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Evaluating a Doctoral Program in College and University Teaching: A Single Case Study

Description: This study assessed alumni of the College and University Teaching Program at the University of North Texas and how they perceived the training they received. Three hundred sixty alumni holding a college and university teaching degree were surveyed. One hundred forty-two usable questionnaires were returned. A response rate of 39.4 % was achieved. A survey instrument was used to gather alumni perceptions of learning experiences, academics, and professional benefits as a result of earning a doctorate in the major of college and university teaching at the University of North Texas. Alumni were asked their perceptions on the following: 1) the quality of graduate professional education in college and university teaching degree program, 2) whether they thought the goals and objectives of the program were met, and 3) their recommendations regarding the college and university teaching degree program. It is the overall opinion of the alumni that the quality of the graduate education in college and university teaching degree program was high. The majority of alumni indicated that the program should be reinstated and continued and if the program was still available they would recommend it to others.
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Date: August 2006
Creator: Kraus, Janine Stillwell
Partner: UNT Libraries

Theological Distance Learning through Trinity College and Theological Seminary: Programs, Problems, Perceptions, and Prospects

Description: An international survey was conducted to assess theological higher education via distance learning as perceived by graduates of Trinity College and Theological Seminary's (Trinity) doctoral programs. The purpose of the study was to determine student-perceived strengths and weaknesses of Trinity's doctoral-level distance education theology programs. Also, the future of distance-learning mediated programs of theological higher education was speculated. A random sample of 400 doctoral recipients was selected from the population of 802 doctoral recipients who graduated from Trinity between the years of 1969 and March 1998. A mailed questionnaire was used to collect data. A total of 203 (50.0%) were returned. Frequency counts, percentage distributions, and chi-square tests of goodness-of-fit were employed to analyze the data. A profile of the modal type of student who would participate in theological distance education at the doctoral level was developed from the demographic variables queried. Responses to questions regarding respondents' educational experiences and coursework were solicited as well. Respondents identified five primary strengths of Trinity's distance education doctoral programs as: the convenience of the program; the immediate application of course content to personal and professional endeavors; the quality of education provided; the Biblical groundedness of the curricula, the materials, and the faculty; and the required reading and research. The three predominant weaknesses of Trinity's distance education doctoral programs as identified by program graduates include: the lack of interaction between students and faculty; the lack of regional accreditation; and course repetitiveness meaning that some courses offered repeated content from prior studies at a lower educational level. It was concluded that the future of theological higher education via distance learning is promising. Trinity has emerged as a dominant distance learning institution as a result of its continued exploration and advancements. However, Trinity and other similar distance education institutions must continually and consistently evaluate their programs ...
Date: August 1999
Creator: Ray, Abby A. (Abby Adams)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Career Paths of Presidents of Institutions Belonging to the Coalition for Christian Colleges and Universities

Description: This study described the career paths of presidents of institutions of higher education which constitute the Coalition for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU). This study identified the demographic characteristics of the CCCU presidents and compared the career paths of the CCCU presidents with a corresponding national profile of American college presidents.
Date: August 1998
Creator: Plotts, John G. (John George)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Historical Development and Future of the Southern Bible Institute

Description: This study represents qualitative, historical research. The study documented the origins, milestones, and development of the Southern Bible Institute in Dallas, Texas. This study provided data leading to a better understanding of the impact of segregation on the African American religious community in Dallas, Texas. Data from this study also shows how African Americans responded to segregation in the area of theological higher education through the establishment of the Southern Bible Institute. The research methodology was heavily dependent on oral data from various sources and pertinent data were extrapolated from oral history interviews and historical, internal and external institutional documents. Analysis was based on accuracy, consistency and authenticity. Triangulation was the method used to determine the accuracy and authenticity of the oral interviews. The data were also analyzed for extrapolating factors that lend themselves to inclusion on an institutional assessment. Based on the factors extrapolated from the data and from a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, an internal institutional assessment checklist was created to assist the leadership in evaluating various aspects of the school. It was concluded that the future seems bright for the Southern Bible Institute, but it is recommended that the administration leverage off identified strengths and establish a plan for addressing the weaknesses noted as a result of this study. The Southern Bible Institute warrants further research that will use the factors identified in this study as the basis for quantitative studies that will clarify the impact of particular factors on institutional growth.
Date: May 2008
Creator: Cooks, Michael J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Christian Liberal Arts Higher Education in Russia: A Case Study of the Russian-American Christian University

