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U.S.-Vietnam Relations in 2010: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Description: This report looks at issues that impact the relationship between the U.S. and Vietnam such as: goals and interests by both countries in a bilateral relationship, economic and trade issues, human rights, U.S. foreign assistance to Vietnam, and recent Vietnamese political events.
Date: July 12, 2010
Creator: Manyin, Mark E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S.-Vietnam Relations in 2010: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Description: This report looks at issues that impact the relationship between the U.S. and Vietnam such as: goals and interests by both countries in a bilateral relationship, economic and trade issues, human rights, U.S. foreign assistance to Vietnam, and recent Vietnamese political events.
Date: August 6, 2010
Creator: Manyin, Mark E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Veterans Affairs: Health Care and Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

Description: This report provides an overview of health care services and disability compensation benefits available to Vietnam veterans, Children of Vietnam Era veterans, and non-Vietnam veterans exposed to herbicides. This is followed by a discussion of litigation pertaining to Navy veterans of the Vietnam Era who served offshore and were never physically present on Vietnamese soil. The report concludes with a discussion of epidemiologic research conducted to study the health effects of Agent Orange and dioxin exposure on Vietnam veterans.
Date: August 25, 2008
Creator: Panangala, Sidath Viranga & Weimer, Douglas Reid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Agent Orange/Dioxin Assistance to Vietnam

Description: This report discusses U.S. assistance to Vietnam for the environmental and health damage attributed to a dioxin contained in Agent Orange and other herbicides sprayed over much of the southern portion of the country during the Vietnam War, which remains a major issue in bilateral relations.
Date: November 13, 2015
Creator: Martin, Michael F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Veterans Affairs: Health Care and Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

Description: This report provides an overview of health care services and disability compensation benefits available to Vietnam veterans, Children of Vietnam Era veterans, and non-Vietnam veterans exposed to herbicides. This is followed by a discussion of the recent litigation pertaining to Navy veterans of the Vietnam Era who served offshore and were never physically present on Vietnamese soil.
Date: October 30, 2009
Creator: Panangala, Sidath V. & Weimer, Douglas R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Bridges of Vietnam: From the Journals of U. S. Marine Intelligence Officer

Description: As an intelligence officer during the Vietnam War, Fred L. Edwards, Jr., was instructed to visit every major ground unit in the country to search for intelligence sources—long range patrols, boats, electronic surveillance, and agent operations. “Edwards found time to keep a journal, an extremely well-written, sharply observed report of his adventures. Along with contemporary postscripts and a helpful historical chronology, that journal is a significant improvement on most Vietnam memoirs. It is the record of a Marine’s on-the-job education.”—Proceedings
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 15, 2001
Creator: Edwards, Fred L., Jr.
Partner: UNT Press

Three Days and Two Nights

Description: This novel of the Vietnam War examines the effects of prolonged stress on individuals and groups. The narrative, which is told from the points of view of four widely different characters, follows an infantry company through three days and two nights of combat on a small island off the coast of the northern I Corps military region. The story's principal themes are the loss of communication that contributes to and is caused by the background of chaos that arises from combat; the effect of brutal warfare on the individual spirit; and the way groups reorganize themselves to cope with the confusion of the battlefield. The thesis includes an explication of the novel, explaining some of the technical details of its production.
Date: August 1978
Creator: Lewis, Jay B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Donut Dolly: an American Red Cross Girl's War in Vietnam

