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Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

Description: This report provides an overview of Congressional support for the economic and societal benefits of nanotechnology; discusses three areas of focus - federal research and development (R&D) in nanotechnology, U.S. competitiveness, and environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns; and also discusses nanomanufacturing and public understanding of and attitudes toward nanotechnology.
Date: May 20, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and U.S. Competitiveness: Issues and Options

Description: This report provides an overview of nanotechnology, current and anticipated applications, indicators of U.S. scientific and technological strength, and issues and options Congress may opt to consider for the federal role, if any, in promoting the nation's competitive position in nanotechnology.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and Environmental, Health, and Safety: Issues for Consideration

Description: This report identifies the potential environmental, health, and safety opportunities and challenges of nanotechnology; explains the importance of addressing nanotechnology environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns; identifies and discusses nanotechnology EHS issues; and summarizes options for Congressional action, including the nanotechnology EHS-related provisions of selected legislation. The report also includes two appendices.
Date: August 6, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

Description: This report provides an overview of the nanotechnology that is believed by many to offer extraordinary economic and societal benefits and two others: nanomanufacturing and public understanding of and attitudes toward nanotechnology.
Date: March 12, 2010
Creator: Sargent, John F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology: Small Matters

Description: The primary objective of this project was to engage members of the public in an active and balanced deliberative discussion about the social, ethical, legal, environmental, and policy issues arising from nanotechnologies. A second but equally important objective was to interest members of the public in learning more about science and technology and nanotechnology specifically by understanding how it will affect their lives. The objectives were met through a series of electronic and face-to-face citizen forums conducted in conjunction with three Fred Friendly Seminars being taped on the University of California, Berkeley campus in partnership with Lawrence Hall of Science (this forum was conducted in partnership with the St. Louis Science Center); the Boston Museum of Science in Boston, MA; and the State Museum of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina. The topical area for each forum paralleled the content of the Fred Friendly Seminars series being taped at each location, but specific topics/issues were drawn from the concerns and interests of the communities. The three topical areas included Environmental Impact (St. Louis), Privacy vs. Security (Boston), and Health and Enhancement (Columbia). The PI and project leader worked with the local science centers to identify stakeholder groups, such as academic, corporate and government scientists; environmental advocates; business leaders; science and technology journalists; and public policy makers within each community. Representatives from each group along with members of the general public were invited to participate in a series of on line and in person deliberations that were designed to provide basic information about the science, its potential benefits and risks, and avenues for public participation in policy formulation. On line resources were designed and managed by ScienceVIEW at Lawrence Hall of Science and Earth & Sky, Inc. The activities at each site were evaluated by Inverness Research Associates to assess whether ...
Date: June 30, 2008
Creator: Needham, Cynthia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Efficiency Solar Power via Separated Photo and Voltaic Pathways

Description: This project demonstrates a novel nanostructured solar cell architecture capable of achieving high efficiency levels that is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The high efficiency will be achieved by the novel structure that separates the path of the photons from the path of the generated charge carriers. In this way, the photon path can be long for maximum light absorption, while the path for carriers can be short for maximum electronic energy harvesting. The combination of maximum light absorption coupled with maximum carrier harvesting is the basis for the expected high efficiency. The project will develop high efficiency solar cell prototypes utilizing this unique nanostructured architecture. The project addresses the fundamental limitation inherent in all current solar cell designs, and which opens a pathway to development for high efficiency solar cells at low cost. Realizing this goal will result in a levelized cost of electricity in the range of 10¢/kWh, which would achieve the long-sought goal of making photovoltaic electricity cost competitive with fossil-fuel generated electricity without any governmental subsidies. This breakthrough would spur the already rapid growth in the photovoltaic industry to an explosive pace, with significant, widespread benefit to the national economy and the nation’s energy security. The initial target of the program is to develop single-junction solar cells using ultrathin amorphous silicon with the performance approaching that of single crystal silicon cells.
Date: February 17, 2009
Creator: Naughton, Michael J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Center for Intelligent Fuel Cell Materials Design

