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High-Speed Load Distribution of the Wing of a 3/16-Scale Model of the Douglas XSB2D-1 Airplane with Flaps Deflected

Description: The tests reported herein were made for the purpose of determining the high-speed load distribution on the wing of a 3/16 scale model of the Douglas XSB2D-1 airplane. Comparisons are made between the root bending moment and section torsional moment coefficients as obtained experimentally and derived analytically. The results show good correlation for the bending moment coefficients but considerable disagreement for the torsional moment coefficients, the measured moments being greater than the analytical moments. The effects of Mach number on both the bending moment and torsional moment coefficients were small.
Date: February 5, 1947
Creator: Barnes, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel. Part III - Longitudinal-Control Characteristics TED No. NACA DE308, Part 3, Longitudinal-Control Characteristics, TED No. NACA DE308

Description: Tests have been conducted in the Langley high speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 to determine the stability and control characteristics of an 0,08-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The longitudinal-control characteristics of the complete model are presented in the present report with a limited analysis of the results.
Date: July 29, 1947
Creator: Kuhn, Richard E. & King, Thomas J., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel. Part IV - Aileron Characteristics TED No. NACA DE308, Part 4, Aileron Characteristics, TED No. NACA DE308

Description: Tests have been conducted in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 to determine the stability and control characteristics of an 0.08-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The aileron characteristics of the complete model are presented in the present report with a very limited analysis of the results.
Date: August 22, 1947
Creator: Goodson, Kenneth W. & Myers, Boyd C., II
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel. Part V - Wing-Alone Tests and Effect of Modifications to the Vertical Fins, Speed Brakes, and Fuselage TED No. NACA DE308, Part V, Wing-Alone Tests and Effect of Modifications to the Vertical Fins, Speed Brakes, and Fuselage, TED No. NACA DE308

Description: Tests have been conducted in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 to determine the stability and control characteristics of an 0.08-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The wing-alone tests and the effect of the various vertical-fin modifications, speed-brake modifications, and fuselage modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch and yaw are presented in the present paper with a limited analysis of the results. Also included are tuft studies of the flow for some of the modifications tested.
Date: October 10, 1947
Creator: Kuhri, Richard E. & Myers, Boyd C., II
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Longitudinal Characteristics of a Semispan Model of the Grumman Airplane Design 83 having a Sweptback Wing and of the Model with a Straight Wing as Determined from Wing-Flow Tests at Transonic Speeds, TED No. NACA DE337

Description: An investigation has been made by the NACA wing-flow method to provide information on the relative longitudinal characteristics of a straight and sweptback wing in the transonic speed range. Tests were made of a semispan model of the Grumman airplane design 83 (XFlOF) incorporating a wing swept back 42.5deg with reference to quarter-chord line and also of the model with the swept wing replaced by a straight wing similar to that of the XF9F airplane. The airfoil sections were symmetrical 64l-series, with thickness ratios of 12 percent for the straight wing and 10 percent for the sweptback wing parallel to the stream direction. Measurements were made of normal force, chord force, and pitching moment at various angles of attack with the two wings both with and without the empennage, and with the fuselage alone. The tests covered a range of effective Mach numbers at the wing of the model from 0.65 to 1.10.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Silsby, Norman S. & Kennedy, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Longitudinal Trim and Tumble Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane, TED NO. NACA DE311

Description: Based on results of longitudinal trim and tumble tests of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane, the following conclusions regarding the trim and tumble characteristics of the airplane have been drawn: 1. The airplane will not trim at any unusual or uncontrolled angles of attack. 2. The airplane will not tumble with the center of gravity located forward of 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. When the center of gravity is located at 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord and slats are extended and elevators are deflected full up, the airplane may tumble if given an external positive pitching moment. 3. The tumbling motion obtained will be readily terminated by deflecting the elevators full down so as to oppose the rotation. 4. The accelerations encountered during an established tumble may be dangerous to the pilot and, therefore, action should be taken to terminate a tumble immediately upon its inception. 5. Simultaneous opening of two wing-tip parachutes having diameters of 4 feet or larger and having drag coefficients of approximately 0.7 will effectively terminate the tumble. 6. Model results indicate that the pilot will not be struck by the airplane if it becomes necessary to leave the airplane during a tumble. The pilot may require aid from an ejection-seat arrangement.
Date: July 20, 1948
Creator: Bryant, Robert L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a Semispan Model of the XF7U-1 Tailless Airplane at Transonic Speeds by the NACA Wing-Flow Method, TED No. NACA DE307

