layers, while recognising that some of the processes to be studied will, of necessity, be linked to significantly greater height and depth scales. SOLAS research will cover all ocean areas including coastal seas and ice covered areas. A fundamental characteristic of SOLAS is that the research is not only interdisciplinary (involving biogeochemistry, physics, mathematical modelling, etc.), but also involves closely coupled studies requiring marine and atmospheric scientists to work together. Such research will require a shift in attitude within the academic and funding communities, both of which are generally organised on a medium-by-medium basis in most countries.
Date: 2004
Creator: Broadgate, Wendy & Young, Bill
Partner: UNT Libraries

Agreement with Canada on Pacific hake/whiting : message from the President of the United States transmitting agreement between the government of the United States of America and the government of Canada on Pacific hake/whiting (the "agreement"), done at Seattle, November 21, 2003

Description: This treaty establishes agreed percentage shares of the trans-boundary stock of Pacific hake, also known as Pacific whiting. It also creates a process through which U.S. and Canadian scientists and fisheries managers will recommend the total catch of Pacific hake each year.
Date: unknown
Creator: United States. President (2001-2009 : Bush) & Powell, Colin L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Unveiling of 1961 Automobiles]

Description: Photograph of 1961 Automobiles being unveiled on the parking ramp of Detroit's Cobo Hall. This appeared as a two page spread in Life Magazine's October 17, 1960 issue. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Clark PhotoFile: 7800-110. The Life Magazine article was titled: The Hot Issue of America's Vitality and read. "On the futuristic ramp of Detroit's Cobo Hall, a parade of 1961 model autos spiraled down from the roof to be enshrined, almost like jewels, for this week's opening of the 43rd National Auto Show in the brand-new $54 million exposition palace beside the Detroit River. This was a sight guaranteed to stir excitement in the breast of a car-conscious nation on wheels. But it was more than that. The manufacture of automobiles is one of the nation's largest industries and a major index of the health of its economy. Here Detroit hoped to learn whether the public would approve what it was offering. Here too it could be possible to foretell with fair accuracy whether the nation could expect a year of boom or business doldrums. Detroit's splash with the '61s takes on even greater significance because this is an election year in which the state of the economy and how to improve its future has become a bitterly divisive issue between Vice President Nixon and Senator John Kennedy. President Eisenhower tacitly acknowledged the political importance of what went on in Cobo Hall by promising to make an address there on October 17. Big as it is, the issue is bigger than the 1961 model year. It is the absorbing issue of what goes into and comes out of every American's pocket book. It is an issue composed of vital stuff, measured in terms of prices, job or no job, growth or no growth--and it is an essential background ...
Date: 1960
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections