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Developmental Recommendations for a Selected Texas Black College

Description: The problem of this study is the design of a comprehensive developmental profile for a Texas black college, based upon qualitative academic and nonacademic differences evident through comparison with a predominantly white institution of similar size and purpose. The purposes of the study are first, to identify features which differ between the selected black institution and the more highly rated white college. Second, to analyze differences discovered, and recommend a comprehensive program for upgrading the excellence level of the substandard institution.
Date: August 1972
Creator: MacKenna, David Warren, 1938-
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Development and Validation of an Inventory of Academic Requirements for Criminal Justice Education

Description: The purpose of this study was to develop a concept of higher education which would be responsive to the needs of criminal justice. The study sought first to identify from both the popular and professional literature the principal roles of the three main component areas of criminal justice (police, courts, and corrections). Second, the study sought to identify those fundamental areas of knowledge which would support the common criminal justice roles; and, finally, the study sought to formulate the essential items of knowledge thus developed into an inventory of academic requirements for criminal justice education and to validate that inventory by subjecting it to the scrutiny of a panel of experts for their evaluation.
Date: May 1972
Creator: McDowell, Charles P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Plan of Christian Higher Education for Arkansas Baptists

Description: The primary problem in this study was to develop a comprehensive long-range plan for Arkansas Baptists to use as a guide in meeting their needs in the field of Christian higher education. These needs were viewed in two ways: 1. Need as related to the purposes and philosophy of Christian higher education of Southern Baptists; 2. Need as related to the number of persons to be served.
Date: June 1957
Creator: Kirkman, Ralph Everett
Partner: UNT Libraries

Theological Higher Education in Cuba: A Case Study of the Eastern Cuba Baptist Theological Seminary

Description: This research attempted to provide a comprehensive overview of the Eastern Cuba Baptist Theological Seminary within the context of theological education in Cuba and the Cuban Revolution. Three major purposes directed this research. The first one was historical: to document and evaluate the rise, survival and achievements of the Eastern Cuba Baptist Theological Seminary, which has continued its mission through extraordinary political opposition and economical difficulties. The second major purpose was institutional: to gain insight into Cuban seminary modus operandi. The third purpose of the study was to identify perceived needs of the seminary. This study sought to provide information that can facilitate a better understanding of Cuban Christian theological higher education. The Eastern Cuba Baptist Theological Seminary was founded in the city of Santiago the Cuba on October 10, 1949 by the Eastern Baptist Convention. This seminary exists for the purpose of training pastors for the Eastern Baptist Convention. The school offers a four-year program leading to a bachelor in theology degree. The Eastern Cuba Baptist Convention experienced the same oppression from the communist revolution as the rest of the evangelical denominations during the sixties and seventies. The worst period for the convention and the Eastern Cuba Baptist Theological Seminary started in 1965 when many important people were recruited to work at the Military Units to Aid Production (UMAP). Fidel Castro recognized in 1991 that the Cuban Communist Party erroneously made atheism its religion. Although the Cuban communist regime never issued an antireligious policy, in subtle ways Christians suffered the consequences of the religious ideological conflict. Nevertheless, today the Eastern Cuba Baptist Theological Seminary operates independently and without the direction of the Cuban government. Communism and Christianity have learned to live together in Cuba even though they started with difficulties. Theological education in Cuba not only survived the negative ...
Date: August 2003
Creator: Esqueda, Octavio J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Higher Education: United States' and Other Countries' Strategies for Attracting and Funding International Students

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In the years following September, 11, 2001, the United States experienced its first drop in the number of international students coming to the United States in over 30 years. The United States tightened its immigration policy during this time, which may have made it more difficult for foreign nationals, including international students, to apply for a visa and, subsequently may have fueled the perception that the United States is unwelcoming. While enrollment numbers have started to rebound, they have not returned to pre-September 11 levels. This testimony is based on ongoing and published GAO work. It includes themes from a June 2007 testimony on challenges in attracting international students. It also includes ongoing work to review other countries' efforts to attract and fund international students."
Date: June 19, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Stronger Federal Oversight Needed to Enforce Ban on Incentive Payments to School Recruiters

