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The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke: Volume 3, June 1, 1878-June 22, 1880

Description: John Gregory Bourke kept a monumental set of diaries beginning as a young cavalry lieutenant in Arizona in 1872, and ending the evening before his death in 1896. As aide-de-camp to Brigadier General George Crook, he had an insider's view of the early Apache campaigns, the Great Sioux War, the Cheyenne Outbreak, and the Geronimo War. Bourke's writings reveal much about military life on the western frontier, but he also was a noted ethnologist, writing extensive descriptions of American Indian civilization and illustrating his diaries with sketches and photographs. Previously, researchers could consult only a small part of Bourke's diary material in various publications, or else take a research trip to the archive and microfilm housed at West Point. Now, for the first time, the 124 manuscript volumes of the Bourke diaries are being compiled, edited, and annotated by Charles M. Robinson III, in a planned set of eight books easily accessible to the modern researcher. Volume 3 begins in 1878 with a discussion of the Bannock Uprising and a retrospective on Crazy Horse, whose death Bourke called "an event of such importance, and with its attendant circumstances pregnant with so much of good or evil for the settlement between the Union Pacific Rail Road and the Yellowstone River." Three other key events during this period were the Cheyenne Outbreak of 1878-79, the Ponca Affair, and the White River Ute Uprising, the latter two in 1879. The mistreatment of the Poncas infuriated Bourke: when recording the initial meeting between Crook and the Poncas, he wrote: "This conference is inserted verbatim merely to show the cruel and senseless ways in which the Government of the United States deals with the Indian tribes who confide in its justice or trust themselves to its mercy." Bourke's diary covers his time not only on ...
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Date: October 15, 2007
Creator: Bourke, John Gregory
Partner: UNT Press

Patchwork Paraphrasing in 'The Clensyng of Mannes Sowle: Comparing Pepys 2125 to Bodley 923

Description: Poster presentation for the 2012 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas. This presentation discusses research on an excerpt of a confessional narrative in an early 15th century manuscript known as Cambridge, Magdalene College, Pepys 2125 against 'The Clensyng of Mannes Sowle', found in Oxford, Bodleian Library, Bodley 923.
Date: April 19, 2012
Creator: DeLaughter, Amy & Smith, Nicole D.
Partner: UNT Honors College

Story of Baadil Jamaal by Laila Khan

Description: Recording of Laila Khan reciting the story of “Baadil Jamaal” in the Hunza dialect of Burushaski. In this popular story there is a king with seven sons, and he promises the sons that when they are to marry, he will let them marry whoever they wish. One son then travels to the side of a mountain where he lost his arrow, and meets an otherworldly woman named Baadil Jamaal. He insisted that he would not leave unless she married him, and he waited for a hundred years, and his family, missed him very much. One day Baadil Jamaal agreed to be the prince’s bride, and they went back to the kingdom, where the fairy restored the youth of the King and his wife.
Date: May 29, 2010
Creator: Khan, Laila
Partner: UNT College of Information

Story of Baadil Jamaal by Laila Khan

Description: Recording of Laila Khan reciting the story of “Baadil Jamaal” in the Hunza dialect of Burushaski. In this popular story there is a king with seven sons, and he promises the sons that when they are to marry, he will let them marry whoever they wish. One son then travels to the side of a mountain where he lost his arrow, and meets an otherworldly woman named Baadil Jamaal. He insisted that he would not leave unless she married him, and he waited for a hundred years, and his family, missed him very much. One day Baadil Jamaal agreed to be the prince’s bride, and they went back to the kingdom, where the fairy restored the youth of the King and his wife.
Date: Spring 2009
Creator: Khan, Laila
Partner: UNT College of Information