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A Beginner’s Guide to Persistent Identifiers

Description: The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship.
Date: February 2014
Creator: Schaffner, Jennifer & Erway, Ricky
Partner: UNT Libraries

Does Every Research Library Need a Digital Humanities Center?

Description: The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship.
Date: February 2014
Creator: Schaffner, Jennifer & Erway, Ricky
Partner: UNT Libraries

Searching for Sustainability: Strategies from Eight Digitized Special Collections

Description: This report aims to address one of the biggest challenges facing libraries and cultural heritage organizations: how to move their special collections into the 21st century through digitization while developing successful strategies to make sure those collections remain accessible and relevant over time. Through a cooperative agreement as part of the National Leadership Grants Program, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funded the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), in partnership with Ithaka S+R, to undertake in-depth case studies of institutions that have worked to build the audience, infrastructure, and funding models necessary to maintain and grow their digital collections. The eight collections profiled provide useful models and examples of good practice for project leaders to consider when digitizing their own materials. We hope that these case studies will encourage greater discussion among individuals in the academic library and cultural heritage communities about the reasons why they invest so much time and energy in the creation and ongoing management of their digitized special collections, the goals they set for them, and the planning needed to realize those aims. These questions become even more pressing in an environment where the traditional sources of funding for digitization are beginning to wane. In the coming years, the ability to identify secure sources of support and to demonstrate impact over time will undoubtedly become increasingly important.
Date: November 2013
Creator: Maron, Nancy & Pickle, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries

Appraising our digital investment : sustainability of digitized special collections in ARL libraries

Description: Sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and conducted by Ithaka S+R, this study provides insight into how ARL libraries are managing and funding the hundreds of digitized special collections they have created and that they believe to be critical to their futures. This is the first survey of ARL institutions that specifically attempts to understand and benchmark the activities and costs of supporting these collections after they are created. By looking at questions of management, costs, funding sources, impact, and outreach, the survey offers data that will deliver insight to all those engaged in sustaining digitized special collections.
Date: February 2013
Creator: Maron, Nancy & Pickle, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries

National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014

Description: During the summer of 2014, the Division of Preservation and Access sought to evaluate the impact of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) since its beginnings in 2004. Information about the program was obtained through interviews of project directors, performance reports from the awardees, and a survey of NDNP participants developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress. Reports from the state partners on their projects were analyzed and examined the ways in which Chronicling America resources are being used. This document summarizes the results of the investigations and demonstrates the impact of NDNP through a constellation of examples. Among other things, the impact study identifies several projects that are taking advantage of this massive, centralized resource as scholars experiment with data mining tools for humanities research. The report concludes in summarizing many project directors' view in saying that the benefits of the National Digital Newspaper Program far surpassed anything anyone could have imagined when the program was launched a decade ago. In sum, NDNP stands as a fine example of what a federal agencies working collaboratively with state partners can achieve.
Date: September 2014
Creator: Mears, Jamie
Partner: UNT Libraries