Description: This is a case study of the historical development of a private Christian faith-based school of higher education in post-Soviet Russia from its conception in 1990 until 2006. This bi-national school was founded as the Russian-American Christian University (RACU) in 1996. In 2003, RACU was accredited by the Russian Ministry of Education under the name Russko-Americansky Christiansky Institute. RACU offers two state-accredited undergraduate academic programs: 1) business and economics, and 2) social work. RACU also offers a major in English language and literature. The academic model of RACU was designed according to the traditional American Christian liberal arts model and adapted to Russian higher education system. The study documents the founding, vision, and growth of RACU. It provides insight into the academic, organizational, and campus life of RACU. The study led to the creation of an operational framework of the historical development of RACU. The study also provides recommendations for the development of new Christian liberal arts colleges and universities based on the experience and the underlying structure of RACU.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Titarchuk, Victor N.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chief Student Affairs Officers in 4-Year Public Institutions of Higher Education: An Exploratory Investigation Into Their Conflict Management Styles and Praxis

Description: This study investigated the conflict management styles of chief student affairs officers in 4-year public institutions of higher education in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The data for the study were collected using Hall's Conflict Management Survey. The sample for the study consisted of 25 chief student affairs officers. The purpose of the study was to identify the conflict management style preferences of chief student affairs officers. The other variables studied to ascertain if they had an impact on the style preferences were age, gender, number of years of experience as a chief student affairs officer, ethnicity, and the size (enrollment) of their employing institution. The study found statistically significant associations (p<.05) between ethnicity and conflict management style, specifically the synergistic and win-lose styles, and between the synergistic style and age. The association between ethnicity and conflict management style could be attributed to the fact that the Caucasian group of chief student affairs officers comprised 66.7 % of the synergistic styles and 100 % of the win-lose styles. The association between the synergistic style and age could be due to the fact that the majority of the chief student affairs officers had a synergistic style, and of that group, 66.7 % were in the 50-59 age range. No statistically significant associations were found for correlations between conflict management style and gender; conflict management styles and number of years of experience as a chief student affairs officer; or conflict management styles and size (enrollment) of their employing institutions. The lack of significance shows that there are no associations between the conflict management styles of chief student affairs officers stratified according to gender, number of years of experience, and size (enrollment) of their employing institutions.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Van Duser, Trisha Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Association Between Attributional Styles and Academic Performance of Students in a Program of Religious Studies

Description: The problem addressed in this study was to determine if a significant association exists between attributions and academic achievement among students in a program of religious training at a Bible college. The research was designed to ascertain if optimistic attributions are more frequently associated with students in programs of religious education than with students in a public state-supported university environment. No significant correlation was found between optimistic explanatory styles and the academic achievement of Bible college students. A significant positive difference was found to exist between the explanatory styles of students at The Criswell College and students at the University of North Texas. Students in religious courses of study tended toward attributions for negative events that were external, unstable, and specific. The University of North Texas students tended toward attributions for negative events that were internal, stable, and global.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Ward, Charles W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Hebrew Wisdom as the Sitz im Leben for Higher Education in Ancient Israel