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In 1992, Congress banned schools participating in federal student aid programs from paying commissions, bonuses, or other financial incentives to individuals based on their success in enrolling students or securing their financial aid. The ban applies to all postsecondary schools, including private for-profit, public, and private nonprofit schools. Congress instituted this incentive compensation ban to eliminate deceptive recruiting practices and to protect federal student aid funds from fraud and abuse. However, we recently found evidence of deceptive or fraudulent recruitment practices at certain postsecondary schools in which school officials misrepresented programs or encouraged students to falsify their financial aid applications to obtain federal student aid. Questions have been raised about whether schools are consistently acting in the best interest of students during the recruitment process, and whether the federal investment in student aid is adequately protected. The U.S. Department of Education (Education) is responsible for monitoring schools participating in federal student aid programs and enforcing compliance with the incentive compensation ban. Education has the authority to assess fines or take other actions against schools found violating the ban. In the Higher Education Opportunity Act, Congress mandated that GAO conduct a study on Education's oversight of the incentive compensation ban. In February 2010, we issued a report which provided information on incentive compensation violations substantiated by Education from January 1998 through December 2009, the nature of these violations, and the names of the institutions involved. This report provides additional information on Education's oversight of the ban during this time period. Specifically, we examined (1) how Education monitors schools for potential violations of the incentive compensation ban, and (2) the extent to which Education has used its authority to enforce the incentive compensation ban."
Date: October 7, 2010
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Veteran Students Received Similar Amounts of Title IV Aid As Nonveterans but More Total Aid with GI Benefits

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Over the past decade, average college tuition and fees increased between 20 and 38 percent, depending on the type of institution. This rising cost of college affects all students--both veteran and nonveteran students--who rely on a mix of family resources, grants, scholarships, loans, and work-study to finance their education. Students may face particular hardships when the cost of attendance outpaces students' available resources. For example, some lenders recently have tightened the eligibility criteria for obtaining student loans in response to problems in financial markets. In fiscal year 2007, the Department of Education (Education) provided $82 billion in financial aid in the form of grants, loans, and work-study programs under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, to 11 million students and their families. The primary Title IV aid programs include Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, and campus-based aid programs. Veterans also may be eligible for federal financial aid from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). VA awarded about $2 billion in Chapter 30 education benefits under the Montgomery GI Bill1 (Chapter 30 GI benefits) to more than 300,000 veteran students in fiscal year 2007. In 2002, we reported that veteran students were awarded similar amounts of Title IV aid as nonveteran students, and veterans' total federal aid was greater when Chapter 30 GI benefits were included. Congress asked about whether this has changed, resulting in veterans receiving less federal financial aid. To address this question, Congress asked us to determine (1) how the amount of Title IV financial aid awarded to veteran students compares with that awarded to nonveteran students, (2) how higher education institutions allocate Title IV financial aid among veteran and nonveteran students, and (3) how federal agencies and higher education ...
Date: June 20, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Impact of Financial Aid on Persistence: Application of the Financial Nexus Model

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the financial nexus between college choice and persistence for full-time, first-time, first-year freshman college students. The theoretical framework of this study was the financial nexus construct developed by St. John, Paulsen, and Starkey (1996) and Paulsen and St. John (1997). This is the first study to apply the financial nexus construct to full-time, first-time, first-year freshman population; the first to examine baccalaureate/comprehensive and doctoral/research institutions in both public and private sectors separately. The results of this study found that (1) overall, it is slightly evident that there is a financial nexus between college choice and persistence among full-time, first-time, first-year freshman students; (2) the nexus between college choice and persistence may be different by the Carnegie Classification, and (3) the pattern of the direct effects of financial variables (i.e., tuition and financial aid) on persistence was different from the previous results. Unlike in the previous studies, tuition increases appeared to have a positive effect on the enrollment of full-time, first-time, first-year freshman students attending institutions of all Carnegie Classifications. The result suggests that price may reveal a "quality effect" and that higher tuition institution may signal higher quality. In both public and private institution students, students of comprehensive/baccalaureate institutions were more sensitive to tuition than those of research/doctoral institution. This result may raise fundamental questions about the tuition price responsiveness of full-time, first-time, first-year freshman students. The results indicate that public students were more sensitive to grants than private students. Also, students attending comprehensive/ baccalaureate institutions were more sensitive to grants than those of research/doctoral institutions in both sectors.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Hwang, Dae-Yeop
Partner: UNT Libraries

Hazard mitigation and disaster preparedness planning at American Coastal University: Seeking the disaster-resistant university.

Description: This study employed a qualitative case study method to evaluate the efforts of one university to conduct hazard mitigation and disaster preparedness planning activities and used the Federal Emergency Management Agency framework and selected writings of sociologist and disaster researcher E.L. Quarantelli as models for evaluating the institution's approach. The institution studied was assigned a fictitious name and the identities of the study participants withheld in order to protect the integrity of the institution's planning efforts and its personnel. The study utilized a 92-item questionnaire, field interviews, and review and analysis of documentary materials provided by the institution for data collection purposes. Pattern-matching techniques were applied to identify themes and trends that emerged through the course of data collection. The results indicate the institution has developed an organizational culture that is broadly responsive to and engaged in disaster preparedness planning at multiple levels in a manner generally consistent with principles identified in select writings of Quarantelli. Results further indicate the institution has engaged in identifying hazard mitigation priorities but not in a manner consistent with that advocated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency in its publication entitled Building a Disaster-Resistant University.
Date: December 2008
Creator: Osburn, Toby W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Higher Education: Trustee Arrangements Serve Useful Purpose in Student Loan Market