Description: Donut Dolly puts you in the Vietnam War face down in the dirt under a sniper attack, inside a helicopter being struck by lightning, at dinner next to a commanding general, and slogging through the mud along a line of foxholes. You see the war through the eyes of one of the first women officially allowed in the combat zone. When Joann Puffer Kotcher left for Vietnam in 1966, she was fresh out of the University of Michigan with a year of teaching, and a year as an American Red Cross Donut Dolly in Korea. All she wanted was to go someplace exciting. In Vietnam, she visited troops from the Central Highlands to the Mekong Delta, from the South China Sea to the Cambodian border. At four duty stations, she set up recreation centers and made mobile visits wherever commanders requested. That included Special Forces Teams in remote combat zone jungles. She brought reminders of home, thoughts of a sister or the girl next door. Officers asked her to take risks because they believed her visits to the front lines were important to the men. Every Vietnam veteran who meets her thinks of her as a brother-at-arms. Donut Dolly is Kotcher’s personal view of the war, recorded in a journal kept during her tour, day by day as she experienced it. It is a faithful representation of the twists and turns of the turbulent, controversial time. While in Vietnam, Kotcher was once abducted; dodged an ambush in the Delta; talked with a true war hero in a hospital who had charged a machine gun; and had a conversation with a prostitute. A rare account of an American Red Cross volunteer in Vietnam, Donut Dolly will appeal to those interested in the Vietnam War, to those who have interest in the ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: November 15, 2011
Creator: Kotcher, Joann Puffer
Partner: UNT Press

Ground Pounder: a Marine's Journey Through South Vietnam, 1968-1969

Description: In early February of 1968, at the beginning of the Tet Offensive, Private First Class Gregory V. Short arrived in Vietnam as an eighteen-year-old U.S. Marine. Amid all of the confusion and destruction, he began his tour of duty as an 81mm mortarman with the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, which was stationed at Con Thien near the DMZ. While living in horrendous conditions reminiscent of the trenches in World War I, his unit was cut off and constantly being bombarded by the North Vietnamese heavy artillery, rockets, and mortars. Soon thereafter Short left his mortar crew and became an 81mm’s Forward Observer for Hotel Company. Working with the U.S. Army’s 1st Air Cavalry Division and other units, he helped relieve the siege at Khe Sanh by reopening Route 9. Short participated in several different operations close to the Laotian border, where contact with the enemy was often heavy and always chaotic. On May 19, Ho Chi Minh’s birthday, the NVA attempted to overrun the combat base in the early morning hours. Tragically, during a two-month period, one of the companies (Foxtrot Company) within his battalion would sustain more than 70 percent casualties. By September Short was transferred to the 1st Battalion 9th Marines (the Walking Dead). Assigned as an infantryman (grunt) with Bravo Company and operating along the DMZ and near the A Shau Valley, he would spend the next five months patrolling the mountainous terrain and enduring the harsh elements. At the end of his first tour, he re-upped for a second and was assigned to the 1st Marine Air Wing in Da Nang, where he had an opportunity to become familiar with the Vietnamese culture. Direct, honest, and brutal in his observations, Short holds nothing back in describing the hardships of modern warfare and our leaders’ illusions ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 15, 2012
Creator: Short, Gregory V.
Partner: UNT Press

The Twenty-five Year Century: a South Vietnamese General Remembers the Indochina War to the Fall of Saigon

Description: For Victor Hugo, the nineteenth century could be remembered by only its first two years, which established peace in Europe and France's supremacy on the continent. For General Lam Quang Thi, the twentieth century had only twenty-five years: from 1950 to 1975, during which the Republic of Vietnam and its Army grew up and collapsed with the fall of Saigon. This is the story of those twenty-five years. General Thi fought in the Indochina War as a battery commander on the side of the French. When Viet Minh aggression began after the Geneva Accords, he served in the nascent Vietnamese National Army, and his career covers this army's entire lifespan. He was deputy commander of the 7th Infantry Division, and in 1965 he assumed command of the 9th Infantry Division. In 1966, at the age of thirty-three, he became one of the youngest generals in the Vietnamese Army. He participated in the Tet Offensive before being removed from the front lines for political reasons. When North Vietnam launched the 1972 Great Offensive, he was brought back to the field and eventually promoted to commander of an Army Corps Task Force along the Demilitarized Zone. With the fall of Saigon, he left Vietnam and emigrated to the United States. Like his tactics during battle, General Thi pulls no punches in his denunciation of the various regimes of the Republic, and complacency and arrogance toward Vietnam in the policies of both France and the United States. Without lapsing into bitterness, this is finally a tribute to the soldiers who fell on behalf of a good cause.
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Date: March 15, 2002
Creator: Thi, Lam Quang
Partner: UNT Press

