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The Ties that Bind : Breaking the Bonds of Victimization in the Novels of Barbara Pym, Fay Weldon and Margaret Atwood

Description: In this study of several novels each by Barbara Pym, Fay Weldon, and Margaret Atwood, I focus on two areas: the ways in which female protagonists break out of their victimization by individuals, by institutions, and by cultural tradition, and the ways in which each author uses a structural pattern in her novels to propel her characters to solve their dilemmas to the best of their abilities and according to each woman's personality and strengths.
Date: December 1994
Creator: Rathburn, Fran M. (Frances Margaret), 1948-
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Monomythic Journey of the Feminie Hero in the Novels of Anita Brookner

Description: Joseph Campbell, in The Hero with a Thousand Faces, establishes a pattern for the hero to answer the call to adventure, ask the question of the goddess and receive her boon, and return to his homeland. Campbell does not, however, make any suggestions about a myth whose protagonist is female. Erich Neumann, in The Origins and History of Consciousness, hints that the woman may, indeed, be her own goddess, that she must give herself the boon she already carries. The novels of Anita Brookner illustrate the dual nature of the feminine protagonist: the seeker and the boon giver. The feminine hero (even when Brookner's protagonist is masculine, he exhibits feminine qualities) hears the call to adventure, receives the teachings of the goddess and/or her representative, receives help fromother beings (in myth these would be supernatural beings), realizes that she carries the answer to the cosmic question of selfhood within her, and, following an apotheosis, makes a return to society. Much of the present work is spent delving into both the monomythic and feminist structures of Brookner's novels. Although Brookner characterizes herself as a "reluctant feminist," examination of her novels reveals a subtle adherence to feminist principles which can be ascertained by viewing each novel in terms of the monomyth schema.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Rutledge, Mary E. (Mary Elizabeth)
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Transcript of Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her family, October 10,1863]

Description: Transcript of a letter Maud Fentress wrote to her family regarding the problems she experienced when trying to send letters. She discusses the cotton crop and what her expenses are. The difficulties in acquiring a horse are given. She discusses the risk of capture, pillaging, and warns not to wear uniforms if going on furlough. She gives updates on family and friends. She expresses her anxiety over the freed slaves. She also gives her opinion on books she has read.
Date: October 10, 1863
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Letter from Maud Fentress, October 10,1863]

Description: Letter Maud Fentress wrote to her family regarding the problems she experienced when trying to send letters. She discusses the cotton crop and what her expenses are. The difficulties in acquiring a horse are given. She discusses the risk of capture, pillaging, and warns not to wear uniforms if going on furlough. She gives updates on family and friends. She expresses her anxiety over the freed slaves. She also gives her opinion on books she has read.
Date: October 10, 1863
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Treatment of Nature in Thomas Hardy's Six Major Novels

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to examine Thomas Hardy's treatment of nature in his major works. His interpretation of nature was sharply divergent from the traditional viewpoint regarding the natural world, and it was the direct antithesis of those interpretations of nature made by the writers who had preceded him.
Date: January 1959
Creator: Spann, Marjorie Williams
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Comic Element in the Novels of Thomas Wolfe

Description: As to form, Wolfe's novels are deliberately loose, because that is important to his purpose. Conceiving America as an open society of potentiality, he could do no less than remain open himself. To do otherwise would have meant impotence if not sterility. In this thesis, I shall attempt to show that the episodes, divergences, and observations all illustrate and amplify this spiritual growth.
Date: 1957
Creator: Hanig, David Daniel
Partner: UNT Libraries

Structure as a Literary Technique in the Major Novels of Ernest Hemingway

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to study the structure of the five major novels of Hemingway, excluding Torrents of Spring and Across the River and into the Trees. They are: The Sun also Rises; A Farewell to Arms; To Have and Have not; For Whom the Bell Tolls; and The Old Man and the Sea.
Date: 1956
Creator: Harrell, Robert Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Clip: Dick Schaap]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 5:00 P.M.
Date: January 22, 1979
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Rhetoric of Posthumanism in Four Twentieth-Century International Novels