Description: An investigation was made by the NACA wing-flow method to determine the longitudinal stability and control characteristics at transonic speeds of a semispan model of the XF7U-1 tailless airplane. The 25-percent chord line of the wing of the model was swept back 35 deg. The airfoil sections of the wing perpendicular to the 25-percent chord line were 12 percent thick. Measurements were made of the normal force and pitching moment through an angle-of-attack range from about -3 deg to 14 deg for several ailavator deflections at Mach numbers from 0.65 to about 1.08. The results of the tests indicated no adverse effects of compressibility up to a Mach number of at least 0.85 at low normal-force coefficients and small ailavator deflections. Up to a Mach number of 0.85, the neutral point at low normal-force coefficients was at about 25 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord and moved rearward irregularly to 41 or 42 percent with a further increase in Mach number to about 1.05. For deflections up to -8.0 percent, the ailavator was effective in changing the pitching moment except at Mach numbers from 0.93 to about 1.0 where ineffectiveness or reversal was indicated for deflections and normal-force coefficients. With -13.2 deg deflection at normal-force coefficients above about 0.3, reversal of ailavator effectiveness occurred at Mach numbers as low as 0.81. A nose-down trim change, which began at a Mach number of about 0.85, together with the loss in effectiveness of the ailavator, indicated that with increase in the Mach number from about 0.95 to 1.05 an abrupt ailavator movement of 5 deg or 6 deg first up and then down would be required to maintain level flight.
Date: September 29, 1947
Creator: Sawyer, Richard H. & Trant, James P., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-Lift Drag of the Grumman F9F-9 Airplane as Obtained by a 1/7.5-Scale Rocket-Boosted Model and by Three 1/45.85-Scale Equivalent-Body Models between Mach Numbers of 0.8 and 1.3, TED No. NACA DE 391

Description: Low-lift drag data are presented herein for one 1/7.5-scale rocket-boosted model and three 1/45.85-scale equivalent-body models of the Grumman F9F-9 airplane, The data were obtained over a Reynolds number range of about 5 x 10(exp 6) to 10 x 10(exp 6) based on wing mean aerodynamic chord for the rocket model and total body length for the equivalent-body models. The rocket-boosted model showed a drag rise of about 0,037 (based on included wing area) between the subsonic level and the peak supersonic drag coefficient at the maximum Mach number of this test. The base drag coefficient measured on this model varied from a value of -0,0015 in the subsonic range to a maximum of about 0.0020 at a Mach number of 1.28, Drag coefficients for the equivalent-body models varied from about 0.125 (based on body maximum area) in the subsonic range to about 0.300 at a Mach number of 1.25. Increasing the total fineness ratio by a small amount raised the drag-rise Mach number slightly.
Date: March 24, 1955
Creator: Stevens, Joseph E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Additional Results on the Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 0.05-Scale Model of the Convair F2Y-1 Airplane at High Subsonic Speeds

