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An Examination of the Percussion Writing in the Chamber Works of George Crumb, 1960-1980 with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Bergsma, Kurka, Miyoshi, Niimi, Takemitsu, and Others

Description: In this study, the unique style of percussion writing in the chamber works of George Crumb, written between 1960 and 1980, is examined. The principal aspects examined within this study include: the extended instrumental techniques, the use of percussion within the musical imagery, soloistic treatment, compositional and notational procedures, and specific performance problems pertaining to the chamber work Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death.
Date: August 1993
Creator: LedBetter, Robert B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Clarinet in Chamber Music from Mozart through Brahms

Description: It is the purpose of this thesis to present a study of the development of writing for the clarinet in chamber music during the period from Mozart (1756-1791) through Brahms (1833-1897). The first part is a brief history of the clarinet showing the stages of development of the instrument from its beginning to its present form and also surveys the field of chamber music in general, with special attention to the chamber music for the clarinet, and to the performers for whom many of these works were written.
Date: August 1950
Creator: Farris, John Alexander
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Critical Evaluation of Two-Piano Music Available in American Publication

Description: Th study of two-piano music was prompted by an active interest in that field and a recognized need for a knowledge of its literature on the part of the writer, who, for the past five years, has devoted most of her time to two-piano work. After careful investigation it becomes apparent that no other study similar to this has yet been made, and it is hoped that it may be helpful to others with interests in common. Much remains to be done and further study would prove profitable. More information might be gained from interviews with prominent duo-pianists, as well as from examination of foreign catalogues and of recital programs given in Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, and similar music centers.
Date: August 1945
Creator: Bridenthal, Dorothy
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Most Expressionist of All the Arts: Programs, Politics, and Performance in Critical Discourse about Music and Expressionism, c. 1918-1923

Description: This dissertation investigates how German-language critics articulated and publicly negotiated ideas about music and expressionism in the first five years after World War I. A close reading of largely unexplored primary sources reveals that "musical expressionism" was originally conceived as an intrinsically musical matter rather than as a stylistic analog to expressionism in other art forms, and thus as especially relevant to purely instrumental rather than vocal and stage genres. By focusing on critical reception of an unlikely group of instrumental chamber works, I elucidate how the acts of performing, listening to, and evaluating "expressionist" music were enmeshed in the complexities of a politicized public concert life in the immediate postwar period. The opening chapters establish broad music-aesthetic and sociopolitical contexts for critics' postwar discussions of "musical expressionism." After the first, introductory chapter, Chapter 2 traces how art and literary critics came to position music as the most expressionist of the arts based on nineteenth-century ideas about the apparently unique ontology of music. Chapter 3 considers how this conception of expressionism led progressive-minded music critics to interpret expressionist music as the next step in the historical development of absolute music. These critics strategically—and controversially—portrayed Schoenberg's "atonal" polyphony as a legitimate revival of "linear" polyphony in fugues by Bach and late Beethoven. Chapter 4 then situates critical debates about the musical and cultural value of expressionism within broader struggles to construct narratives that would explain Germany's traumatic defeat in the Great War and abrupt restructuring as a fragile democratic republic. Against this backdrop, the later chapters explore critics' responses to public performances of specific "expressionist" chamber works. Chapter 5 traces reactions to a provocative performance of Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony, op. 9 (1906) at the Berlin Volksbühne in February 1920. Chapter 6 examines the interplay of musical-aesthetic and sociopolitical issues in critical ...
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Date: August 2016
Creator: Carrasco, Clare
Partner: UNT Libraries

Quintet for Woodwinds

Description: The purpose of writing the quintet for Woodwinds is to produce composition for woodwind ensemble containing elements of significant musical form. Much of the quintet music. by composers such as, Reicha and Taffanel is characterized by pure virtuosity of style and lack of significant musical form. The Quintet for Woodwinds utilizes the conventional instrumentation for a woodwind quintet, that is, flute, oboe, clarinet (Bb), Horn in F,, and bassoon. In the Third Movement (Playfully) the piccolo is to be used as an alternate instrument with the flute.
Date: January 1956
Creator: Hutchison, Warner, 1930-
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Poetic Ideal in the Piano Music of Franz Liszt: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Music by Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Brahms, and Contemporary European and North American Composers