Description: The goal of this work was to develop a composite proton exchange membrane utilizing 1) readily available, low cost materials 2) readily modified and 3) easily processed to meet the chemical, mechanical and electrical requirements of high temperature PEM fuel cells. One of the primary goals was to produce a conducting polymer that met the criteria for strength, binding capability for additives, chemical stability, dimensional stability and good conductivity. In addition compatible, specialty nanoparticles were synthesized to provide water management and enhanced conductivity. The combination of these components in a multilayered, composite PEM has demonstrated improved conductivity at high temperatures and low humidity over commercially available polymers. The research reported in this final document has greatly increased the knowledge base related to post sulfonation of chemically and mechanically stable engineered polymers (Radel). Both electrical and strength factors for the degree of post sulfonation far exceed previous data, indicating the potential use of these materials in suitable proton exchange membrane architectures for the development of fuel cells. In addition compatible, hydrophilic, conductive nano-structures have been synthesized and incorporated into unique proton exchange membrane architectures. The use of post sulfonation for the engineered polymer and nano-particle provide cost effective techniques to produce the required components of a proton exchange membrane. The development of a multilayer proton exchange membrane as described in our work has produced a highly stable membrane at 170°C with conductivities exceeding commercially available proton exchange membranes at high temperatures and low humidity. The components and architecture of the proton exchange membrane discussed will provide low cost components for the portable market and potentially the transportation market. The development of unique components and membrane architecture provides a key element for the United States: 1) to transition the country from a fossil fuel based energy economy to a renewable energy based ...
Date: August 26, 2008
Creator: Santurri, P.R., (Chemsultants International); Hartmann-Thompson, C. & Keinath, S.E. (Michigan Molecular Inst.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and U.S. Competitiveness: Issues and Options

Description: This report reviews national nanotechnology research and development (R&D) investments, scientific papers, and patents as indicators of current U.S. scientific and technological competitiveness and potential indicators of future industrial competitiveness in nanotechnology products.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photovoltaics R&D: At the Tipping Point

Description: '' . . . with robust investments in research and market development, the picture changes dramatically.'' Thus, the realigned U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Roadmap highlights R&D as critical to the tipping point that will make solar photovoltaics (PV) significant in the U.S. energy portfolio--part of a well-designed plan that would bring ''2034 expectations'' to reality by 2020. Technology improvement and introduction depend on key, focused, and pertinent research contributions that range from the most fundamental through the applied. In this paper, we underscore the successes and relevance of our current systems-driven PV R&D programs, which are built on integrated capabilities. These capabilities span atomic-level characterization, nanotechnology, new materials design, interface and device engineering, theoretical guidance and modeling, processing, measurements and analysis, and process integration. This presentation identifies and provides examples of critical research tipping points needed to foster now and near technologies (primarily crystalline silicon and thin films) and to introduce coming generations of solar PV that provide options to push us to the next performance levels (devices with ultra-high efficiencies and with ultra-low cost). The serious importance of science and creativity to U.S. PV technology ownership--and the increased focus to accelerate the time from laboratory discovery to industry adoption--are emphasized at this ''tipping point'' for solar PV.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Kazmerski, L. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manipulating Molecules: Federal Support for Nanotechnology Research

Description: The Bush Administration has requested $1.277 billion for nanotechnology research for FY2007. Nanotechnology is a newly emerging field of science where scientists and engineers are beginning to manipulate matter at the molecular and atomic levels in order to obtain materials and systems with significantly improved properties. Scientists note that nanotechnology is still in its infancy, with large scale practical applications 10 to 30 year away. Congressional concerns include funding for the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), the potential environmental and health concerns associated with the development and deployment of nanotechnology, and the need to adopt international measurement standards for nanotechnology.
Date: March 29, 2006
Creator: Davey, Michael E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asset Distribution of Taxable Estates: An Analysis

Description: This report provides data on the distribution of assets in taxable estates that filed returns in 1998. The report also offers a brief overview of the estate and gift tax and "The Death Tax Elimination Act of 2000," which was passed in the 106th Congress and vetoed. This report finds that farm and business assets represent a small share of the total value of taxable estate tax returns filed in 1998. For an overview of estate tax, see CRS Report RL30600, Estate and Gift Taxes: Economic Issues, by Jane G. Gravelle and Steven Maguire. This report will be updated as new data becomes available.
Date: December 7, 2000
Creator: Maguire, Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department