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Flight Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane During Constant-Altitude Transitions, TED No. NACA DE 368

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale flying model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. This paper presents the results of flight tests to determine the stability and control characteristics of the model during constant-altitude slow transitions from hovering to normal unstalled forward flight. The tests indicated that the airplane can be flown through the transition range fairly easily although some difficulty will probably encountered in controlling the yawing motions at angles of attack between about 60 and 40. An increase in the size of the vertical tail will not materially improve the controllability of the yawing motions in this range of angle of attack but the use of a yaw damper will make the yawing motions easy to control throughout the entire transitional flight range. The tests also indicated that the airplane can probably be flown sideways satisfactorily at speeds up to approximately 33 knots (full scale) with the normal control system and up to approximately 37 knots (full scale) with both elevons and rudders rigged to move differentially for roll control. At sideways speeds above these values, the airplane will have a strong tendency to diverge uncontrollably in roll.
Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Lovell, Powell M., Jr.; Kibry, Robert H. & Smith, Charles C., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Take-Off and Landing Characteristics of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in Steady Winds, TED No. NACA DE 368

Description: An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale free-flight model of the Convair XFY-1 airplane during take-offs and landings in steady winds. The tests indicated that take-offs in headwinds up to at least 20 knots (full scale) will be fairly easy to perform although the airplane may be blown downstream as much as 3 spans before a trim condition can be established. The distance that the airplane will be blown down-stream can be reduced by restraining the upwind landing gear until the instant of take-off. The tests also indicated that spot landings in headwinds up to at least 30 knots (full scale) and in crosswinds up to at least 20 knots (full scale) can be accomplished with reasonable accuracy although, during the landing approach, there will probably be an undesirable nosing-up tendency caused by ground effect and by the change in angle of attack resulting from vertical descent. Some form of arresting gear will probably be required to prevent the airplane from rolling downwind or tipping over after contact. This rolling and tipping can be prevented by a snubbing line attached to the tip of the upwind' wing or tail or by an arresting gear consisting of a wire mesh on the ground and hooks on the landing gear to engage the mesh.
Date: June 22, 1954
Creator: Schade, Robert O.; Smith, Charles C., Jr. & Lovell, P. M., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department