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Analyzing the Persistence of Referenced Web Resources with Memento [Presentation]

Description: Presentation for the 2011 International Conference on Open Repositories. This presentation discusses the results of a study into the persistence and availability of web resources referenced from papers in scholarly repositories. Memento makes it possible to automate discovery of archived resources and to consider the time between the publication of the research and the archiving of the reference URLs.
Date: June 2011
Creator: Sanderson, Robert; Phillips, Mark Edward & Van de Sompel, Herbert
Partner: UNT Libraries

Austin Fanzine Project: An Overview

Description: Presentation for the 2013 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. This presentation discusses the Austin Fanzine Project, an institutional-independent project intended to improve access to the documents of a recently-historical subculture -- the Austin, Texas underground music scene of the 1990s. The project has also blossomed into a sandbox for creative experimentation with digital archives and digital humanities methods and tools.
Date: September 20, 2013
Creator: Hecker, Jennifer
Partner: UNT Digital Scholarship Cooperative (DiSCo)

Prospects for Research Data Management

Description: Paper included in a report for the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) on research data management and the DataRes Project. This chapter highlights some of the most provocative findings of the DataRes Project on the topic of research data management in higher education and possible scenarios for the future and the implications of these scenarios.
Date: November 2013
Creator: Halbert, Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Sustaining the Digital Humanities : Host Institution Support Beyond the Start-up Period

Description: As more and more scholars experiment with digital methods and with building digital collections, what measures are in place to make sure that the fruits of these labors are kept vital for the long term? Library directors and chief information officers sense that there is interest on the part of faculty, but does this mean they need to invest in a digital humanities center and hire new staff or just reconfigure the people and resources they already have? First and foremost, what does university leadership seek to gain from such an investment? This study seeks to address the fate of digital research resources - whether they be digital collections of scholarly or other materials, portals, encyclopedias, mapping tools, crowdsourced transcription projects, visualization tools, or other original and innovative projects that may be created by professors, library, or IT staff. Such projects have the potential to provide valuable tools and information to an international audience of learners. Without careful planning and execution, however, they can also all too easily slip between the cracks and quickly become obsolete.
Date: June 18, 2014
Creator: Maron, Nancy L. & Pickle, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries

ETD Lifecycle Management Tools Manual

Description: The IMLS-funded Lifecycle Management of ETDs project has researched, developed, and/or documented a suite of modular Lifecycle Management Tools for curating electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). The project targeted the following curation activities: Virus Checking, Format Recognition, Preservation Event Record-Keeping, and Simple ETD & Metadata Submission. This manual describes how to implement Lifecycle Management Tools for those activities. The manual is written for ETD Program Managers. It describes a general rationale and use case for each curation activity mentioned above in the context of an ETD program. While the technical and administrative implementations of ETD programs are diverse, this manual includes generalized recommendations for where and when to deploy the tools in an ETD submission workflow. ETD Program Managers are encouraged to coordinate with the full range of stakeholders (including the graduate schools, libraries, campus IT, and vendors) to adapt tools to their implementation.
Date: September 29, 2014
Creator: Schultz, Matt; Eisenhauer, Stephen & Krabbenhoeft, Nick
Partner: UNT Libraries