Description: This research grows out of an interest in what scholars commonly call the wisdom tradition of the ancient near east. This tradition or movement involved groups of thinkers and writers, known collectively as scribes, who were concerned in a philosophical way with the problems of living, and with principles of living well. Such communities are known to have flourished in Egypt, the various kingdoms of Mesopotamia, and western Asia, from at least the middle of the third millennium B.C. These scribal communities are also known to have sponsored schools, intended primarily for training in statecraft and the professions, but also for training in the scribal profession per se. The documentary and historical record indicates that such schools provided education from the most rudimentary level of literacy and writing to the most advanced levels of scribal scholarship. These advanced levels of training were functionally equivalent to what is nowadays known as higher education; and the ideals, the philosophy, which guided this enterprise found expression in a corpus of literature bearing the name "wisdom." The problem for this dissertation is whether or not there was in ancient Israel, specifically in the Solomonic era (10th century, B.C.), such an advanced scribal school associated with a Hebrew wisdom tradition. This is a research problem precisely because the evidence for such a school in Israel is both less abundant and less accessible than for the rest of the ancient near east.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Wells, C. Richard (Calvin Richard), 1949-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Social Integration Among Undergraduate Students With Physical Disabilities

Description: The study's purposes were to understand how students with physical disabilities perceive a) normative pressures identified in Weidman's (1989) Model of Undergraduate Socialization as affecting their social integration; b) their own disability as influencing their social integration; and c) their levels of satisfaction with social integration.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Hodges, Janet S.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Using the Stanislavski System to Teach Non-Realistic Acting

Description: This study examined Stanislavski's system as it was explained in his three books, An Actor Prepares, Building A Character, and Creating A Character. The study then examined the applicability of the Stanislavski System to the theaters of Bertolt Brecht and Absurdist theatre as represented by Harold Pinter and Samuel Beckett.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Lee, Edward D. (Edward Dale)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of an Interdisciplinary Course on Critical Thinking Skills

Description: The effect of an interdisciplinary algebra/science course on students' critical thinking skills was examined. A traditional college algebra course was used as a comparison group. The students in the sample enrolled in college algebra and then half were randomly placed into the interdisciplinary course. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest comparison group design was used. The Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal was used to measure the students' critical thinking skills. This instrument consists of an overall critical thinking score as well as five subscores in the areas of Inference, Recognition of Assumptions, Deduction, Interpretation and Evaluation of Arguments. It was found that the students in the interdisciplinary course made greater gains in the overall critical thinking score as well as in four of the five subscores. However, the differences in the gains made in the two courses were not statistically significant. Disregarding course, other factors that were found to be closely related to critical thinking were Composite ACT, grade received in the course, Math ACT and grade point average. It was also found that students whose majors were in the Schools of Arts and Letters or Science and Technology scored higher on critical thinking than students whose majors were in the Schools of Business or Education. Factors found to have no relationship to critical thinking were ethnicity, gender and classification.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Elliott, Brett M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Patronage Behavior of Elderly Consumers in the Purchase of Pharmaceuticals with Teaching and Learning Implications for American Higher Education

Description: This study concerned the impact lifestyles of the elderly have on purchases from different product categories. The main purpose was to determine, evaluate, and analyze the effects of lifestyles on elderly shoppers' choice of retail outlets.
Date: December 1993
Creator: Oates, Barbara R. (Barbara Ruth)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Burnout among Nursing Faculty in Texas

Description: The study analyzed burnout of nursing faculty to determine the frequency, intensity, and predictors of burnout. Christian Maslach's burnout questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and a demographic data survey were used to measure burnout. A random selection of 250 nursing faculty was mailed both a burnout questionnaire and a demographic data survey. There were 192 useable responses that were used in the study. Each questionnaire and demographic data survey were reviewed for completeness and rechecked for accurate data entry. The results were presented in summary tables. Data analysis included frequency, means, Pearson r, and downward, stepwise regression analyses. There was a high frequency and intensity of burnout in all nursing faculty, as measured in the three MBI subscales (depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment). There was a significant relationship between the number of hours nursing faculty spend with academic advising and the intensity of emotional exhaustion. None of the demographic data, except hours spent in academic advising, were a predictor of burnout.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Thomas, Nanci Terese
Partner: UNT Libraries