Description: Additional results on the static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics of a 0.05-scale model of the Convair F2Y-1 water-based fighter airplane were obtained in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.92. The maximum angle-of-attack range (obtained at the lower Mach numbers) was from -2 degrees to 25 degrees. The sideslip-angle range investigated was from -4 degrees to 12 degrees. The investigation included effects of various arrangements of wing fences, leading-edge chord-extensions, and leading-edge notches. Various fuselage fences, spoilers, and a dive brake also were investigated. From overall considerations of lift, drag, and pitching moments, it appears that there were two modifications somewhat superior to any of the others investigated: One was a configuration that employed a full-chord fence and a partial-chord fence located at 0.63 semispan and 0.55 semispan, respectively. The second was a leading-edge chord-extension that extended from 0.68 semispan to 0.85 semispan in combination with a leading-edge notch located at 0.68 semispan. With plus or minus 10 degrees aileron, the estimated wing-tip helix angle was reduced from 0.125 at a Mach number of 0.50 to 0.088 at a Mach number of 0.92, with corresponding rates of roll of 4.0 and 5.2 radians per second. The upper aft fuselage dive brake, when deflected 30 degrees and 60 degrees, reduced the rudder effectiveness about 10 to 20 percent and about 35 to 50 percent, respectively.
Date: August 10, 1954
Creator: Spreeman, Kenneth P. & Few, Albert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7-by 10-Foot Tunnel: TED No. DE308, Part 6, Estimated High-Speed Flying Qualities

Description: An analysis of the estimated high-speed flying qualities of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 has been made, based on tests of an 0.08-scale model of this airplane in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel. The analysis indicates longitudinal control-position instability at transonic speeds, but the accompanying trim changes are not large. Control-position maneuvering stability, however, is present for all speeds. Longitudinal lateral control appear adequate, but the damping of the short-period longitudinal and lateral oscillations at high altitudes is poor and may require artificial damping.
Date: October 28, 1948
Creator: Donlan, Charles J. & Kuhn, Richard E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01, TED No. NACA DE 390

Description: Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 to determine the static longitudinal stability and control characteristics of various arrangements of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane. Tests were made of the complete model and various combinations of its component parts and, in addition, the effects of various body modifications, a revised vertical tail, and wing fences on the longitudinal characteristics were determined. The results indicate that for a horizontal-tail incidence of -10 deg the trim lift coefficient varied from 0.29 at a Mach number of 1.61 to 0.23 at a Mach number of 2.01 with a corresponding decrease in lift-drag trim from 3.72 to 3.15. Stick-position instability was indicated in the low-supersonic-speed range. A photographic-type nose modification resulted in slightly higher values of minimum drag coefficient but did not significantly affect the static stability or lift-curve slope. The minimum drag coefficient for the complete model with the production nose remained essentially constant at 0.047 throughout the Mach number range investigated.
Date: May 23, 1956
Creator: Driver, Cornelius
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability and Control Data Obtained from Tests of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Goodyear XZP5K Airship, TED No. NACA DE 211

Description: Static longitudinal and lateral stability and control data are presented of an investigation on a l/15-scale model of the Goodyear XZP5K airship over a pitch and yaw range of +/-20 deg and 0 deg to 30 deg, respectively, for various rudder and elevator deflections. Two tail configurations of different plan forms were tested and wake and boundary-layer surveys were conducted. Testing was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 16.5 x 10(exp 6) based on hull length, and corresponds to a Mach number of about 0.12.
Date: January 11, 1956
Creator: Cannon, Michael D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Yawed-Landing Investigation of a Model of the Convair Y2-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 363

Description: A model of the Convair Y2-2 airplane was tested in Langley tank no. 2 to determine whether satisfactory stability in yawed landings was possible with a certain ventral fin. Free-body landings were made in smooth and rough water at two speeds and two rates of descent with the model yawed 15deg. The behavior of the model was determined by visual observations and from motion-picture re.cords. It was concluded that satisfactory stability was possible with the ventral fin as tested but that the characteristics of the model shock absorbers and the settings of the elevon control surfaces had an appreciable influence on behavior.
Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Hoffman, Edward L. & Fisher, Lloyd J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 1/8-Scale Powered Model of the XTB3F-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2382

