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Andean-U.S. Free-Trade Agreement Negotiations

Description: In November 2003, the Bush Administration announced that it intended to begin negotiations on a free-trade agreement (FTA) with these nations, which would reduce and eliminate foreign barriers to trade and investment, support democracy, and fight drug activity. This report briefly discusses this announcement, as well as the major issues and concerns relating to negotiation, and the Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA), the FTA's predecessor.
Date: June 16, 2005
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Andean-U.S. Free-Trade Agreement Negotiations

Description: In November 2003, the Bush Administration announced that it intended to begin negotiations on a free-trade agreement (FTA) with these nations, which would reduce and eliminate foreign barriers to trade and investment, support democracy, and fight drug activity. This report briefly discusses this announcement, as well as the major issues and concerns relating to negotiation, and the Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA), the FTA's predecessor.
Date: June 29, 2005
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The OECD Shipbuilding Agreement and Legislation in the 105th Congress

Description: This report discusses the agreement on shipbuilding signed by the United States, the European Union, Japan, Korea, and Norway and was negotiated under the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).
Date: August 14, 1998
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues

Description: The World Trade Organization (WTO) was established on January 1, 1995, under an agreement reached during the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations. The Uruguay Round was the last of a series of periodic trade negotiations held under the auspices of the WTO’s predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Among the questions asked during debate on U.S. trade policy and the WTO are: To what extent should the United States meet its trade goals in theWTO versus other options? Can the United States maintain its sovereignty as a member of the WTO? Are U.S. interests served through the WTO dispute process? Should the WTO continue to cover traditional trade issues only, or should it be broadened to include nontraditional issues such as labor and the environment? What is the role of Congress in U.S. participation in the WTO?
Date: January 12, 2001
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues

Description: The World Trade Organization (WTO), which was established on January 1, 1995, is the principal organization for rules governing international trade. This report provides general background on the WTO: its establishment, principles, administrative bodies, and membership. It also includes a brief discussion of policy issues pertaining to the WTO agenda, U.S. sovereignty and membership in the WTO, the congressional role in U.S. participation in the WTO, and pursuit of U.S. trade goals in the WTO compared to other options.
Date: June 4, 2001
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues

Description: The World Trade Organization (WTO) was established on January 1, 1995, under an agreement reached during the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations. The Uruguay Round was the last of a series of periodic trade negotiations held under the auspices of the WTO’s predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Among the questions asked during debate on U.S. trade policy and the WTO are: To what extent should the United States meet its trade goals in theWTO versus other options? Can the United States maintain its sovereignty as a member of the WTO? Are U.S. interests served through the WTO dispute process? Should the WTO continue to cover traditional trade issues only, or should it be broadened to include nontraditional issues such as labor and the environment? What is the role of Congress in U.S. participation in the WTO?
Date: March 5, 2003
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

World Trade Organization Negotiations: The Doha Development Agenda

Description: On November 9-14, 2001, trade ministers from WTO countries met in Doha, Qatar for their fourth Ministerial Conference. At that meeting, they agreed to a work program for a new round of multilateral trade negotiations to conclude by January 1, 2005. The work program folds on-going negotiations on agriculture and services into a broader agenda that includes industrial tariffs, topics of interest to developing countries, changes in WTO rules, and other provisions. Because of the influence that developing countries had in setting the work program, the round has become known as the Doha Development Agenda. Agriculture has been the linchpin in the Doha Development Agenda. U.S. goals were substantial reduction of trade-distorting domestic support; elimination of export subsidies, and improved market access. Industrial trade barriers and services are other market access topics in the negotiations.
Date: August 6, 2004
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The World Trade Organization (WTO) Seattle Ministerial Conference

Description: On November 30th to December 3rd, 1999, the highest decision-making body of the World Trade Organization (WTO), called the Ministerial Conference, will meet in Seattle to make broad policy decisions. The key issue for the trade ministers attending the meeting will be to decide on the structure and topics for the agenda of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations. Countries have committed to discuss agriculture and services trade in the new round. Other items that have been proposed for inclusion in the new round or for earlier consideration include tariff reductions, concessions for developing countries, labor issues and the environment, and the WTO decision-making process. Major labor, environmental, and consumer interest groups are expected to be present in Seattle to argue for more consideration of workers' rights and the environment within the WTO. This report provides a summary background on preparations for the Ministerial and related issues of congressional interest.
Date: November 19, 1999
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department