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University-industry Alliances : A Study of Faculty Attitudes Toward the Effects of Alliances on the Governance and Operations of Institutions of Higher Education

Description: The central purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of faculty in applied sciences to the attitudes of faculty in liberal arts and other selected fields to determine if they differ significantly from each other in their perceptions of the effects of university-industry alliances on campus governance and operations. Secondary purposes were (a) to appraise the debate on alliances and the effects of alliances on academic values and (b) to contribute to the literature concerning alliances and their potential for improving higher education.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Abegunde, Olufemi
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Dr. Harold Schliechting collecting Algae]

Description: Photograph of Dr. Harold Schliechting of the North Texas Biology Department. In the image Dr. Schliechting is holding two pieces of science equipment to collect Algae. The background has a door in the very back with a closed cabinet to the left of the frame with shelves holding various items on the right.
Date: October 26, 1961
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Dr. Sherman, Chairman of Science Division]

Description: Photograph of Dr. Sherman, Chairman of the Division of Science at University of North Texas, and professor in the biology department. He is photographed sitting next to a lab sink wearing a lab coat and a bow tie. A collection of test tubes sit on the counter while other materials fill up the shelves above the sink. The window in the background reflects the camera's flash with a minimal view of the outside.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Photograph of Dr. Arthur Sampley]

Description: Photograph of Dr. Arthur Sampley of the North Texas English Department. He poses sitting resting his right arm on a desk with a closed door behind him. Wired hangers are seen on the right of the frame with another chair in the left background.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Faculty Attitudes Toward Residential and Distance Learning: A Case Study in Instructional Mode Preferences Among Theological Seminary Faculty

Description: Twenty-first century learners have bought into a cafeteria-style mentality for obtaining higher education that learning should be available at the student's convenience. Institutions that ignore this postmodern trend will likely find their applicant pools dwindling along with significant reductions in entering class sizes. Students will simply choose other schools able to provide respected, accredited, and useful learning which fits their busy lifestyles. Since 1987, Dallas Theological Seminary (Texas), a 76-year-old graduate school of theology in the conservative, evangelical, free-church movement, has offered distance learning classes in both extension and print-based delivery models. Because the faculty plays a pivotal role in the successful or unsuccessful implementation of online courses (McKenzie, Mims, Bennett, & Waugh, 2000), the present study uncovered the attitudes of full-time, graduate theological faculty at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS) regarding distance learning and the likelihood of faculty to adopt this delivery innovation. Bruce Manning's (1976) Trouble-Shooting Checklist (TSC) for Higher Education Institutions was the instrument used in the study. The TSC is a nonparametric test designed to uncover differences between the observed and expected levels of acceptance that a department, program, or institution possesses regarding change toward distance learning in contrast to residential learning. The checklist's two major purposes are to provide an overall norm-referenced, predictive score estimating the organization's likelihood of adopting and implementing an innovation and to profile the strengths and weaknesses of an organization's environment (culture) relative to the adoption and implementation of innovations. Five scales provide a comprehensive understanding of the organizational climate, personality and leadership characteristics of participants, communication pathways within the organization, the degree of sophistication or expertise within the organization, and the receptivity of the students. An official administration of the instrument was conducted involving all full-time faculty at DTS. Frequency counts, percentage distributions, and the chi-square goodness-of-fit statistic were used to ...
Date: May 2003
Creator: Scott, Benjamin G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attitudes of Faculty Members in the Open Universities in Thailand toward Media Technologies

Description: This study was to compare the attitudes in terms of sex and current position, and to investigate the attitudes of faculty members in Open Universities in Thailand toward media technologies in terms of age, education, and teaching experience. A 25-statement questionnaire, with a reliability of 0.91 for measuring attitudes, was used to gather the data. The total stratified random sampling population was 300 faculty members in the Open Universities, 272 from Ramkhamhaeng University (RU) and 28 from Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University (STOU). The returned rate of the questionnaire was 244 (81.33%), 219 (80.51%) from RU and 25 (89.28%) from STOU. The t test was used to test significant differences between males and females, and administrators and faculties. The one-way analysis of variance was used to test significant differences among the levels of age, education, and teaching experience. The results of this study indicated that the attitudes of faculty members in Open Universities in Thailand toward media technologies were not significantly different in terms of sex, age, education, teaching experience, and current position. The faculty members considered the use of (1) closed circuit television as the form of media which enhanced teaching quality and student learning in virtually all instructional contents, aided instructors, improved instruction, and was readily available; (2) television as the form of media which made the content of the course more clear for students, promoted students* independent study, increased student motivation, was helpful to instructors in improving instruction, and was cost-beneficial; (3) radio as the form of media most frequently used in the past; (4) overhead projector as the form of media most manageable in the teaching process; (5) laser disc player as the form of media too complex for efficient classroom use; and (6) interactive video systems as the form of media most inhibiting to instructors.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Suteera Suriyawongse
Partner: UNT Libraries