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Effects of Psychoeducation on Opinions about Mental Illness, Attitudes toward Help Seeking, and Expectations about Psychotherapy

Description: The effect of psychoeducation on opinions about mental illness, attitudes toward help seeking, and expectations about psychotherapy were investigated. One group served as a control, one group read a written lecture on information about mental illness, and one group read a written lecture on information about psychotherapy. The control group, and experimental groups immediately after reading the lecture, completed demographic information, Attitudes Toward Help Seeking-Short Form, Expectations About Counseling-Brief Form, Nunnally Conceptions of Mental Illness Questionnaire, and three College Adjustment Scales (Depression, Anxiety, Self Esteem). Participants were asked to complete the same measures four weeks after the initial assessment. Results: No significant improvement in attitudes toward help seeking was demonstrated in either experimental group, at either time of testing. Expectations about psychotherapy were significantly improved in both experimental groups, which remained significant at Time 2. Opinions about mental illness demonstrated an immediate significant improvement in attitudes with the mental illness lecture group, however this effect did not remain at Time 2. The psychotherapy lecture group did not have significantly improved opinions about mental illness at either time of testing. The control group did not produce any significant changes between Time 1 and Time 2 testing. Experimental group scores demonstrated similarity with those who had previous experience with psychotherapy. No relationship was found between level of adjustment and attitudes toward help seeking, expectations about psychotherapy, or opinions about mental illness at either time of testing.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Gonzalez, Jodi Marie
Partner: UNT Libraries

Evaluation of the Preparation for Adult Living Training Program for Severely Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents in a Residential Treatment Center

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the Preparation for Adult Living skills training program by measuring the learning gains and learning outcomes of students participating in the training. The quasi-experimental posttest control group design was used. A treatment sample of twelve students received the Preparation for Adult Living training. A nontreatment sample was selected by matching the characteristics of educational and reading level and the gender of twelve students with no previous independent living skills training with those of the treatment sample. Students in the treatment sample were tested for learning gains using the Preparation for Adult Living Test. Both the treatment and nontreatment sample were tested using the post-training Preparation for Adult Living Scale to determine the level of their learning outcomes. The Preparation for Adult Living Test results were analyzed using the t-test for correlated samples of pretests and posttests. The t-test for independent samples was used to analyze the Preparation for Adult Living Scale results to determine the students' learning outcomes. A Pearson r correlation coefficient was calculated for Preparation for Adult Living Scale scores to determine if a relationship existed between employment and the life coping skills of the treatment sample. The findings indicated that no learning gains were made during the training, but that the training had an impact on the students' post-training life-coping skills. A strong relationship was found between the specific life-coping and employment skills of the treatment sample. Investigation of the reliability and validity of the Preparation for Adult Living Test and Scale instruments was recommended.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Hunter, Robert A. (Robert Allan)
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Script: McCune hearing]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about a sanity hearing for Billy George McCune, who was previously convicted for assaulting a Polytechnic housewife.
Date: October 18, 1951
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Script: News Briefs - Firebug]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about the arrest of a mentally ill boy named John Maurice Jordan who admits to setting 17 fires in Houston.
Date: January 27, 1954
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Script: News briefs

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering two news stories. The first story is about the wife of a missionary in Arabia stricken with polio and transported back home to Fort Worth with help from the National Polio Foundation. The second story is about a Fort Worth woman confessing to drowning her young daughter.
Date: February 13, 1951
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Script: Bank robbery]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about a mental hospital escapee captured shortly after attempting to rob a Dallas bank.
Date: June 18, 1953
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Script: Child*slayer ruled insane]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about the sanity hearing of Mrs. Carroll Sinclair, who was indicted for killing her four-year-old son. Sinclair was ruled insane by a jury.
Date: June 11, 1954
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

A Critical and Analytical Evaluation of Experimental Data Currently Available Concerning the Therapeutic Use of Music

Description: The problem which is reported in these pages represents an attempt to bring into one work a critical and analytical survey of the material currently available in the field of music therapy. There is such a wealth of new material, especially since the termination of the war, that the necessity for a new and up-to-date compilation of material is evident. The objective of this thesis is to collect general information as to the theory and practices of music therapy, rather than to secure for purposes of statistical analysis great numbers of detailed items in regard to a technique that has not yet been carried to a point where it can be standardized. However, this compilation does include some actual experiments which have been conducted in hospitals with the object of determining the effect on physical and mental patients of certain musical compositions and certain instruments.
Date: August 1946
Creator: Perry, Mary Aileen
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Use of Music as a Therapeutic Agent in Connection with and as an Aid to Hospitalized Mental Patients