Description: The dissertation consists of four recitals: one chamber music recital, two solo recitals, and one lecture recital. The chamber music program included a trio with the violin and cello performing with the piano. The repertoire of all of the programs was intended to demonstrate a variety of types and styles of piano music from several different historical periods. The lecture recital, "The Poetic Ideal in the Piano Music of Franz Liszt," was an attempt to enter a seldomexplored area of Liszt's musical inspiration. So much has been written about the brilliant and virtuosic compositions which Liszt created to demonstrate his own technical prowess that it is easy to lose sight of the other side of his creative genius. Both as a composer and as an author, Liszt reiterated his belief in the fundamental kinship of music and the other arts. The visual arts of painting and sculpture were included, but he considered the closest relationship to be with literature, and especially with poetry.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Lawhon, Gladys Louise, 1911-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Faculty, Student and Guest Artist Recital: 2012-01-31 - Linda Di Fiore, mezzo-soprano and Jennifer Glidden, soprano and Kyle Siddons, baritone and Mark Miller, violin and Ute Miller, viola and Carol Harlos, cello and Ed Smith, vibraphone

Description: A faculty and guest artist recital performed at the UNT College of Music in Voertman Hall.
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Date: January 31, 2012
Creator: Di Fiore, Linda; Glidden, Jennifer; Siddons, Kyle; Miller Mark; Miller, Ute; Harlos, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Music Library

Thema med Variationer, Opus 40, by Carl Nielsen: A Lecture Recital Two Solo Recitals Including Compositions of W. A. Mozart, F. Schubert, F. Chopin, A. Casella, and R. Muczynski A Chamber Music Recital Featuring Compositions for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, by W. A. Mozart, J. Brahms F. Busoni and A. Uhl

Description: The lecture recital, "Thema med Variationer, Opus 40, By Carl Nielsen" presented a discussion of the composer's general background and the characteristics of his style. Specific points made were related to the Thema med Variationer; the discussion was followed by a performance of the work in its entirety. In addition to the lecture recital, three other recital programs were organized and public concerts presented to provide the platform for the works studied. Two of these programs were of solo piano music and one was of chamber music with the clarinet and viola in partnership with the piano. All programs were recorded on magnetic recording tape. The spoken portion of the lecture recital in written form is filed with the recordings as a part of this dissertation.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Di Piazza, Gabriel, 1935-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chamber music for children

Description: This study is a progressive series of string quartets for children ages six to eight. A picture and a story for the child accompany each of the twenty lessons. The stories are written about animals, birds, and incidents that exist in the child's world. They are designed to arouse associations between familiar subjects or incidents and unfamiliar problems at hand.
Date: August 1948
Creator: Cornelius, Marjory Lunt
Partner: UNT Libraries

The trumpet in chamber music during the 20th century

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to trace the history of the trumpet in chamber music through the first half of the 20th century. It aims to discuss the technical advances in the instrument and demonstrate the importance of the trumpet in this medium. Chamber music is defined, in this thesis, as all serious instrumental music for two or more instruments played with one instrument to a part. The selections have been chosen on the basis of recognized merit of the composer, the variety of instrumentation, and the availability of music.
Date: August 1958
Creator: Bauschka, Conrad Romuald
Partner: UNT Libraries

Alfredo Casella's Serenata, op. 46, A Performance Guide for the Ensemble and Trumpet Part