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on student loan trustee arrangements, focusing on the: (1) number and cost of trustee arrangements and their shared characteristics; (2) benefits and protections afforded the federal government through use of trustee arrangements; and (3) effect of trustee arrangements on market participation and the availability of student loans."
Date: September 25, 2000
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Approaches to Attract and Fund International Students in the United States and Abroad

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Following September 11, 2001, the number of international students coming to the United States dropped for the first time in over 30 years. While enrollments have rebounded, the U.S. image has declined in the Muslim world and elsewhere. To improve global attitudes toward America, the U.S. government funds higher education for international students to facilitate exchanges, promote understanding among peoples in different countries, and build capacity in developing nations. To provide insight on how higher education is used to advance public diplomacy and development assistance goals, we examined (1) the objectives the United States and selected peer governments seek to advance through higher education for international students and the approaches they employ to attract international students, and (2) the characteristics of major U.S. and peer government programs that fund higher education for international students to support public diplomacy and development goals. GAO collected information from the United States, Australia, China, the European Commission, Germany, and the United Kingdom."
Date: April 30, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Institutions' Reported Data Collection Burden Is Higher Than Estimated but Can Be Reduced through Increased Coordination

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) is the federal government's core postsecondary data collection program. Approximately 6,800 postsecondary schools are required to complete annual IPEDS surveys on topics including enrollment, graduation rates, and finances. As policymakers have sought additional data to increase accountability in postsecondary education, the number and complexity of questions on the IPEDS surveys have increased. GAO was mandated to examine: (1) the time and cost burden for schools completing the IPEDS surveys, (2) options for reducing this burden, and (3) the potential benefits and challenges of collecting additional graduation rate data. To do this, GAO interviewed staff from 22 postsecondary schools, reviewed existing estimates of the IPEDS time and cost burden, interviewed officials at the Department of Education (Education) and Office of Management and Budget, and interviewed higher education associations and higher education software providers."
Date: August 13, 2010
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Correlates of Number of Minority Faculty, Minority Student Organizations, Diversity Course Offerings, and Geographic Location to Minority Student Enrollment in Texas Colleges

Description: This study examined the correlates between the dependent variables African-American and Hispanic student enrollment in Texas public higher education to the independent variables institution type, education region, faculty demographics, curricular offerings and student organizations. Data for African-American (n = 124,000) and Hispanic enrollment (n = 314,000) in all Texas public higher education institutions (n = 109) for the 2008 academic year were examined. Significant results, using a statistical significance of p = .005, were reported for two of the variables. A correlation of Pearson's r = .946 and statistical significance of p = .000 was observed between African-American student enrollment and the percentage representation of African-American faculty in the same institution. A correlation of Pearson's r = .982 and statistical significance of p = .000 was observed between Hispanic student enrollment and the percentage representation of Hispanic faculty in the same institution. The results of this study found significant relationships between the presence of African-American and Hispanic faculty and enrollment of African-American and Hispanic students. Recommendations are made for exploring these findings in further detail.
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Date: August 2010
Creator: Kraus, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries

Partnership for Enhancing Developing Countries' Capacity in Participating in Global Knowledge Production and Use

Description: Poster discussing a partnership for enhancing developing countries' capacity in participating in global knowledge production and use. This poster highlights some of the contributing factors that enhance the capacity of African institutions to play active roles in the current global knowledge economy (in terms of information and knowledge creation, access, use and reuse).
Date: July 2013
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw; Assefa, Shimelis & Rorissa, Abebe
Partner: UNT Libraries

Higher Education: Issues Related to Law School Cost and Access

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In order to participate in federal student financial aid programs, law schools must be accredited by an agency recognized by the Department of Education (Education). Accreditation is intended to ensure that schools provide basic levels of quality in their educational programs, and Education recognizes those accrediting agencies that it concludes can reliably determine the quality of education provided by the schools and programs they accredit. The American Bar Association's (ABA) Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar serves as the main accrediting agency for law schools, and students who attend one of the 200 ABA-accredited law schools can take the bar examination in any jurisdiction in the country. There are also several law schools that are accredited by other Education-recognized accrediting agencies such as the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Graduates of some of these non-ABA-accredited law schools are eligible to take the bar examination in their own state, but may not do so nationwide. The ABA's accreditation standards focus on a number of issues, including schools' facilities, student support services, faculty, admissions practices, and graduates' passage of the bar exam. Concerns have been raised about how some of these accreditation standards may affect the cost of attendance and minority access. In 2007, we reported on the ABA's process for accrediting law schools and questions that had been raised about the process. In this report, in response to a mandate in the Higher Education Opportunity Act, we examine the following questions: (1) How do law schools compare with similar professional schools in terms of cost and minority enrollment? (2) What factors, including accreditation, may affect the cost of law school? (3) What factors, including accreditation, may affect minority access to ...
Date: October 26, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Tuition Continues to Rise, but Patterns Vary by Institution Type, Enrollment, and Educational Expenditures

