Search Results

More copper-zinc-lead-- quick!

Description: A soldier holding a rifle talks to a miner holding a drilling tool. The soldier is gesturing behind him toward the ruins of a town, saying, "Give us metal so it won't happen here".
Date: unknown
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal makes might! : keep it coming!

Description: Navy and white poster has blue background with text at the top. There are six blue and white pictures in two rows of three depicting metal in use. Each picture has a caption at the bottom and a white border.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hit 'em with Copper, Zinc, Lead

Description: Black and white cartoon of Uncle Sam and a miner. Miner: "Gosh, I would like to take a crack at those Japs!" Uncle Sam: "You're doin' it every day - with every ton of ore you mine to make tanks, planes and guns"
Date: 1942
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A menace we must beat! "We need your metal to help fight the U-boat!"

Description: Black and white drawing. In the distance, a boat or ship is sinking, with smoke rising from it. In the foreground is a periscope rising from the water. A Nazi symbol can be seen under the surface of the water below it. Nearby, an apparently wounded man floats on a piece of debris on the water. At the upper right is a portrait of Admiral Nimitz and the quoted caption.
Date: 1943
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

We need more metal for more weapons.

Description: Poster in green and white tones with green-tinted photographs. Poster shows a series of photographs of military equipment with captions describing the types of metals used for each. Photographs include: an army truck, a battleship, a B-24 bomber plane, a searchlight, an anti-aircraft gun, and tanks.
Date: 1943
Creator: United States. Army.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Yanks are there! : the Army needs lumber for trucks.

Description: Color illustration of a long line of military trucks snaking their way through a mountainous area. At the very front of the picture is a soldier on a motorcycle, smiling, with his left arm raised in the air. In the truck behind him are other soldiers waving from the covered truck bed.
Date: 1943
Creator: Schmidt, Felix.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Your metals fight on every front!

Description: A series of six brown-tinted photographs with captions depicting the uses of metals in the armed forces during World War II. Describes the use of metals for vehicles, airplanes, bombs, and guns.
Date: 1943
Creator: United States. Army.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Unlock the door-- quick!

Description: Black and white cartoon of a soldier and a miner standing in front of a wooden door with an oversized padlock on it. The padlock represents a shortage of metal for military equipment which is locked behind the doors. The miner holds a large key labeled "More Ore". The soldier tells him that only he can unlock the doors.
Date: 1942
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Here's why we need more metal to win this war.

Description: Poster features a series of six black & white photographs on a black background. The photographs are of military weapons, vehicles, aircraft, and a ship. Each photograph has a caption describing the amount of copper, zinc, and lead used to manufacture the equipment shown.
Date: 1942
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lumber does its stuff --a long way from home.

Description: Poster consists of photographs and text in a purple-red tone. Six photographs depict the use of lumber by the U.S. armed forces in World War II: to build bridges, tents, and life rafts, and to ship supplies. Photos also illustrate how wooden shipping crates are re-used by field post offices and commissaries in the South Pacific.
Date: 1943
Creator: United States. War Department. Bureau of Public Relations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department