Description: Alfredo Casella's Serenata, op. 46 for clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, violin and cello is a composition that received great acclaim at the time of its conception, it is all but unknown to modern audiences and performers. The Serenata has several historical influences from the French and Italian Baroque and Classical periods. At present, there is limited scholarship regarding the Serenata op. 46. The first section of this study presents a survey of historical information, current literature and methods of examination. The second section compares movements of the Serenata op. 46 to other historical forms of similar design. The third section provides a performance guide for the trumpeter and ensemble. Implications and suggestions for performance of the composition are provided for the trumpeter. This performance guide provides the trumpeter and ensemble with performance information to help facilitate an informed performance.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Walker, Brian Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Prayer of Daniel: for flute (with alto flute), clarinet (with bass clarinet), violin, cello, doumbek, percussion, piano, bass-baritone voice, and men's chorus

Description: The Prayer of Daniel is a chamber piece in the style of an oratorio for vocal bass-baritone soloist, flute doubling on alto flute, B flat clarinet doubling on bass clarinet, violin, cello, piano, percussion on vibraphone and marimba, doumbek (a middle eastern drum), and men's chorus (TTBB). The approximate duration is thirty minutes. The text comes from the Old Testament book of Daniel, Chapter 9 verses 4 through 19. In these passages the prophet Daniel rends from his heart a prayer of repentance, mercy and forgiveness on the behalf of a fallen nation. The harmonic language of the composition combines both classical contemporary and jazz sonorities. The rhythmic language is drawn from the meter of the text, and is used to underscore the emotion of the prayer. These elements combine to form a rich music experience that conveys the penitent heart of the prophet Daniel.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Gutierrez, Jason
Partner: UNT Libraries

William Bolcom's Sonata for Violoncello and Piano (1989)

Description: Composer William Bolcom (1938-) has shown a remarkable capacity for incorporating disparate materials and combining them to create original compositions, while often using traditional genres and forms. This style has earned Bolcom the reputation as a leading composer of American postmodernism. This study provides a brief sketch of Bolcom's development as a postmodern composer, his repertoire for violoncello and piano, and it examines his compositional style as applied in his Sonata for Violoncello and Piano (1989). In the Sonata Bolcom applies a wide variety of musical vocabulary from serious and popular traditions. He juxtaposes contrasting ideas to create and resolve rhythmic, melodic and harmonic tensions and amalgamates concepts of three centuries of music history into one new integral work. All these disparate elements with classical, romantic, impressionist, expressionist, modernist and popular connotations are molded together to form a serious piece of musi c with a sense of humor. The three contrasting movements of the Sonata share many common rhythmic, melodic and harmonic traits. The movements form a congruent work of Classical and Romantic spirit, often reminiscent of Brahms' music, despite the mixed use of traditional, popular, and modernist musical languages.
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Date: August 2003
Creator: Janssen, Tido
Partner: UNT Libraries

Augeries, for Flute, Clarinet, Percussion and Tape: Aesthetic Discussion and Theoretical Analysis

Description: Augeries is a multi-channel electro-acoustic composition for flute, clarinet, percussion, and tape. It is intended to be diffused through an 8-channnel playback system. Inspired by the first four lines of William Blake's Augeries of Innocence, Augeries captures the qualitative aspects of Blake's poetry by presenting the listener with an equally aperspectival aesthetic experience. The small-scale structure reflected on the large-scale form - the infusion of vastness and expansiveness into the fragile and minute. Augeries incorporates techniques of expansion and contraction, metonymic relationships, dilation and infolding of time, and structured improvisation to create an experience that is designed to explore the notion of musical time, and to bring to the listener the sense of time freedom. The critical analysis suggests that the increase in the notions of musical time, the aesthetics with which they conform, and the new time forms created, encapsulate communicative significance. This significance exists within a horizon of meaning. Semiotics illuminates an understanding of the structuring techniques used to render time as an area of artistic play. Understanding the aesthetics and mechanisms through which these techniques can be used constitutes a shared horizon of meaning. The concepts of cultural phenomenologist Jean Gebser, as explicated in The Ever-Present Origin, are used to contextualize these notions, through a description of the various consciousness structures with specific attention to the space-time relationships. Of specific concern are the aperspectival manifestations in music in the twentieth century and beyond. Special emphasis is given to the area of electro-acoustic music, particularly spectral music. The theoretical analysis explores how the various techniques are used to create an aperspectival experience, and includes specific descriptions of the technique of refraction as metonymy, and pitch set analysis of the technique of expansion and contraction.
Date: May 2009
Creator: Gedosh, David
Partner: UNT Libraries

Three Pieces for Musicians and Computer: Rameaux, Nature Morte, Moiré.