Description: The dissertation traces the trope of the incomplete character in four twentieth-century cosmopolitan novels that reflect European colonialism in a global context. I argue that, by creating characters sharply aware of the insufficiency of the Self and thus constantly seeking the constitutive participation of the Other, the four authors E. M. Forster, Samuel Beckett, J. M. Coetzee, and Congwen Shen all dramatize the incomplete character as an agent of postcolonial resistance to Western humanism that, tending to enforce the divide between the Self and the Other, provided the epistemological basis for the emergence of European colonialism. For example, Fielding's good-willed aspiration to forge cross-cultural friendship in A Passage to India; Murphy's dogged search for recognition of his Irish identity in Murphy; Susan's unfailing compassion to restore Friday's lost speech in Foe; and Changshun Teng, the Chinese orange-grower's warm-hearted generosity toward his customers in Long River--all these textual occasions dramatize the incomplete character's anxiety over the Other's rejection that will impair the fullness of his or her being, rendering it solitary and empty. I relate this anxiety to the theory of "posthumanism" advanced by such thinkers as Marx, Bakhtin, Sartre, and Lacan; in their texts the humanist view of the individual as an autonomous constitution has undergone a transformation marked by the emphasis on locating selfhood not in the insular and static Self but in the mutable middle space connecting the Self and the Other.
Date: August 1998
Creator: Lin, Lidan
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Role of History in Kenneth Roberts' Novels

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate Kenneth Roberts' transmutation of American history into living literature. This examination will cover the following novels: Arundel (1929), The Lively Lady (1931), Rabble in Arms (1933), Captain Caution (1934), Northwest Passage (1937), Oliver Wiswell (1940), and Lydia Bailey (1947).
Date: January 1969
Creator: Harris, F. Janet
Partner: UNT Libraries

The South in Faulkner's Novels: Myth and History

Description: The purpose of this paper is to view Faulkner's use of history from a different perspective by examining in detail the myths and historical facts with which Faulkner dealt. First, several of the prevailing myths about the Old South and the Civil War will be examined. Second, the actual historical facts will be compared and contrasted with legendary tradition. Third, and most important, several of Faulkner's works will be examined to show how he uses both the myths and historical facts to create his own "legend" of the South. Finally, Faulkner's view of the New South will be examined.
Date: January 1969
Creator: Lee, Barbara Yates
Partner: UNT Libraries

Strife, Balance, and Allegiance : The Schemata of Will in Five Novels of D. H. Lawrence

Description: D. H. Lawrence made the final break through the mask of Victorian prudery to gain a full conception of man and his role in the universe. His principal emphasis is on the restoration of man's conception of himself as animal, an animal capable of conceptualizing, but essentially animal all the same. In attempting to restore man to the mindless state of irrational animism, Lawrence did away with the conventional idea of man as the perfection of God's created universe. Lawrence did not conceive of man as being controller of the natural universe; he thought of man as being, like Mellors in Lady Chatterly's Lover, a warden who lives within natural order. He attacks vain intellectual sophistry of the scientific, industrial society and finds man to be a brute spirit caged by the conventions of his puny reason and his self-imposed social customs. Philosophically, he changes the emphasis from being to becoming.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Fiddes, Teresa Monahan
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Image of Germany in the Novels of Günter Grass

Description: This thesis will attempt to scrutinize Günter Grass's message to his people and show his concern for the spiritual health of his country. Each of his three novels bears directly upon political, religious, and moral issues vital to Germany and to the world. The examination is based upon the assumption that Grass as an author is more concerned that Germans see themselves as they are and as they have been than he is concerned with the image of Germany which his novels present to the world. It is, paradoxically, this very special and sincere concern which gives his work universal appeal.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Boyar, Billy T.
Partner: UNT Libraries