Hell in an Loc: the 1972 Easter Invasion and the Battle That Saved South Viet Nam

Description: In 1972 a North Vietnamese offensive of more than 30,000 men and 100 tanks smashed into South Vietnam and raced to capture Saigon. All that stood in their way was a small band of 6,800 South Vietnamese (ARVN) soldiers and militiamen, and a handful of American advisors with U.S. air support, guarding An Loc, a town sixty miles north of Saigon and on the main highway to it. This depleted army, outnumbered and outgunned, stood its ground and fought to the end and succeeded. Against all expectations, the ARVN beat back furious assaults from three North Vietnamese divisions, supported by artillery and armored regiments, during three months of savage fighting. This victory was largely unreported in the U.S. media, which had effectively lost interest in the war after the disengagement of most U.S. forces. Thi believes that it is time to set the record straight. Without denying the tremendous contribution of the U.S. advisors and pilots, this book is written primarily to tell the South Vietnamese side of the story and, more importantly, to render justice to the South Vietnamese soldier.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: November 15, 2009
Creator: Lâm, Quang Thi
Partner: UNT Press

Strategic Environmental Assessment and Adaptation to Climate Change

Description: This is one in a series of Advisory Notes that supplement the OECD/DAC Good Practice Guidance on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) (OECD/DAC 2006). The focus of this Advisory Note is to show how Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) approaches can help mainstream adaptation to climate change into strategic planning. It is used to integrate considerations related to climate change into national development or sectoral management planning or policymaking processes.
Date: October 2008
Creator: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Partner: UNT Libraries

Oral History Interview with C. G. Hausser, March 8, 1992

Description: Interview with C. G. Hausser, an army veteran and nurse. This interview includes his experiences as a nurse in Vietnam, 1970-71. He recounts: assignment to 12th Evacuation Hospital, Cu Chi; camp routine; treatment of battle wounds; morale; Viet Cong prisoners; communication with family; transfer to Quang Tri; and stateside adjustments.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: March 8, 1992
Creator: Houser, Cindy & Hausser, C. G.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Veterans Affairs: Health Care and Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

Description: This report provides an overview of health care services and disability compensation benefits available to Vietnam veterans, Children of Vietnam Era veterans, and non-Vietnam veterans exposed to herbicides. This is followed by a discussion of litigation pertaining to Navy veterans of the Vietnam Era who served offshore and were never physically present on Vietnamese soil. The report concludes with a discussion of epidemiologic research conducted to study the health effects of Agent Orange and dioxin exposure on Vietnam veterans.
Date: September 22, 2010
Creator: Panangala, Sidath Viranga & Weimer, Douglas Reid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S.-Vietnam Relations in 2010: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Description: This report looks at issues that impact the relationship between the U.S. and Vietnam such as: goals and interests by both countries in a bilateral relationship, economic and trade issues, human rights, U.S. foreign assistance to Vietnam, and recent Vietnamese political events.
Date: February 4, 2011
Creator: Manyin, Mark E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vietnam PNTR Status and WTO Accession: Issues and Implications for the United States

Description: Report discussing the role of the United States regarding the status of trade relations with Vietnam after its accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO). The report focuses on the issue of most-favored-nation (MFN) status, or normal trade relations (NTR) which conflicts with Title IV of the Trade Act of 1974. There is an overview of U.S.-Vietnam economic relations the Jackson-Vanik Amendment and Vietnam's NTR status, the WTO accession process in relation to Vietnam's status, the significance of the issues for both Vietnam and the United States, as well as other political and economic issues.
Date: August 2, 2006
Creator: Manyin, Mark E.; Cooper, William H. & Gelb, Bernard A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vietnamese Victims of Agent Orange and U.S.-Vietnam Relations

Description: This report examines various estimates of the effects of Agent Orange on Vietnam's people and environment, the history of U.S. policy on the issue, the current cleanup efforts in Vietnam, the various forms of assistance—including U.S. assistance—provided to people with medical conditions associated with dioxin exposure, and the implications for bilateral relations. It concludes with a brief discussion of possible congressional responses to the issue.
Date: August 29, 2012
Creator: Martin, Michael F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department