Search Results

Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States

Description: This brochure highlights a report that summarizes the science of climate change, and the impacts of climate change on the United States.
Date: June 2009
Creator: U.S. Global Change Research Program
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Climate Change and Ecosystems Summary of Recent Findings

Description: This fact sheet summarizes information from a recent assessment of possible adaptation options to protect climate-sensitive ecosystems in the United States.
Date: unknown
Creator: Climate Change Science Program (U.S.)
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

The State of the Hudson 2009

Description: This report describes the environmental quality of the Hudson River and its watershed, including issues such as pollution, population growth, and biodiversity. The report also describes the habitats of estuaries, watersheds, and rivers in general.
Date: 2009
Creator: New York (State). Hudson River Estuary Program.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan

Description: This action plan articulates the most significant ecosystem problems for the Great Lakes, and describes efforts to address them. The five areas are toxic substances, invasive species, health and pollution, wildlife and habitat preservation and restoration, and finally a component that covers accountability and evaluation.
Date: February 21, 2010
Creator: United States. Council on Environmental Quality.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ecoregion: Desert Arid

Description: This brochure describes the effects of climate change in the desert and arid regions of the United States.
Date: June 2009
Creator: U.S. Global Change Research Program
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Common Ground: Solutions for reducing the human, economic and conservation costs of human wildlife conflict

Description: This report deals with the conflicts between wildlife and human development. Three cases studies are included, in Namibia, Nepal and Indonesia, respectively. Each location has different problems and contexts, but in all three countries, human lives and economic livelihoods are at stake, as well as the loss of habitat of threatened species. The authors advocate a species conservation approach based on land use planning integrated with human needs in order continue sustainable development.
Date: May 2008
Creator: World Wildlife Fund
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries

Kew-Eliasch Review Consultation: Report to the Office of Climate Change

Description: This paper discusses the research tools used to create baseline data for carbon offset mechanisms. The paper explains vegetation survey methodologies with examples of their application in a variety of contexts. These range from rapid studies using remote sensing imagery, to full multiphase survey methods. The paper gives specific examples of how these methods are used to monitor deforestation and forest regeneration.
Date: unknown
Creator: Moat, Justin; Crouch, Charlotte; Milliken, William; Smith, Paul; Hamilton, Martin; Baena, Susana et al.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

From the Edge: Science to Support Restoration of Pacific Salmon

Description: According the preface, this report represents the scientific understanding of salmon and salmon declines in the year 2000. The report provides an overview of salmon population trends, and ways to aid in and measure recovery.
Date: November 2000
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Committee on Environment and Natural Resources.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Scientific Collections: Mission-Critical Infrastructure for Federal Science Agencies

Description: This report describes the nature and state of federally-held scientific collections which exist for scientific study to provide insight about historical trends in biodiversity, climate, and ecosystems.
Date: December 23, 2008
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Committee on Science, Interagency Working Group on Scientific Collections.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Biodiversity Loss, the Motivation Problem, and the Future of Conservation Education in the United States

Description: The purpose of this dissertation is to make sense of two sets of reactions. On the one hand, Americans can barely lift a finger to help threatened and endangered species while on the other, they routinely come to the aid of human victims of disaster. I argue that in contrast to cases of human tragedy, for the biodiversity crisis conservationists are faced not only with the familiar yet arduous task of motivating the American public to care for living other-than-humans, but they are also saddled with having to overcome the motivation problem of future ethics. The motivation problem consists in eliminating or bridging a motivational gap that lies between knowledge of the effects of our actions on future generations and action taken based upon such knowledge. The gap exists because motives that typically move people to action are either ineffective or unavailable. What is more, the gap influences not only our ability to care for future humans, but it affects our ability to care for future other-than-humans as well. Biodiversity loss is in fact a subset of the problem of future generations, an identification hitherto little appreciated. I argue that conservationists can overcome the motivational gap not by appealing directly to the value of species or biodiversity, both of which are temporally distant, abstract and general moral patients, but indirectly, by focusing on the concrete and particular lives of extant and near future moral patients. By applying techniques that have been developed to overcome the motivation problem as it pertains to distant future human generations, conservationists have additional resources to draw upon in their efforts to motivate American citizens to preserve biodiversity. This dissertation’s contribution to the fields of environmental philosophy and conservation biology is both theoretical and practical. It is theoretically significant to elucidate the nature of moral failure ...
Date: December 2011
Creator: Grove-Fanning, William
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparison of Bare Root vs. Potted Plants, Species Selection, and Caging Types for Restoration of a Prairie Wetland, and Quantitative Analysis and Descriptive Survey of Plant Communities and Associations at Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area (LLELA), Lewisville, TX