Design, Development, and Implementation of a Computer-Based Graphics Presentation for the Undergraduate Teaching of Functions and Graphing

Description: The problems with which this study was concerned were threefold: (a) to design a computer-based graphics presentation on the topics of functions and graphing, (b) to develop the presentation, and (c) to determine the instructional effectiveness of this computer-based graphics instruction. The computerized presentation was written in Authorware for the Macintosh computer. The population of this study consisted of three intermediate algebra classes at Collin County Community College (n = 51). A standardized examination, the Descriptive Tests of Mathematics Skills for Functions and Graphs, was used for pretest and posttest purposes. Means were calculated on these scores and compared using a t-test for correlated means. The level of significance was set at .01. The results of the data analysis indicated: 1. There was a significant difference between the pretest and posttest performance after exposure to the computer-based graphics presentation. 2. There was no significant gender difference between the pretest and posttest performance after exposure to the computer-based graphics presentation. 3. There was no significant difference between the pretest and posttest performance of the traditional and nontraditional age students after exposure to the computer-based graphics presentation. Females had a lower posttest score than the mean male posttest score, but an analysis of the differences showed no significance. Traditional age students had a higher posttest performance score than the mean traditional age student posttest score, but their pretest performance scores were higher as well. An analysis of the differences showed no significance. In summary, this computer-based graphics presentation was an effective teaching technique for increasing mathematics performance.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Karr, Rosemary McCroskey
Partner: UNT Libraries

Academic Dishonesty: Attitudes and Behaviors of Fundamentalist Christian College Students

Description: This study was designed to examine: (1) the extent to which cheating occurs in fundamentalist Christian colleges; (2) the attitudes of fundamentalist Christian college students toward cheating; (3) attitudes of fundamentalist Christian college students toward cheating among their peers; (4) the kinds of cheating practices of fundamentalist Christian college students; (5) the degree to which students engage in neutralizing behavior to justify cheating; (6) differences in cheating behaviors according to gender; (7) differences in cheating behaviors according to ethnicity; and (8) differences in cheating behaviors according to the length of duration of Christian commitment. Based upon the responses of 337 students attending 3 different Christian colleges, it was concluded that: (1) most Christian fundamentalist students do not engage in cheating; (2) respondents believe that each of 17 self-reported cheating behaviors are serious forms of cheating; (3) respondents are unlikely to report cheating among peers; (4) plagiarism is the most common cheating behavior; (5) most respondents justify cheating on the basis of the workload at school and the pressure to obtain good grades; (6) there are no differences in cheating behavior according to gender; (7) there are differences in cheating behavior according to groups; and (8) most respondents do not cheat regardless of the self-reported duration of Christian commitment.
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Date: December 2000
Creator: Sunday, William G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Writing Proficiency Among Graduate Students in Higher Education Programs

Description: This study explored the extent to which graduate students enrolled in Higher Education courses were proficient at writing. While writing proficiency has been extensively studied in elementary students, high school students, and undergraduates, little attention has been paid to formally evaluating graduate student proficiency. Despite the relatively new idea of assessing graduate student writing, it is a concern for graduate faculty and a valid area for study. This study was based on a sample of graduate students enrolled in at least one course in Higher Education at public institutions of higher education in the United States. A total sample size of 97 students was obtained. Two instruments were administered to the participants: A General Information and Writing Experience Questionnaire (G-WEQ) and the SAT II: Writing Test, Part B. The G-WEQ was designed to capture demographic information about the participants, as well as allow participants to provide a self-assessment of writing and describe the writing experiences they are currently encountering in graduate school. To assess writing proficiency for the participants, the SAT II: Writing Test, Part B was used. The purpose of the test is to "measure [test takers'] ability to...recognize faults in usage and structure, and to use language with sensitivity to meaning" (Educational Testing Service, 1999-2000, p.7). The z-Statistic for a Single Sample Mean significance test was used to determine whether the sample mean scored significantly higher than the population mean on the SAT II: Writing Test. This was not the case (z=0.295, p<0.38). The graduate students in this sample did not score significantly higher on the SAT II: Writing Test, Part B than the typical high school senior whose scores enter into the norm group.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Singleton-Jackson, Jill A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relationship of Community College Student Demographic and Pre-Enrollment Background Variables with Persistence and Retention