Description: The increasing importance of music as a therapeutic benefit in mental hospitals has prompted this study. Numerous unscientific reports and papers concerned with music therapy have been published; however, material based upon controlled experiments and results is available which has proven valuable in the study of this growing aid for mental patients. The reference material in the following chapters has been organized and limited to objective reports produced by those who have devoted their interest and time to the facts about the use of music as a therapeutic agent in mental hospitals.
Date: January 1952
Creator: McClung, Marjorie C. (Marjorie Catherine)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The History of Alcoholism Treatment in the United States

Description: The treatment of alcoholism has had a unique historical development in the United States. This study provides a chronology of how the problem of alcoholism was defined and handled during various time periods in United States history. The process that evolved resulted in an abstinence based, comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of alcoholism as a primary disease based on the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous. This treatment modality, that developed outside of established medicine, is currently used by the majority of treatment providers. Seven individuals who have been actively involved in alcoholism treatment were interviewed. In addition to archival research, biographies and autobiographies were examined to gain a broad perspective. Because alcoholism is both a collective and an individual problem an effort was made to include a microsociological frame of reference within a broad sociological view. Alcoholism, or inebriety, was first perceived as a legal and moral problem. By the end of the 19th century, inebriety was recognized as an illness differing from mental illness, and separate asylums were established for its treatment. Alcoholism is currently accepted and treated as a primary disease by the majority of social institutions, but the legal and moral implications remain. National Prohibition in the early part of the 20th century targeted alcohol instead of the alcoholic delaying any progress toward treatment which was made in the 19th century. The advent of Alcoholics Anonymous brought the first widely accepted hope for alcoholics. The treatment process that developed utilized the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous in a setting of shared recovery which has been difficult to quantify. In 1970 the allocation of federal funds for treatment and research brought the involvement of new disciplines creating both conflicts and possibilities. Alcoholism recovery has elucidated the connection of mind, body, and spirit.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Brent, Suzanne S. (Suzanne Stokes)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, Volume 47, Number 2, Summer 2016

Description: Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling is the official publication of the National Rehabilitation Counseling Association (NRCA). The JARC is published quarterly, Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter. JARC is a journal of opinion and research in professional rehabilitation counseling and addresses the needs of individuals employed in a wide variety of work settings and with wide-ranging professional interests. This edition of JARC sought to highlight international trends and in the current issue (Vol. 46, No.2), the following articles were included: -Employment of Latinos with Disabilities: The Impact on Academic/Work Self-Concept. (Alicia B. Becton, Jerome Fischer, Noel A. Ysasi, Abdoulaye Diallo, & Yuleinys Castillo) - Career and Technical Education, Work Study, & School Supervised Work: How Do They Impact Employments with Disabilities. (Alfred W. Daviso, Robert M Baer, Robert W. Flexer, & Richard Meindl) -VR Service Patterns and Employment Outcomes of Transition-Aged Youth. (Gina Oswald) - Using DSM-5 and ICF Tools to Understand Client Cultural and Environmental Perspectives (Raymond C. Ortega & William E. Garner) -Positive Psychology and Hope as Means to Recovery from Mental Illness. (Jinhee Park & Roy K. Chen).
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: Summer 2016
Creator: National Rehabilitation Counseling Association (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Prediction of Elopement from an Open Psychiatric Hospital

Description: The hypotheses investigated were (1) as measured by a test of impulse control, elopers are more impulsive than non-elopers, and (2) as measured by a test of impulse control, males are more impulsive than females. The Self-Report Test of Impulse Control (STIC) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) were administered to 76 female and 40 male patients at the time of admission to an open psychiatric hospital. Of these, 20 females and 10 males eloped. The first hypothesis was only partially supported. The second hypothesis was not supported. The BIS was found to be a potential predictor of elopers. The data also suggested that males elope later than females.
Date: December 1974
Creator: Schwalm, Wayne Samuel
Partner: UNT Libraries

Stress Level, Background Variables, Premorbid Health Ratings, and Severity of Psychological Disorders Using DSM-III-R Ratings