Description: Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area (LLELA) is an 809-hectare property in Denton County, TX. A study of the vegetation community identified 466 species in 104 families, with 25% of the species from only two families, Asteraceae and Poaceae. The property demonstrates the characteristics of an early successional community, dominated by weedy species. Prairie communities are dominated by Johnson grass and ragweed, with climax tall grass prairie communities only in areas that have been planted with native grass seed. Forest communities are similarly in an early successional stage, dominated by the hackberry-elm-ash alliance, with small remnants of native Cross Timbers found in isolated patches. Species richness and diversity were highest in the forests and lowest in the wetlands; evenness, though not different across ecosystems, demonstrated a strong seasonal component. The species list was compared with previously reported lists for Denton County, and 256 species identified had not been previously reported for the county. A wetland restoration study was conducted to determine if there was a difference in survival and growth between potted transplants with intact root systems and bare-root transplants. Two different mesh sizes were used for protection, and the success of the different caging was evaluated. Of eight species, only four survived through the second growing season. There was no significant difference in the success of the propagule types for Sagittaria latifolia. The treatments planted with intact root systems showed significantly higher growth and reproduction than the bare-root treatments for Eleocharis quadrangulata, Heteranthera dubia, and Vallisneria americana. There was no survival recorded in the coarse mesh cages, likely due to the presence of crayfish that are able to get through the coarser mesh and feed on the transplants.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Buckallew, Robin R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ecological Forecasting: Agenda for the Future

Description: This brochure outlines the economic importance of ecological forecasting, as well as the importance of ecosystems for sustainable development, land management, and recreation.
Date: unknown
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Subcommittee on Ecological Systems.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

The NSF Scientific Collections Survey: A Brief Overview of Findings

Description: This white paper describes the state of digital collections resulting from NSF funded research in biodiversity, ecology, environmental health, environmental education, and environmental resource management.
Date: March 17, 2009
Creator: National Science Foundation (U.S.)
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Bird Species and Climate Change: The Global Status Report: A synthesis of Current Scientific Understanding of Anthropogenic Climate Change Impacts on Global Bird Species Now, and Projected Future Effects

Description: This review seeks to provide a global overview of current effects of climate change on birds as well as a picture of future impacts. It provides a scientific assessment of current research data, achieved by surveying hundreds of research articles and reports on the topic.
Date: October 2010
Creator: Janice Wormworth BSc MA & Dr Karl Mallon BSc PhD
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Bird Species and Climate Change: The Global Status Report: A synthesis of current scientific understanding of anthropogenic climate change impacts on global bird species now, and projected future effects

Description: This review seeks to provide a global overview of current effects of climate change on birds as well as a picture of future impacts. It provides a scientific assessment of current research data, achieved by surveying hundreds of research articles and reports on the topic.
Date: October 2010
Creator: Janice Wormworth BSc MA & Dr Karl Mallon BSc PhD
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Marine Ecosystems and Global Change

Description: The ocean is a vital component of the metabolism of the Earth and plays a key role in global change. In fact, the oceans cover so much of the Earth's surface that our planet has been described as the Water Planet, and it could be argued that its most extensive ecosystems are marine. Marine ecosystems are inextricably involved in the physical, chemical, biological and societal processes of global change. It is impossible to describe and understand the Earth system without understanding the ocean, the special characteristics of the environment that it provides for life, the changes that it is undergoing and the manner in which these changes interact with the total Earth System. Understanding the functioning of marine ecosystems and how they respond to global change is also essential in order to effectively manage global marine living resources, such as fisheries. The GLOBEC project is an international response to the need to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations, from zooplankton to fish, that comprise a major component of oceanic ecosystems. GLOBEC's goal is to advance our understanding of the structure and functioning of such ecosystems, their major subsystems, and responses to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast the response of marine ecosystems to global change. This volume in the IGBP Science Series, "Marine Ecosystems and Global Change", gives topical examples of the scientifi c problems that GLOBEC is tackling, the innovative approaches adopted, and some selected scientific achievements. It has been written at a time when GLOBEC is in the mid-phase of its implementation. The ultimate achievements of GLOBEC research will be presented in a final synthesis at the end of the project.
Date: 2003
Creator: Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics Project (GLOBEC)
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation [Map]

Description: The Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map shows the types of vegetation that occur across the Arctic, between the ice-covered Arctic Ocean to the north and the northern limit of forests to the south. Environmental and climatic conditions are extreme, with a short growing season and low summer temperatures. As one moves southward (outward from map's center in all directions), the amount of warmth available for plant growth increases considerably.
Date: 2003
Creator: CAVM Team
Item Type: Map
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Climate Change on Agriculture, Land Resources, Water Resources, and Biodiversity in the United States

Description: This document is a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Products described in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan. The report describes how climate affects the design, construction, safety, operations, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and systems. The prospect of a changing climate raises critical questions regarding how alterations in temperature, precipitation, storm events, and other aspects of the climate could affect the nation's roads, airports, rail, transit systems, pipelines, ports, and waterways. Phase I of this regional assessment of climate change and its potential impacts on transportation systems addresses these questions for the region of the U.S. central Gulf Coast between Galveston, Texas and Mobile, Alabama.
Date: May 2008
Creator: U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research.
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries