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Catalog of the University of North Texas, 2007-2008, Graduate

Description: The UNT Graduate Bulletin includes information about class offerings as well as general information about the university (academic calendar, admissions and degree requirements, financial information, etc.) about research, and about the colleges and schools on campus. Index starts on page 455.
Date: July 2007
Creator: University of North Texas
Partner: UNT Libraries

Catalog of the University of North Texas, 2005-2006, Graduate

Description: The UNT Graduate Bulletin includes information about class offerings as well as general information about the university (academic calendar, admissions and degree requirements, financial information, etc.) about research, and about the colleges and schools on campus. Index starts on page 447.
Date: July 2005
Creator: University of North Texas
Partner: UNT Libraries

Catalog of the University of North Texas, 2008-2009, Graduate

Description: The UNT Graduate Bulletin includes information about class offerings as well as general information about the university (academic calendar, admissions and degree requirements, financial information, etc.) about research, and about the colleges and schools on campus. Index starts on page 477.
Date: July 2008
Creator: University of North Texas
Partner: UNT Libraries

Catalog of the University of North Texas, 2006-2007, Graduate

Description: The UNT Graduate Bulletin includes information about class offerings as well as general information about the university (academic calendar, admissions and degree requirements, financial information, etc.) about research, and about the colleges and schools on campus. Index starts on page 441.
Date: July 2006
Creator: University of North Texas
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of It Process Support, Process Visualization and Process Characteristics on Process Outcomes

Description: Business process re-engineering (part of the Business Process Management domain) is among the top three concerns of Information Technology (IT) leaders and is deemed to be one of many important IT leveraging opportunities. Two major challenges have been identified in relation to BPM and the use of IT. The first challenge is related to involving business process participants in process improvement initiatives using BPM systems. BPM technologies are considered to be primarily targeted for developers and not BPM users, and the need to engage process participants into process improvement initiatives is not addressed, contributing to the business-IT gap. The second challenge is related to potential de-skilling of knowledge workers when knowledge-intensive processes are automated and process knowledge resides in IT, rather than human process participants. The two identified challenges are not separate issues. Process participants need to be knowledgeable about the process in order to actively contribute to BPM initiatives, and the loss of process knowledge as a result of passive use of automated systems may further threaten their participation in process improvement. In response to the call for more research on the individual impacts of business process initiatives, the purpose of this dissertation study is to understand the relationship between IT configurations (particularly process support and process visualization), process characteristics and individual level process outcomes, such as task performance and process knowledge. In the development of the research model we rely on organizational knowledge creation literature and scaffolding in Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development, business process modeling and workflow automation research, as well as research on the influence of IT on individual performance. The theoretical model is tested empirically in experimental settings using a series of two studies. In both studies participants were asked to complete tasks as part of a business process using different versions of a mock-up ...
Date: December 2013
Creator: Al Beayeyz, Alaa
Partner: UNT Libraries

Enterprise Social Software: an Empirical Assessment of Knowledge Sharing in the Workplace

Description: Social software has become pervasive including technologies such as blogs, wikis, and social networking sites. Interactive Web 2.0 technology is distinguished from earlier Internet channels, with content provided not only from the website host, but also and most importantly, user-generated content. These social technologies are increasingly entering the enterprise, involving complex social and psychological aspects as well as an understanding of traditional technology acceptance factors. Organizations trying to reap potential benefits of enterprise social software (ESS) must successfully implement and maintain ESS tools. This research develops a framework for assessing knowledge sharing based on reciprocal determinism theory and augmented with technology acceptance, sociological, and psychological factors. Semi-structured interviews with IT professionals, followed by a written survey of employees using ESS are used to collect data. The hermeneutic circle methodology is used to analyze the interview transcripts and structural equation modeling is used to analyze the survey data. Results show technological advantage has no significant effect on the intention to share knowledge, but community cohesiveness and individual willingness significantly affect knowledge sharing intention and behavior. The study offers a synthesized model of variables affecting knowledge sharing as well as a better understanding of best practices for organizations to consider when implementing and maintaining ESS tools for employee knowledge sharing and collaboration.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Harden, Gina
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Business Intelligence Components on the Quality of Decision Making