Description: Student retention is one of the most important issues facing higher education. The demand for accountability of higher education has pushed the issue of student retention to the forefront of its agenda. Increasingly, state legislatures are tying funding to institutional effectiveness, using graduation rates as measures of academic quality. Though there is an abundance of literature of studies conducted at the four year institution, few studies have examined the community college student. This study attempted to identify 4 specific pre-enrollment variables, (1) parent's education, (2) high school senior grade point average, (3) educational goals and (4) racial origin, as predictors of persistence and retention. The sample included 312 entering freshmen at North Lake College in Irving, Texas who were administered the College Student Inventory (CSI) in the fall semesters of 1995 and 1996. The 1995 cohort consisted of 201 entries, 103 (51.2%) female and 98 (48.8) male. The 1996 cohort consisted of 111 entries, 65 (58.5%) female and 46 (41.5%) male. A data base was constructed by extracting selected data elements from the completed inventory. Each student was tracked for one year following the semester they completed the survey. The Pearson Chi-Square Test of Independence with .05 level of significance as the criterion level of rejection was performed to identify significant variables tied to student persistence. The research found that 3 factors, high school senior GPA, parent's education level and family origin were significant predictors of attrition at the .05 level. These factors represent information that is typically available from the student's prior to entry into the college. All too often an at-risk student is identified once he/she is placed on academic probation prompting the student to leave the college. Institutions need to implement an early warning system to identify students who are at-risk before the problem becomes intractable. The ...
Date: August 1999
Creator: Coppola, William Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries

Faculty Use of the World Wide Web: Modeling Information Seeking Behavior in a Digital Environment

Description: There has been a long history of studying library users and their information seeking behaviors and activities. Researchers developed models to better understand these information seeking behaviors and activities of users. Most of these models were developed before the onset of the Internet. This research project studied faculty members' use of and their information seeking behaviors and activities on the Internet at Angelo State University, a Master's I institution. Using both a quantitative and qualitative methodology, differences were found between tenured and tenure-track faculty members on the perceived value of the Internet to meet their research and classroom information needs. Similar differences were also found among faculty members in the broad discipline areas of the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Tenure-track faculty members reported a higher average Internet use per week than tenured faculty members. Based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with seven tenured and seven tenure-track faculty members, an Internet Information Seeking Activities Model was developed to describe the information seeking activities on the Internet by faculty members at Angelo State University. The model consisted of four basic stages of activities: "Gathering," "Validating," "Linking" with a sub-stage of "Re-validating," and "Monitoring." There were two parallel stages included in the model. These parallel stages were "Communicating" and "Mentoring." The Internet Information Seeking Activities Model was compared to the behavioral model of information seeking by faculty members developed by Ellis. The Internet Model placed a greater emphasis on validating information retrieved from the Internet. Otherwise there were no other substantive changes to Ellis' model.
Date: December 2000
Creator: Fortin, Maurice G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Faculty Attitudes Toward Residential and Distance Learning: A Case Study in Instructional Mode Preferences Among Theological Seminary Faculty