Description: This study predicted that individuals diagnosed as having higher levels of stress, based upon DSM-III-R, Axis IV ratings, would also be diagnosed as having more severe forms of mental illness. Conversely, it predicted that individuals with higher premorbid health ratings, according to DSM-III-R, Axis V, would be diagnosed as having less severe forms of mental illness. Highly significant correlations were found between stress ratings and severity of disorder. Significant inverse relationships were also found between Axis V ratings and disorder severity. Additionally, several other demographic variables were significantly correlated with severity of disorder.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Eads, Julie A. (Julie Anne)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Passive and Active Avoidance Learning in Depressives

Description: In order to aid in the understanding of the personality components that contribute to the symptoms of depression, the learning process of persons labeled as depressed was examined. Twenty female subjects who were either receiving or being evaluated for psychotherapy participated in this study. Based on MMPI and DACL scores, 10 depressed and 10 nondepressed subjects were placed in avoidance learning situations. An active avoidance situation required making the correct button press to avoid a sounding buzzer; the absence of the button-pressing response constituted a passive avoidance situation, There was no significant difference between the two groups in learning across avoidance conditions, Depressives were found 'to be less persistent in responding than were nondepressives. Results were explained as supporting a learned helplessness model of depression.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Weeks, Randall E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Symptoms of Childhood Depression as Factors in Children's Reading Difficulties

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate symptoms of childhood depression as factors in elementary school age children's reading difficulties. Subjects for study included children who evidenced symptoms of depression from among those referred to the Pupil Appraisal Center (PAC) at North Texas State University for reading difficulties between October, 1983, and April, 1985. The Weinberg Affective Scale (WAS), a screening device for childhood depression, was used to identify the subjects for this study. Using document analysis as the research approach, the researcher examined, recorded, and categorized referral and evaluation statements made by parents, teachers, counselors, and reading specialists the subjects1 PAC files that described symptoms of childhood depression. Also analyzed were diagnostic test data from the evaluation reports of PAC counselors and reading specialists.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Werner, Patrice Holden
Partner: UNT Libraries

When Patients Threaten to Kill: A Texas View of Tarasoff

Description: A serious problem confronts the psychologist whose patient threatens, within the privacy of a therapy session, to inflict violent harm upon some third person. Therapists in Texas face a risk of unjust legal liability because of a lack of widely accepted, clearly and fully articulated standards. A questionnaire was submitted to Texas psychologists and Texas judges of mental illness courts. It involved a hypothetical case of a patient who threatened to kill his girlfriend. The hypothesis that no consensus exists at present among psychologists or judges appears to be supported by the data. Comparisons are made of the attitudes of psychologists and judges. Correlations between psychologist attitudes and certain demographic and practice variables are reported. The need for new legislation in Texas concerning legal liability of therapists for the violent behavior of patients is discussed. Proposed legislation for Texas is set out. Among its important features are (1) recognition that continued therapy is itself a protective strategy and (2) establishment of good faith as the standard by which the behavior of the therapist is to be judged.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Morgan, Minor Latham
Partner: UNT Libraries

Judgment of Contingency and the Cognitive Functioning of Clinical Depressives

Description: Twenty-four psychiatric staff, 24 clinically depressed inpatients, and 24 nondepresssed schizophrenic patients at a state psychiatric facility completed five tasks under either reward or punishment conditions. Each task consisted of 30 trials of pressing or not pressing a button to make a light appear. Monetary reinforcement was contingent on light onset for the final ten trials of each task. Cash incentives for judgment of control accuracy were added for Tasks 3, 4, and 5. Cognitive functioning was evaluated on each task by measuring expectancy, judgment of control, evaluation of performance, and attribution. Mood and self- esteem were measured before and after the procedure. No significant differences were observed across mood groups for expectancy of control or judgment of control accuracy. Subject groups also did not differ in the attributions they made or in how successful they judged their performances to be. They set realistic, attainable criteria for success which were consistent with relevant conditional probabilities. Subjects in reward gave themselves more credit for task performance than subjects in punishment gave themselves blame for comparable performances. Punishment subjects demonstrated more stable, external attributions than those in reward. Across tasks, subjects overestimated when actual control was low and underestimated when actual control was high. Contrary to the "depressive realism" effect described by Alloy and Abramson (1979), clinical depressives did not display more accurate judgments of control than did nondepressives. All subjects appeared to base their control estimates on reinforcement frequency rather than actual control. Subjects showed a type of illusion of control for high frequency, low control tasks. Presumably, success in turning the light on led them to assume that their actions controlled light onset. Comparison to previous subclinical studies suggests a possible curvilinear relationship between judgment of control accuracy and level of psychopathology, with mild depressives displaying relatively greater accuracy than ...
Date: August 1990
Creator: Cobbs, David Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Depressed and Nondepressed Students: Judgment of Control, Defensiveness, and Cognitive Functioning