Emulation & Virtualization as Preservation Strategies

Description: Between the two fundamental digital preservation strategies, migration has been strongly favored. Recent developments in emulation frameworks make it possible to deliver emulations to readers via the Web in ways that make them appear as normal components of Web pages. This removes what was the major barrier to deployment of emulation as a preservation strategy. Barriers remain, the two most important are that the tools for creating preserved system images are inadequate, and that the legal basis for delivering emulations is unclear, and where it is clear it is highly restrictive. Both of these raise the cost of building and providing access to a substantial, well curated collection of emulated digital artefacts beyond reach. This book advocates that if the above mentioned barriers can be addressed, emulation will play a much greater role in digital preservation in the coming years. It will provide access to artefacts that migration cannot, and even assist in migration where necessary by allowing the original software to perform it. The evolution of digital artefacts means that current artefacts are more difficult and expensive to collect and preserve than those from the past, and less suitable for migration. This trend is expected to continue. Emulation is not a panacea. Technical, scale and intellectual property difficulties make many current digital artefacts infeasible to emulate. Where feasible, even with better tools and a viable legal framework, emulation is more expensive than migration-based strategies. The most important reason for the failure of current strategies to collect and preserve the majority of their target material is economic; the resources available are inadequate. The bulk of the resources expended on both migration and emulation strategies are for ingest, especially metadata generation and quality assurance. There is a risk that diverting resources to emulation, with its higher per-artefact ingest cost, will exacerbate ...
Date: 2015
Creator: Rosenthal, David S. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Peer-to-Peer Approach to Review Compliance with Trustworthy Repository Audit and Certification (TRAC)

Description: This poster explains the collaboration between the libraries at the University of North Texas and University of Florida in order to complete the Trusted Repository Audit Checklist (TRAC). The TRAC is an assessment to demonstrate good practice as a trusted digital repository to its communities. The poster was featured at the 11th International Conference on Knowledge Management in Osaka Japan.
Date: November 2015
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw; Phillips, Mark Edward; Waugh, Laura; Tarver, Hannah & Krahmer, Ana
Partner: UNT Libraries

After the Harvest: Preservation, Access, and Researcher Services for the 2016 End of Term Archive

Description: This presentation discusses the End of Term Archive and methods for identifying and selecting in-scope content (including using registries, indices, and crowdsourcing URL nominations ["seeds"] through a web application called the URL Nomination Tool), new strategies for capturing web content (including crawling, browser rendering, and social media tools), access models including both an online portal as well as research datasets for use in computational analysis, and preservation data replication between partners using new export APIs and experimental tools developed as part of the IMLS-funded WASAPI project.
Date: December 13, 2016
Creator: Bailey, Jefferson; Grotke, Abigail & Phillips, Mark Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Making the Most Out of Collaboration: Partnerships & Grant Applications for Long-Term Preservation

Description: This presentation discusses the collaboration between Tarleton Library and Stephenville Public Library for a grant to digitize two early newspapers previously only available on microfilm, and collaborative partnership models for digital preservation of materials and grant applications.
Date: December 16, 2016
Creator: Castillo, Amy
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

TRAIL @ UNT: Update

Description: Presentation for the 2017 Technical report Archive and Image Library (TRAIL) Annual Meeting. This presentation provides an update on the TRAIL Collection at UNT Libraries, including current metadata remediation initiatives.
Date: May 9, 2017
Creator: Phillips, Mark Edward & Rosenbeck, Craig
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Packaging Twitter Data for the Repository

Description: Presentation within a panel on social media during the Third International Workshop on Web Archiving and Digital Libraries at the 2016 Joint Conferece for Digital Libraries. This presentation discusses the inclusion of twitter data within the UNT Data Repository.
Date: June 23, 2016
Creator: Phillips, Mark Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Modular Curation for ETD Repositories

Description: This paper discusses the Lifecycle Management of ETDs project led by the University of North Texas (UNT) and funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This paper explains the research methodology the project took to evaluate these various tools, IRs and related submission systems; share findings; and discuss how these findings have solidified implementation improvements for the above mentioned curation technologies (Clam, AV, JHOVE/JHOVE2, DROID & FITS).
Date: July 11, 2013
Creator: Schultz, Matt; Eisenhauer, Stephen & Krabbenhoeft, Nick
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chronicles in Preservation: Building Institutional Capacity in Digital Preservation

Description: Poster presented at the 2013 iPres Conference. The poster discusses the Chronicles in Preservation project, which evaluates how to improve the preservation readiness of digitized and born-digital newspapers on a spectrum of essential to optimal levels of conformance to digital preservation standards.
Date: September 2013
Creator: Schultz, Matt; Phillips, Mark Edward; Krabbenhoeft, Nick & Eisenhauer, Stephen
Partner: UNT Libraries