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Higher education has increasingly become critical to our nation's cultural, social, and economic well-being, with 90 percent of the fastest-growing jobs in the knowledge economy requiring some postsecondary education. While a college graduate can expect to earn, on average, approximately $1 million more over the course of his or her working life than those with a high school diploma, most students and their families can expect to pay more on average for college than they did just a year ago. Moreover, many are concerned that the increases in the cost of college may be discouraging large numbers of individuals, particularly minority and low-income individuals, from pursuing higher education. The topic of college affordability continues to be an issue of great concern. Various policymakers, national associations, and philanthropic foundations have documented the growth in college tuition and its potentially adverse effects on access to higher education and rates of degree completion. Recent years have witnessed the introduction of many federal-, state-, and institution-level initiatives aimed at curbing tuition increases, yet tuition continues to rise. Congress asked GAO to provide information on trends in higher education enrollments, tuition and fees, and institutional expenditures on education- related services that students receive by addressing the following questions: (1) What have been the patterns in college enrollment over the past decade and do these patterns differ by race? (2) What have been the patterns in the types of schools students attend and do these patterns differ by race? (3) How much have tuition and fees increased over the past decade across different types of higher education institutions? (4) To what extent have increases in tuition and fees been associated with increases in spending by institutions on education?"
Date: November 28, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Challenges in Attracting International Students to the United States and Implications for Global Competitiveness

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "More international students obtain a higher education in the United States than in any other country, and they make valuable contributions while they are here. For those students returning home after their studies, such exchanges support federal public diplomacy efforts and can improve understanding among nations. International students have earned about one-third or more of all U.S. degrees at both the master's and doctoral levels in several of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. Yet recent trends, including a drop in international student enrollment in U.S. colleges and universities, and policy changes after September 11, 2001, have raised concerns about whether the United States will continue to attract talented international students to its universities. This testimony is based on ongoing and published GAO work. It includes themes from a September 2006 Comptroller General's forum on current trends in international student enrollment in the United States and abroad. Invitees to the forum included experts from the Congress, federal agencies, universities, research institutions, higher education organizations, and industry."
Date: June 29, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: More Information Could Help Education Determine the Extent to Which Eligible Servicemembers Serving on Active Duty Benefited from Relief Provided by Lenders and Schools

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "million members of the armed forces have been deployed in service to the United States. Congress enacted the Higher Education Relief Opportunities for Students (HEROES) Act to recognize the needs of those servicemembers who are deployed in the midst of pursuing postsecondary education or repaying student loans. GAO was asked to determine (1) how the Department of Education has implemented HEROES, (2) the policies and practices federal student loan lenders have in place to assist borrowers serving on active duty, and (3) the policies and practices postsecondary schools have to assist students who are serving on active duty. To address these objectives, GAO interviewed representatives from the nine largest Federal Family Education Loan program lenders, surveyed a random sample of postsecondary schools, and visited four colleges and universities."
Date: November 1, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher Education: Activities Underway to Improve Teacher Training, but Reporting on These Activities Could Be Enhanced

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "In 1998, Congress amended the Higher Education Act (HEA) to enhance the quality of teaching in the classroom by improving training programs for prospective teachers and the qualifications of current teachers. This report focuses on two components of the legislation: one that provides grants and another, called the "accountability provisions," that requires collecting and reporting information on the quality of all teacher training programs and qualifications of current teachers."
Date: December 11, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of the Recommendations of the Members of the North Texas Industrial Arts Association Relative to the Industrial Arts Programs of Eight State-Supported Institutions of Higher Learning

Description: The purpose of this thesis is two-fold: first, to study the current requirements for the baccalaureate degree in industrial arts in eight state-supported institutions; and second, to compare the recommendations of the members of the North Texas Industrial Arts Association with the existing programs in industrial arts in the state-supported institutions to determine what should constitute an adequate program for the prospective teacher in industrial arts.
Date: January 1965
Creator: Sebastian, Jimmy W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Arnspiger Value-Oriented Rationale and General Education for Student Self-Understanding and Continuous Self-Development

Description: The problem of this study was to describe a conceptual design for general education with interdisciplinary qualities leading to student self-understanding and continuous self-development. This study emerged out of the need to gain some insight into the causes of decline and/or abandonment of general education programs during periods of social disorganization, and to determine whether a relationship.exists between mounting social problems and the more intense kinds of problems experienced by college-age youth during these periods.
Date: August 1972
Creator: Preas, Mary Elizabeth Foster
Partner: UNT Libraries