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[Snowball Fight in front of Administration Building]

Description: Photograph of four men throwing snowballs over a snow-covered car during winter on the North Texas State University Campus. A line of parked cars lead up to the The Hurley Administration building in the background. Farthest to the left of the frame, a man looks on. Snow covers the surrounding ground and trees.
Date: 1963
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Script: Lavon Dam]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about the dedication of the Lavon Dam in Collin County.
Date: October 28, 1953
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Bruce Monroe and Another Man in Front of a Banner at a Memorial Service for Terry Tebedo]

Description: Photograph of two men, both in jeans and tennis shoes, standing in a dark outdoor area in front of a banner that reads "Never Forget : Dallas Gay Alliance" (partially obscured by the man on the left). The man on the left is Bruce Monroe. Large floral arrangements and wreaths sit under the banner. Photograph taken at the memorial service honoring Terry Tebedo, who died of AIDS complications in 1988. Members of the Dallas Gay Alliance are present, as well as members of Gay Urban Truth Squad (GUTS), a sub-organization of the Alliance.
Date: 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Smith family]

Description: Photograph of the Smith family gathered in a room in their home. Many of the family members have musical instruments. Ruby Smith is in the center of the photograph with a guitar. Cora Smith is seated on the right, also with a guitar. From Junebug Clark: Family gatherings with singing and playing guitars was a form of family fun, gatherings, evening entertainment for all ages in the hills of Tennessee. Joe spent many a evening with his family as a boy gathering with friends and family. It was a time that everyone lived close to and took care of each other.
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Walk home]

Description: Photograph of a young man and young woman walking along a rocky path illuminated by a gas lamp at night. The envelope containing the negative is annotated "stir-off".
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Kissing Couple]

Description: Photograph of Romana Weaver kissing an unidentified boy after the molasses stir-off. In this image, the two are standing on a rocky path in the forest, and the boy is holding a lantern.
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Arriving at the Stir-off]

Description: Narrative by Junebug Clark in the summer of 2014 Friends and neighbors come from miles around to participate in the Molasses Making Stir-off. Overall Background: These Molasses Making Stir-off photos were shot by Joe Clark HBSS in the early to mid-1940s. Either on the farm of Fred Whitaker about four miles southwest of Cumberland Gap, or in Cumberland Gap on the farm of Baptist preacher the Rev. Hugh Vancel. More information about these images can be found in scrapbooks in the Clark Family Collection at the University of North Texas Special Collections Library. Specifically in a Detroit news pictorial article published December 13, 1942 titles "stir-off party" where mountaineers make molasses and merriment. Also in life magazine published November 13, 1950 [page 156] titled “Stir-off Time in Tennessee, Fun Starts in Hills as Molasses Boils.’ Also in the library is the NBC Today Show story on Joe Clark HBSS by Bob Dotson. It features Joe Clark returning to Cumberland Gap Tennessee to photograph a molasses stir off taking place in the same location as some of these photographs and attended by some of the same people in the early 1980s. Let me briefly set the scene of the time and era that these photos were made. World War II was raging. Television did not exist. Radio reception sporadic in this mountain country. School was held only three months a year mostly during the winter months. Most news of the changes in the outside world was learned, they say, “By looking at pictures in the Sears catalogs.” They farmed steep and rolling hillsides of very poor land. In most of America, to help in the war effort, the rationing of food and other essentials was prevalent. Very few of these Tennessee mountaineers and hill folk had homes with electricity. None with ...
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections