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nip, a Symbiotic Medicago truncatula Mutant that Forms Root Nodules with Aberrant Infection Threads and Plant Defense-Like Response

Description: Article on nip, a symbiotic Medicago truncatula mutant that forms root nodules with aberrant infection threads and plant defense-like response.
Date: November 2004
Creator: Veereshlingam, Harita; Haynes, Janine G.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Sherrier, D. Janine & Dickstein, Rebecca
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Map-based cloning of the NIP gene in model legume Medicago truncatula.

Description: Large amounts of industrial fertilizers are used to maximize crop yields. Unfortunately, they are not completely consumed by plants; consequently, this leads to soil pollution and negative effects on aquatic systems. An alternative to industrial fertilizers can be found in legume plants that provide a nitrogen source that is not harmful for the environment. Legume plants, through their symbiosis with soil bacteria called rhizobia, are able to reduce atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, a biological nitrogen source. Establishment of the symbiosis requires communication on the molecular level between the two symbionts, which leads to changes on the cellular level and ultimately results in nitrogen-fixing nodule development. Inside the nodules hypoxic environment, the bacterial enzyme nitrogenase reduces atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Medicago truncatula is the model legume plant that is used to study symbiosis with mycorrhiza and with the bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti. The focus of this work is the M. truncatula nodulation mutant nip (numerous infections and polyphenolics). The NIP gene plays a role in the formation and differentiation of nodules, and development of lateral roots. Studying this mutant will contribute knowledge to understanding the plant response to infection and how the invasion by rhizobia is regulated. Previous genetic mapping placed NIP at the top of linkage group 1 of the M. truncatula genome. A NIP mapping population was established with the purpose of performing fine mapping in the region containing NIP. DNA from two M. truncatula ecotypes A17 and A20 can be distinguished through polymorphisms. Positional mapping of the NIP gene is based on the A17/A20 genetic map of M. truncatula. The NIP mapping population of 2277 plants was scored for their nodulation phenotype and genotyped with flanking molecular genetic markers 146o17 and 23c16d, which are located ~1.5 cM apart and on either side of NIP. This resulted in the identification ...
Date: May 2007
Creator: Morris, Viktoriya
Partner: UNT Libraries

Physical Map between Marker 8O7 and 146O17 on the Medicago truncatula Linkage Group 1 that Contains the NIP Gene

Description: The Medicago truncatula NIP gene is located on M. truncatula Linkage Group 1. Informative recombinants showed crossovers that localize the NIP gene between markers 146O17 and 23C16D. Marker 164N9 co-segregates with the NIP gene, and the location of marker 164N9 is between markers 146O17 and 23C16D. Based upon data from the Medicago genome sequencing project, a subset of the model legume Medicago truncatula bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) were used to create a physical map on the DNA in this genetic internal. BACs near the potential NIP gene location near marker 164N9 were identified, and used in experiments to predict the physical map by a BAC-by-BAC strategy. Using marker 164N9 as a center point, and chromosome walking outward, the physical map toward markers 146O17 and 23C16D was built. The chromosome walk consisted of a virtual walk, made with existing sequence of BACs from the Medicago genome project, hybridizations to filters containing BAC DNA, and PCR reactions to confirm that predicted overlapping BACs contained DNA that yielded similar PCR products. In addition, the primers which are made for physical mapping via PCR could be good genetic markers helpful in discovering the location of the NIP gene. As a result of efforts repotted here, gap in physical map between marker 164N9 and 146O17 was closed.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Lee, Yi-Ching
Partner: UNT Libraries

Gene Expression Profiling of the nip Mutant in Medicago truncatula

Description: The study of root nodule symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and leguminous plant species is important because of the ability to supplement fixed nitrogen fertilizers and increase plant growth in poor soils. Our group has isolated a mutant called nip in the model legume Medicago truncatula that is defective in nodule symbiosis. The nip mutant (numerous infections with polyphenolics) becomes infected by Sinorhizobium meliloti but then accumulates polyphenolic defense compounds in the nodule and fails to progress to a stage where nitrogen fixation can occur. Analysis of the transcriptome of nip roots prior to inoculation with rhizobia was undertaken using Affymetric Medicago Genome Array microarrays. The total RNA of 5-day old uninoculated seedlings was analyzed in triplicate to screen for the NIP gene based on downregulated transcript levels in the mutant as compared to wild type. Further microarray data was generated from 10 days post inoculation (dpi) nip and wild type plants. Analysis of the most highly downregulated transcripts revealed that the NIP gene was not identifiable based on transcript level. Putative gene function was assigned to transcripts with altered expression patterns in order to characterize the nip mutation phenotypically as inferred from the transcriptome. Functional analysis revealed a large number of chaperone proteins were highly expressed in the nip mutant, indicating high stress in the mutant prior to infection by rhizobia. Additionally, a database containing the information regarding the nip expression profile at both 0 days post inoculation (dpi) and 10 dpi were created for screening of candidate genes as predicted from sequence in the genomic region containing NIP.
Date: August 2007
Creator: McKethan, Brandon Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Putative Transporter is Essential for Integrating Nutrient and Hormone Signaling with Lateral Root Growth and Nodule Development in Medicago truncatula

Description: This article discusses a putative transporter for integrating nutrient and hormone signaling with lateral root growth and nodule development in Medicago truncatula.
Date: 2010
Creator: Yendrek, Craig R.; Lee, Yi-Ching; Morris, Viktoriya; Liang, Yan; Pislariu, Catalina I.; Burkart, Graham et al.
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

A WD40 Repeat Protein from Medicago truncatula Is Necessary for Tissue-Specific Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis But Not for Trichome Development

Description: Article discussing how WD40 repeat protein from Medicago truncatula is necessary for tissue-specific anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis but not for trichome development.
Date: November 2009
Creator: Pang, Yongzhen; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Saathoff, Katie; Peel, Gregory J.; Wen, Jiangqi; Huhman, David et al.
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Characterization of Infection Arrest Mutants of Medicago Truncatula and Genetic Mapping of Their Respective Genes.

Description: In response to compatible rhizobia, leguminous plants develop unique plant organs, root nodules, in which rhizobia fix nitrogen into ammonia. During nodule invasion, the rhizobia gain access to newly divided cells, the nodule primordia, in the root inner cortex through plant-derived cellulose tubes called infection threads. Infection threads begin in curled root hairs and bring rhizobia into the root crossing several cell layers in the process. Ultimately the rhizobia are deposited within nodule primordium cells through a process resembling endocytosis. Plant host mechanisms underlying the formation and regulation of the invasion process are not understood. To identify and clone plant genes required for nodule invasion, recent efforts have focused on Medicago truncatula. In a collaborative effort the nodulation defect in the lin (lumpy infections) mutant was characterized. From an EMS-mutagenized population of M. truncatula, two non-allelic mutants nip (numerous infections with polyphenolics) and sli (sluggish infections) were identified with defects in nodule invasion. Infection threads were found to proliferate abnormally in the nip mutant nodules with only very rare deposition of rhizobia within plant host cells. nip nodules were found to accumulate polyphenolic compounds, indicative of a host defense response. Interestingly, nip was also found to have defective lateral root elongation suggesting that NIP has a role in both nodule and lateral root development. NIP was found to map at the upper arm of chromosome 1. In sli, infection threads were observed to bring rhizobia from infection threads to newly divided nodule primordium cells in the roots inner cortex. Polyphenolic accumulation in sli nodule/bumps was found. Lateral roots in sli were found to be clustered at the top of the root, indicating that sli like nip may be defective in lateral root development.
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Date: May 2005
Creator: Veereshlingam, Harita
Partner: UNT Libraries