Description: Ninety-six undergraduates were given four tasks under either reward or punishment conditions. Each task consisted of 20 trials of pressing or not pressing a button to make a light come on. Monetary reinforcement was contingent on light onset for all tasks and on accuracy of judgment of control for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th tasks. Cognitive processing was comprehensively assessed for each task by measuring expectancy, judgment of control, perception of environmental stimuli, evaluation of performance, attribution, and reinforcement value. Results showed that subjects were more accurate in moderate than in low control and in low than moderate frequency. Females were more accurate in perceiving environmental stimuli and had lower self-esteem, lower efficacy expectancies, and higher self-rated reinforcement values for monetary incentives than males. Low defensives were accurate in expectancy of control, judgment of control in punishment, and estimation of environmental stimuli. Subjects in reward were more accurate in perceiving reinforcing events and they gave themselves more credit for task performance than subjects in punishment gave themselves blame for comparable performance. Those in punishment had more stable and external attributions and were more anxious, depressed, and hostile. Depressives and nondepressives reacted differently to the monetary contingency on accuracy of judgment of control. Depressives showed overestimation of control immediately after initiation of this contingency, then gradually decreased their estimation until they were relatively accurate on the last task. Nondepressives showed more accurate judgment of control immediately after monetary contingency on accuracy, but returned to overestimation on subsequent tasks. These findings gave partial support to Alloy and Abramson (1979) in that mild depressives became increasingly accurate in judgment of control across tasks. Female depressives, compared to female nondepressives, were less accurate in perceiving environmental stimuli and gave themselves less credit in reward. Although depressives did not set a particularly high criterion for ...
Date: August 1987
Creator: Tang, So-kum Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Examination of the Perceptual Asymmetries of Depressed Persons as Mediated by Hypnosis

Description: This study evaluated the role of asymmetric processing of information in depression. Depression has been hypothesized to involve a deficit in the global processing of information (Tucker, 1982). This type of global processing has been manipulated through the use of hypnosis by Crawford and Allen (1983). In the current study, a 3 x 2 ANCOVA design allowed the comparison of three groups of subjects on their performance on a perceptual task measuring global perception. The task chosen was designed by Navon (1977) and consisted of designs which differed on global or local features. The groups were screened with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, and the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, yielding 46 subjects divided into three groups of right-handed males and females. The experimental group consisted of high susceptible depressives from the community. The controls were one group of high susceptible normals and one of low susceptible depressives. All groups performed the Navon task under both waking and hypnosis conditions. Analysis of the results revealed a main effect for group (F(2, 86) = 9.60, p < .01) on the global scores. In addition, high social desirability scores predicted slower presentation times. However, hypnosis was not effective in creating a significant change in performance on the dependent measure. The results are discussed as support for the hypothesized differences between depressives and normals. Differences between the measures used in the present study and that of Crawford and Allen suggest that hypnosis may mediate imagery at a conceptual level but not at the level of the primary visual-perceptual system.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Wilson, Lucy Erma
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Script: Ledge rescue]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about a foiled suicide attempt by a Houston postal worker on the ledge of a Dallas hotel, along with a plane crash at a boat company in Grand Prairie that killed two workers.
Date: December 31, 1954
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Learned Helplessness, Attribution, and Clinical Depression

Description: To test predictions of learned helplessness theory and attribution theory, depressed and nondepressed subjects were exposed to a word-association task in a skill, chance, or no-instructional-set condition. Subjects were asked to make attributions of success and failure to four factors--ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck--and rate expectancy of success. The predictions of both theories were only partially confirmed. Difficulties relating to the experimental design may account for the failure of nondepressed/skill subjects to show greater expectancy change. As predicted, all subjects in the chance condition displayed similar expectancy changes. Also as predicted, nondepressed subjects did not rate effort as being the least influential factor. Depressed subjects, however, rated all factors equivalently, instead of rating effort least influential.
Date: December 1977
Creator: Toppins, John D.
Partner: UNT Libraries