Description: Twenty-first century learners have bought into a cafeteria-style mentality for obtaining higher education that learning should be available at the student's convenience. Institutions that ignore this postmodern trend will likely find their applicant pools dwindling along with significant reductions in entering class sizes. Students will simply choose other schools able to provide respected, accredited, and useful learning which fits their busy lifestyles. Since 1987, Dallas Theological Seminary (Texas), a 76-year-old graduate school of theology in the conservative, evangelical, free-church movement, has offered distance learning classes in both extension and print-based delivery models. Because the faculty plays a pivotal role in the successful or unsuccessful implementation of online courses (McKenzie, Mims, Bennett, & Waugh, 2000), the present study uncovered the attitudes of full-time, graduate theological faculty at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS) regarding distance learning and the likelihood of faculty to adopt this delivery innovation. Bruce Manning's (1976) Trouble-Shooting Checklist (TSC) for Higher Education Institutions was the instrument used in the study. The TSC is a nonparametric test designed to uncover differences between the observed and expected levels of acceptance that a department, program, or institution possesses regarding change toward distance learning in contrast to residential learning. The checklist's two major purposes are to provide an overall norm-referenced, predictive score estimating the organization's likelihood of adopting and implementing an innovation and to profile the strengths and weaknesses of an organization's environment (culture) relative to the adoption and implementation of innovations. Five scales provide a comprehensive understanding of the organizational climate, personality and leadership characteristics of participants, communication pathways within the organization, the degree of sophistication or expertise within the organization, and the receptivity of the students. An official administration of the instrument was conducted involving all full-time faculty at DTS. Frequency counts, percentage distributions, and the chi-square goodness-of-fit statistic were used to ...
Date: May 2003
Creator: Scott, Benjamin G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Enrollment Management in Higher Education: From Theory to Practice

Description: This study investigated enrollment management practices found in higher education. The research identified enrollment management and retention practices described in the higher education literature. These suggested practices were incorporated into a sixty-six question survey that was distributed to a random sample of colleges and universities taken from the 1999 US News and World Report of college rankings. The survey data were used to identify which of the suggested enrollment management practices were of greatest utility. First, the sixty-six items were grouped into 14 categories of enrollment management strategies. Second, the institutional responses for each category were averaged and then correlated with each institution's graduation rate. Finally, each institution's "yes" responses for the entire survey were totaled and correlated with each institution's graduation rate. This study developed a list of the 26 most frequently used enrollment management practices in higher education, and as well, identified the 10 least used enrollment management practices. Given the results of this study graduation rate is not a sufficient criterion to assess enrollment management practices at a college or university. Enrollment management strategies contribute to many institutional and student outcomes; thus, multiple indicators are required to accurately evaluate enrollment management practices.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Clark, V. Allen
Partner: UNT Libraries

Graduate Professional Training in Christian Education at Dallas Theological Seminary and Alumni Perceptions of Program Quality

Description: This study assessed the quality of graduate professional training in Christian education at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS) in terms of the perceptions of program alumni. The subjects of the investigation were 780 alumni who graduated from DTS between 1984 and 2000. The Christian Education program was assessed utilizing Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP model and alumni data collected from a survey instrument. A response rate of 65% (N=504) was achieved. The research procedure employed a non-experimental design methodology for the quantitative component and open-ended questions for the qualitative component. Most results were statistically significant at the .05 alpha level utilizing chi-square goodness-of-fit tests.
Date: May 2002
Creator: McLaughlin, Linden D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Rural Community Colleges and the Nursing Shortage in Severely Distressed Counties

Description: The United States is in the middle of a gripping nursing shortage; a shortage that is putting patients' lives in danger. This study determined the impact community and tribal colleges in severely economically distressed counties of the United States have on the nursing shortage faced by health care facilities serving these areas. The initial sample of 24 institutions selected in the Ford Foundation's Rural Community College Initiative (RCCI) (1995-2000). Data were collected from the Fall 1998 National Study of Post Secondary Faculty to obtain characteristics of faculty and from the 2003 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) to obtain characteristics of students, both at all publicly-controlled community colleges, all tribal colleges, and the 24 RCCI colleges that included 18 community and six tribal colleges. A survey was sent to the directors/deans/chairs of the nursing programs to ascertain issues related to the nursing program, nursing faculty, and nursing students. Respondents were asked to identify the healthcare facilities used for students' clinical experiences. A survey was then sent to each of these facilities asking about rural health, and source of nursing staff. Findings: 1) 87% of these these rural healthcare facilities are experiencing a significant shortage of nurses, and they are challenged to recruit and retain nursing staff; 2) Nursing programs, including both Licensed Practical Nursing and Associate's Degree Nursing are important to these rural community and tribal colleges, have seen growth over the past 5 years and expect to continue growth (86%); 3) Financial aid for nursing students is critically important; 4) Students are predominantly white and female; minorities are significantly under-represented; 5) Lack of subsidized public transportation and child care for nursing students even at tribal colleges are barriers that impact program completion; and 6) A shortage of nursing faculty exists at rural community and tribal colleges that negatively impacts ...
Date: August 2005
Creator: Reid, Mary Beth
Partner: UNT Libraries

