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Ceramics Without Clay: An Exploration into Potential

Description: Investigating the behavior, function and appearance of ceramic materials has proven an enduring point of interest throughout my education. In learning about the vast range of the earth-yielded materials and their physical manifestations in states ranging from wet to dry to fired, I have found myself excited and challenged to seek out ways to expand their presentation. My attention has been repeatedly drawn to the class of ceramic materials that frequently get classified as “glaze ingredients.” Understanding the structural and visual qualities of these minerals and compounds was an interest whether I was making tableware, tiles, or sculpture. For the purposes of this paper, I propose to deal expressly with the physical art-making considerations of material and process as they relate to my work in ceramics. By directing my focus as such, I hope to center my work on a concern that became evident to the art world upon the display of Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain: material equals content.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Hart, Christopher David
Partner: UNT Libraries

Your metal in action.

Description: A series of blue-tinted photographs with captions depicts the use of metal for war weapons and ships.
Date: 1943
Creator: United States. War Department. Bureau of Public Relations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Your metal is on the attack : keep it coming!

Description: Color illustration of soldiers wading from a ship or boat through water and storming a beach. Behind them is a tank about to exit a ship. More ships, a small boat, and explosions can be seen on the water in the background.
Date: 1943
Creator: Sewell, Amos, 1901-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The avenger's shadow : more metal for U.S. planes, tanks, guns.

Description: Black and white drawing. A caricatured Japanese soldier holding a smoking gun stands over a fallen man labeled "U.S. pilot". In the distance is a pagoda. At right is a large shadow of a man's head and and shoulders, which appears to be descending over the Japanese soldier. He wears a miner's helmet and the words "more metal for U.S. planes, tanks, guns" appear on his shadow.
Date: 1943
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Back 'em up with more metal.

Description: Color poster of at least seven soldiers in uniforms and helmets surrounding an anti-aircraft gun which is firing. Other guns can be seen firing in the background.
Date: 1942
Creator: Stoops, Herbert Morton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Make his nightmare come true!

Description: Charcoal caricature drawing of a sleeping Hideki Tojo, apparently having a nightmare. In his thoughts, an airplane, a missle, and a tank are coming toward him, and a miner stares down at him, saying, "Now we're gonna mine and smelt still more metal for tanks an' ships an' guns".
Date: 1943
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A menace we must beat! "We need your metal to help fight the U-boat!"

Description: Black and white drawing. In the distance, a boat or ship is sinking, with smoke rising from it. In the foreground is a periscope rising from the water. A Nazi symbol can be seen under the surface of the water below it. Nearby, an apparently wounded man floats on a piece of debris on the water. At the upper right is a portrait of Admiral Nimitz and the quoted caption.
Date: 1943
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tomorrow may be too late!

Description: Black and white cartoon of Hideki Tojo and an American miner. Each has a caption in a bubble above his head. Tojo is trying to influence the miner to slack off on his work but the miner is not influenced.
Date: 1942
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

We need more metal for more weapons.

Description: Poster in green and white tones with green-tinted photographs. Poster shows a series of photographs of military equipment with captions describing the types of metals used for each. Photographs include: an army truck, a battleship, a B-24 bomber plane, a searchlight, an anti-aircraft gun, and tanks.
Date: 1943
Creator: United States. Army.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

We're free to choose-- : this today, or this tomorrow.

Description: Black & white cartoon drawing with two frames. The top frame shows a radio announcer in the foreground and four miners in helmets in the background. The radio announcer mentions the importance and responsibility of miners to preserve liberty. The bottom frame shows Hitler holding a whip and threatening three weary miners who are forced to work long hours.
Date: 1943
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Win with tin.

Description: Poster in red and black tones. A series of graphic illustrations with captions provide instructions for preparing empty tin food cans for recycling.
Date: 1942
Creator: United States. War Production Board. Bureau of Industrial Conservation.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Your metal is their might!

Description: Three helmeted soldiers operate a large machine gun. Shells from the gun shower downward below it. Smoke from an explosion is seen in the background.
Date: 1943
Creator: Schlaikjer, Jes Wilhelm, 1897-1982.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Your metal saves our convoys : keep it coming!

Description: In the foreground, a man stands on a platform on a ship, shouting through a megaphone at several other men on deck who are loading and firing a large cannon-like weapon toward the sea. Other ships can be seen in the background.
Date: 1943
Creator: Helck, Peter, 1893-1988.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Your metals fight on every front!

Description: A series of six brown-tinted photographs with captions depicting the uses of metals in the armed forces during World War II. Describes the use of metals for vehicles, airplanes, bombs, and guns.
Date: 1943
Creator: United States. Army.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Unlock the door-- quick!

Description: Black and white cartoon of a soldier and a miner standing in front of a wooden door with an oversized padlock on it. The padlock represents a shortage of metal for military equipment which is locked behind the doors. The miner holds a large key labeled "More Ore". The soldier tells him that only he can unlock the doors.
Date: 1942
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Here's why we need more metal to win this war.

Description: Poster features a series of six black & white photographs on a black background. The photographs are of military weapons, vehicles, aircraft, and a ship. Each photograph has a caption describing the amount of copper, zinc, and lead used to manufacture the equipment shown.
Date: 1942
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Homemaker's war guide.

Description: Chart with columns providing illustrated suggestions for supporting the war effort. Colors used are red, blue, black/gray and white. Topics include conserving, storing, and reusing food, textiles, rubber, and metals, and instructions for taking protective measures in case of attack, and for participating in wartime community organizations. Centered at top of the poster is a graphic image representing women in various work and military uniforms, standing with airplanes, ambulances, a car, and a tank. The "homemaker" is highlighted at center and is represented wearing an apron, holding a saucepan, standing inside a red house.
Date: 1942
Creator: United States. Office of War Information. Division of Public Inquiries.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department