Description: A 1/8 scale model of the Grumman XTB3F-1 airplane was tested in the Langley 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the stability and control characteristics and to provide data for estimating the airplane handling qualities. The report includes longitudinal and lateral stability and control characteristics of the complete model, the characteristics of the isolated horizontal tail, the effects of various flow conditions through the jet duct, tests with external stores attached to the underside of the wing, ana tests simulating landing and take-off conditions with a ground board. The handling characteristics of the airplane have not been computed but some conclusions were indicated by the data. An improvement in the longitudinal stability was obtained by tilting the thrust line down. It is shown that if the wing flap is spring loaded so that the flap deflection varies with airspeed, the airplanes will be less stable than with the flap retracted or fully deflected. An increase in size of the vertical tail and of the dorsal fin gave more desirable yawing-moment characteristics than the original vertical tail and dorsal fin. Preventing air flow through the jet duct system or simulating jet operation with unheated air produced only small changes in the model characteristics. The external stores on the underside of the wing had only small effects on the model characteristics. After completion of the investigation, the model was returned to the contractor for modifications indicated by the test results.
Date: August 1, 1947
Creator: McKee, John W. & Vogler, Raymond D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Tests of the 1/25-Scale Powered Model of the Martin JRM-1 Airplane. IV - Tests with Ground Board and with Modified Wing and Hull - TED No. NACA 232, Part 4, Tests with Ground Board and with Modified Wing and Hull, TED No. NACA 232

Description: Wind-tunnel tests were made of a 1/25 scale model of the Martin JRM-1 airplane to determine: (1) The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the JRM-1 model near the water and lateral and directional stability characteristics with power while moving on the surface of the water, the latter being useful for the design of tip floats; (2) The stability and stalling characteristics of the wing with a modified airfoil contour; (3) Stability characteristics of a hull of larger design gross weight; The test results indicated that the elevator was powerful enough to trim the original model in a landing configuration at any lift coefficient within the specified range of centers of gravity. The ground-board tests for evaluating the aerodynamic forces and moments on an airplane in a simulated cross wind indicate a high dihedral effect in the presence of the ground board and, consequently, during low-speed taxying and take-off, large overturning moments would result which would have to be overcome by the tip floats.
Date: September 4, 1947
Creator: Lockwood, Vernard E. & Smith, Bernard J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight-Determination of the Low-Lift Drag and Longitudinal Stability of a 1/10-Scale Rocket-Powered Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers from 0.7

Description: A flight investigation has been made to determine the drag and longitudinal stability of a 1/10- scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane from Mach numbers 0.7 to 1.4 at lift coefficients near zero. The drag rise occurred near M = 0.95. The external drag coefficient was a constant value of about 0.012 at subsonic speeds up to the point of drag rise where it increased abruptly to a value of 0.030 at M = 1.0 followed by a more gradual increase to a value of 0.038 at M = 1.25. The model indicated that, at 35,000 feet and a level-flight free-stream Mach number of 1.0, the drag of the full-scale airplane would exceed the thrust available from an XJ40-WE-8 engine with after-burning. The transonic trim change was small. The aerodynamic center moved gradually from the most forward location of 21.0-percent mean aerodynamic chord at M = 0.9 to the most rearward location of 40-percent mean aerodynamic chord at M = 1.25. The damping in pitch was low.
Date: January 1, 1951
Creator: Mitcham, Grady L.; Blanchard, Willard S., Jr. & Hastings, Earl C., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane During Constant-Altitude Transitions, TED No. NACA DE 368

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale flying model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. This paper presents the results of flight tests to determine the stability and control characteristics of the model during constant-altitude slow transitions from hovering to normal unstalled forward flight. The tests indicated that the airplane can be flown through the transition range fairly easily although some difficulty will probably encountered in controlling the yawing motions at angles of attack between about 60 and 40. An increase in the size of the vertical tail will not materially improve the controllability of the yawing motions in this range of angle of attack but the use of a yaw damper will make the yawing motions easy to control throughout the entire transitional flight range. The tests also indicated that the airplane can probably be flown sideways satisfactorily at speeds up to approximately 33 knots (full scale) with the normal control system and up to approximately 37 knots (full scale) with both elevons and rudders rigged to move differentially for roll control. At sideways speeds above these values, the airplane will have a strong tendency to diverge uncontrollably in roll.
Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Lovell, Powell M., Jr.; Kibry, Robert H. & Smith, Charles C., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department