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Perceptions of Student Activities Mid-Managers toward their Career Goals and Career Opportunities

Description: The problem of this study was career goals of student activities mid-managers and their perceptions of attaining these career goals. An introduction and the purposes of the study are included in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 includes a review of selected literature on professional development and mobility. The methodology used to conduct this study is described in Chapter 3. The findings are presented in Chapter 4, and the summary, discussion, conclusions, and recommendations are contained in Chapter 5. The 455 student activities mid-managers employed at institutions holding membership in the National Association for Campus Activities were mailed a questionnaire composed of demographic items and questions seeking information relevant to the purposes of this study. A total of 296 (65%) usable surveys were returned. The results of the study indicate that the positions of chief student affairs officer and dean of students were career goals of the subjects. The dean of students position was the only position that was perceived as attainable by the subjects. When looked at by gender, males desired and believed that the positions of chief student affairs officer and dean of students were reachable. Women desired both positions, but believed that only the position of dean of students was attainable. A t-test revealed a significant difference between the desire of males and females regarding the position of chief student affairs officer. Fourteen items were presented to the subjects to assess their perceptions of institutional support for professional growth. The sample identified 8 of the 14 items as present in their organizations. A t-test revealed no significant difference between the perceptions of males and females regarding institutional support on any of the 14 items.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Connell, Matthew Joseph
Partner: UNT Libraries

Importance and Responsibility of Student Development Goals Among Chief Academic and Chief Student Affairs Officers

Description: The purpose of the study was to determine if there were significant differences in the perceived importance and responsibility of student development goals between chief academic officers (CAOs) and chief student affairs officers (CSAOs). The population for this study consisted of CAOs and CSAOs at liberal arts institutions located in 15 southern states.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Chandler, Kristie B. (Kristie Byrne)
Partner: UNT Libraries

An investigation of the effective supervision and communication competence of chief student affairs officers in Christian institutions of higher education.

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine if there is an association between effective supervision and communication competence in divisions of student affairs at Christian higher education institutions. The investigation examined chief student affairs officers (CSAOs) and their direct reports at 45 institutions across the United States using the Synergistic Supervision Scale and the Communication Competence Questionnaire. A positive significant association was found between the direct report's evaluation of the CSAO's level of synergistic supervision and the direct report's evaluation of the CSAO's level of communication competence. The findings of this study will advance the supervision and communication competence literature while informing practice for student affairs professionals. This study provides a foundation of research in the context specific field of student affairs where there has been a dearth of literature regarding effective supervision. This study can be used as a platform for future research to further the understanding of characteristics that define effective supervision.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Wilcoxson, Douglas A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Burnout Among Student Affairs Professionals at Metropolitan Universities

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of burnout among student affairs professionals at the 52 U.S. member institutions of the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities. Packets containing the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Moos Work Environment Scale (WES), and a demographic survey were mailed to 371 senior student affairs administrators at the member institutions, with a completed response rate of 58.22%. The senior student affairs administrators surveyed included the chief student affairs officers and the professional staff who reported to them. The research design employed t-tests, analyses of variance, and Pearson's Product Moment correlations. The scores obtained from the MBI and WES subscales were compared overall and along 9 independent variablestitle of position, size of institution, appointment, salary, years in current position, years in profession, age, gender, and highest degree attained. Average levels of burnout were found on each of the MBI subscores. Contrary to earlier studies, women did not suffer from statistically significant higher levels of burnout than men, and burnout levels decreased with age and years in the profession for both sexes. Lower scores on the MBI depersonalization subscale were found in employees in mid-career and in professionals from smaller schools. Emotional exhaustion was not a factor. Environmental factors relating to burnout and job satisfaction were also explored. Statistically significant differences on the WES were found on all of the independent variables except the years in the current position variable. The metropolitan environment may have been effective in reducing the amount of burnout felt by this group of student affairs professionals. The study underscored the need for continuing research in burnout for student affairs professionals and for continued professional development throughout the career span.
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Date: August 2001
Creator: Murphy, Lynda
Partner: UNT Libraries