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Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

Description: This report provides an overview of Congressional support for the economic and societal benefits of nanotechnology; discusses three areas of focus - federal research and development (R&D) in nanotechnology, U.S. competitiveness, and environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns; and also discusses nanomanufacturing and public understanding of and attitudes toward nanotechnology.
Date: May 20, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and U.S. Competitiveness: Issues and Options

Description: This report provides an overview of nanotechnology, current and anticipated applications, indicators of U.S. scientific and technological strength, and issues and options Congress may opt to consider for the federal role, if any, in promoting the nation's competitive position in nanotechnology.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and Environmental, Health, and Safety: Issues for Consideration

Description: This report identifies the potential environmental, health, and safety opportunities and challenges of nanotechnology; explains the importance of addressing nanotechnology environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns; identifies and discusses nanotechnology EHS issues; and summarizes options for Congressional action, including the nanotechnology EHS-related provisions of selected legislation. The report also includes two appendices.
Date: August 6, 2008
Creator: Sargent, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

Description: This report provides an overview of the nanotechnology that is believed by many to offer extraordinary economic and societal benefits and two others: nanomanufacturing and public understanding of and attitudes toward nanotechnology.
Date: March 12, 2010
Creator: Sargent, John F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

Description: This report provides an overview of the nanotechnology that is believed by many to offer extraordinary economic and societal benefits, which are discussed in more detail in other CRS reports—and two others: nanomanufacturing and public understanding of and attitudes toward nanotechnology.
Date: February 7, 2009
Creator: Sargent, John F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and Environmental, Health, and Safety: Issues for Consideration

Description: This report identifies the potential environmental, health, and safety opportunities and challenges of nanotechnology; explains the importance of addressing nanotechnology EHS concerns; identifies and discusses nanotechnology EHS issues; and summarizes options for Congressional action, including the nanotechnology EHS-related provisions of selected legislation. The report also includes two appendices.
Date: February 9, 2009
Creator: Sargent, John F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology and Environmental, Health, and Safety: Issues for Consideration

Description: This report: identifies the potential environmental, health, and safety opportunities and challenges of nanotechnology; explains the importance of addressing nanotechnology EHS concerns; identifies and discusses nanotechnology EHS issues; and summarizes options for Congressional action, including the nanotechnology EHS-related provisions of selected legislation.
Date: January 20, 2011
Creator: Sargent, John F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

Description: DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.
Date: March 28, 2013
Creator: Broadbridge, Christine C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanotechnology: Small Matters

Description: The primary objective of this project was to engage members of the public in an active and balanced deliberative discussion about the social, ethical, legal, environmental, and policy issues arising from nanotechnologies. A second but equally important objective was to interest members of the public in learning more about science and technology and nanotechnology specifically by understanding how it will affect their lives. The objectives were met through a series of electronic and face-to-face citizen forums conducted in conjunction with three Fred Friendly Seminars being taped on the University of California, Berkeley campus in partnership with Lawrence Hall of Science (this forum was conducted in partnership with the St. Louis Science Center); the Boston Museum of Science in Boston, MA; and the State Museum of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina. The topical area for each forum paralleled the content of the Fred Friendly Seminars series being taped at each location, but specific topics/issues were drawn from the concerns and interests of the communities. The three topical areas included Environmental Impact (St. Louis), Privacy vs. Security (Boston), and Health and Enhancement (Columbia). The PI and project leader worked with the local science centers to identify stakeholder groups, such as academic, corporate and government scientists; environmental advocates; business leaders; science and technology journalists; and public policy makers within each community. Representatives from each group along with members of the general public were invited to participate in a series of on line and in person deliberations that were designed to provide basic information about the science, its potential benefits and risks, and avenues for public participation in policy formulation. On line resources were designed and managed by ScienceVIEW at Lawrence Hall of Science and Earth & Sky, Inc. The activities at each site were evaluated by Inverness Research Associates to assess whether ...
Date: June 30, 2008
Creator: Needham, Cynthia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Efficiency Solar Power via Separated Photo and Voltaic Pathways

Description: This project demonstrates a novel nanostructured solar cell architecture capable of achieving high efficiency levels that is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The high efficiency will be achieved by the novel structure that separates the path of the photons from the path of the generated charge carriers. In this way, the photon path can be long for maximum light absorption, while the path for carriers can be short for maximum electronic energy harvesting. The combination of maximum light absorption coupled with maximum carrier harvesting is the basis for the expected high efficiency. The project will develop high efficiency solar cell prototypes utilizing this unique nanostructured architecture. The project addresses the fundamental limitation inherent in all current solar cell designs, and which opens a pathway to development for high efficiency solar cells at low cost. Realizing this goal will result in a levelized cost of electricity in the range of 10¢/kWh, which would achieve the long-sought goal of making photovoltaic electricity cost competitive with fossil-fuel generated electricity without any governmental subsidies. This breakthrough would spur the already rapid growth in the photovoltaic industry to an explosive pace, with significant, widespread benefit to the national economy and the nation’s energy security. The initial target of the program is to develop single-junction solar cells using ultrathin amorphous silicon with the performance approaching that of single crystal silicon cells.
Date: February 17, 2009
Creator: Naughton, Michael J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department