Recreation Program Participation by Older Adults: Its Relationship to Perceived Freedom in Leisure and Life Satisfaction

Description: This study examined the contribution of several variables to the prediction of perceived freedom in leisure (PFL) and life satisfaction in older adults. Demographic, health and socioeconomic variables were compared with participation in recreation programs, church involvement and PFL. Church involvement was viewed as a leisure activity rather than a measure of religiosity. The survey instrument incorporated all these variables and was pretested and revised before use in the study. The sample consisted of 198 persons 60 years of age and older who were members of two Southern Baptist churches. Subjects were randomly selected, but persons considered by church staff members to be incapable of completing the survey were eliminated. Surveys were hand delivered and picked up by volunteer workers, and a 38 percent return rate was obtained. Alpha reliability for the church involvement, PFL and life satisfaction scales in the instrument were .87, .94, and .77, respectively. Frequency counts and percentages or means and standard deviations were calculated for the demographic variables. Subjects were categorized by level of involvement in church and community recreation programs. Persons involved in community but not church recreation programs were underrepresented in the sample. A selective sampling procedure was utilized to obtain more respondents in this category, but the data from these individuals were analyzed separately. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were utilized to ascertain the impact of different variables upon PFL and life satisfaction. Three predictors of PFL emerged— participation in recreation programs, church involvement and satisfaction with health. Correlations between these variables and life satisfaction were consistent with the findings in the literature. Inclusion of church involvement, participation in recreation programs and, for the life satisfaction analysis, PFL raised the percentage of variance explained. Thus, greater predictive power emerged using these variables than when only demographic, health and socioeconomic variables were included.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Baack, Sharon Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

Socioeconomic Backgrounds of Educators and Their Attitudes Toward Women as Academic Administrators

Description: The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship, if any, between the socioeconomic backgrounds of educators and their attitudes toward women as academic administrators, including a comparison of the attitudes of male and female educators toward women as administrators. The population consisted of all full time faculty and administrators in 25 colleges and universities holding membership in the Association for Higher Education (AHE) of North Texas during the 1984/1S85 academic year. This group of institutions consists of 10 community/junior colleges and 15 senior colleges and universities. Data generation was achieved through the administration of a research package mailed to a sample of 300 subjects selected by a proportionate random process from the defined population. The instruments consisted of a modified version of the Women As Managers Scale (WAMS) and the Hollingshead Factor Index of Social Status. Useable data from 209 respondents were subjected to multiple regression techniques. The hypothesis that socioeconomic background of educators will be positively related to attitudes toward women as academic administrators was not upheld. It was however determined that attitudes toward women as administrators are explanable by a combination of job and non-job related variables, with women having more positive attitudes than men. The findings that 1) younger subjects have more positive attitudes, 2) experience under a female superordinate, generated favorable comments, and 3) educators as a whole had a highly favorable attitude lead to the conclusion that opportunities for advancement of women into adminstrative positions are brighter than often reported. It is suspected that the legislative activities and the feminist movement of the 1960s may have had a positive influence.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Okoro, Gregory I. (Gregory Ifeanyi)
Partner: UNT Libraries