Description: Three Pieces for Musicians and Computer implements a modular formal structure that allows the performers to experiment with the order and number of movements to arrive at their ideal combination. The piece is a collection of three solo works: Rameaux, Nature Morte, and Moiré for bass flute with b-foot, metal percussion (vibraphone, glockenspiel, and crotales), and clarinet (A and B-flat instruments) respectively. In addition to the original versions, an alternate version of each piece is included. The alternate versions add new performance elements to the original works: live electronics in Rameaux and Nature Morte and an acoustic quintet (flute, viola, percussion, piano and harp) in Moiré. These additions reframe the original works by introducing new harmonic, timbral, and formal connections and possibilities. The compositional process of Three Pieces relies on the notion of Germinal Elements, which are defined as the set of limited, distinct, and indivisible materials used in the creation of the work. Though Germinal Elements are indivisible, they undergo a type of developmental process through expansion and contraction, which is an increase or a decrease in the range or scope of any musical parameter (time, pitch, density, dynamic, duration, etc.) or set of parameters. Analysis of this cycle of works reveals a variety of recombinations of four GE's as well as processes of expansion and contraction applied to multiple parameters of each GE to generate formal relationships within and between works. Two electronics systems, the delay/harmonizer instrument and the live performance system are described both in technical and musical terms with specific examples given to show how the electronics influence and expand both the surface material and the formal structure of the work.
Date: December 2008
Creator: Welch, Chapman
Partner: UNT Libraries

Bohuslav Martinu: An Examination of Selected Chamber Music Involving the Clarinet

Description: The discussion dealt with stylistic influences, compositional techniques, and performance considerations of chamber music involving clarinet composed by Bohuslav Martinu and included a performance of three of his works: Quartet. for clarinet, horn, cello, and side drum, Madrigals for oboe, clarinet, and bassoon, and Sextet for flute, oboe, clarinet, two bassoons, and piano. The selections performed and discussed in the lecture show compositional growth of the composer through the three periods of his life in which he composed chamber music which included winds. These three time periods are 1923-40 during his residency in Paris, 1941-56 during his residency in the United States, and 1957 until his death in 1959 when he returned permanently to Europe.
Date: December 1997
Creator: Walzel, Robert L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Postcard from Cairo

Description: A Postcard from Cairo is a chamber work for three performers (flute/soprano saxophone, vibraphone/conga, and electric guitar) supported by stereo tape and two digital sequencers. The musical content is a montage of Arabian, Indian, Spanish, and Moroccan ethnic music, combined with avant-garde sounds. The score reflects a mixture of traditional and contemporary elements featuring extensive use of improvisation and repetition. Each player is required to coordinate his responses in a variety of ways. Cues are governed by an analog clock, and pulses are provided by the tape/sequencer background.
Date: December 1984
Creator: Luis, Paul R. (Paul Reinaldo)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Reflection

Description: The Reflection is a piece of chamber music that describes the human nature through the use of different "meanings" in music. By using various leitmotifs and different compositional techniques, the music becomes a helpful tool to reflect meanings. On the other hand, this piece uses one special idea, which is that the whole piece can be explained in terms of visual arts. Each primary motive represents a "primary color" that reflects various "moods" or "emotions." Through using combinations and mixtures of color, different "sceneries" are formed. Furthermore, The Reflection has three basic aspects: the function of transmitting messages through music; the exploration of different functions of fifth; and the emphasis of meaning, sound effect and timbre.
Date: December 1992
Creator: Wu, Yuk Yee
Partner: UNT Libraries