Description: Decision makers require the right information at the right time, in the right place and in the right format so that they can make good decisions. Although business intelligence (BI) has the potential to improve decision making, there is little empirical evidence of how well this has been achieved. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the quality of decisions made using BI. The research question it addresses is what are the key antecedents of decision quality for users of business intelligence systems? The theoretical support for the model is developed based on the literature review that draws on decision support systems (DSS), group decision support systems (GDSS), and BI. Grounded on this literature review, the antecedents of decision quality are operationalized in this dissertation through independent variables such as the problem space complexity, the level of BI usage, the BI user experience, and information quality. The dependent variable is operationalized as decision quality and it captures the self-satisfaction with a decision made by users in a BI environment. The research model was tested using a survey of BI users whose names were provided by a marketing company. This research suggests that BI user experience is a more complex construct than has been initially thought.
Date: May 2013
Creator: Visinescu, Lucian L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Decision Makers’ Cognitive Biases in Operations Management: An Experimental Study

Description: Behavioral operations management (BOM) has gained popularity in the last two decades. The main theme in this new stream of research is to include the human behavior in Operations Management (OM) models to increase the effectiveness of such models. BOM is classified into 4 areas: cognitive psychology, social psychology, group dynamics and system dynamics (Bendoly et al. 2010). This dissertation will focus on the first class, namely cognitive psychology. Cognitive psychology is further classified into heuristics and biases. Tversky and Kahneman (1974) discussed 3 heuristics and 13 cognitive biases that usually face decision makers. This dissertation is going to study 6 cognitive biases under the representativeness heuristic. The model in this dissertation states that cognitive reflection of the individual (Frederick 2005) and training about cognitive biases in the form of warning (Kaufmann and Michel 2009) will help decisions’ makers make less biased decisions. The 6 cognitive biases investigated in this dissertation are insensitivity to prior probability, insensitivity to sample size, misconception of chance, insensitivity to predictability, the illusion of validity and misconception of regression. 6 scenarios in OM contexts have been used in this study. Each scenario corresponds to one cognitive bias. Experimental design has been used as the research tool. To see the impact of training, one group of the participants received the scenarios without training and the other group received them with training. The training consists of a brief description of the cognitive bias as well as an example of the cognitive bias. Cognitive reflection is operationalized using cognitive reflection test (CRT). The survey was distributed to students at University of North Texas (UNT). Logistic regression has been employed to analyze data. The research shows that participants show the cognitive biases proposed by Tversky and Kahneman. Moreover, CRT is significant factor to predict the cognitive bias in two ...
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Date: May 2016
Creator: Alkhars, Mohammed
Partner: UNT Libraries

A social capital perspective on IT professionals' work behavior and attitude.

Description: Abstract Attracting and developing information technology (IT) professionals is one of the top concerns for companies. Although much research has been conducted about the job behavior and attitudes of IT professionals over the last three decades, findings are inconclusive and contradictory. This suggests that something may be missing in how we examine this phenomenon. Most of this research is drawn from theories of motivation, very little examines the effect of social relationships on IT professionals' behavior and attitude. Yet, social capital theory suggests that job behavior and attitude may be greatly influenced by these relationships. This suggests that IT professionals' social capital warrants empirical examination. The primary research question that this dissertation addresses is how social capital affects IT professionals' work attitude and behavior including job satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior, job performance and turnover intention. The research model in this dissertation examines the influence of three aspects of social capital on IT professionals' job attitude and work behavior: tie strength, the number of ties and the structural holes. Data were collected from 129 IT professionals from a range of jobs, organizations and industries. Results indicate that tie strength in the organization of an IT professional is positively related to job satisfaction. The number of ties outside an organization an IT professional has is also positively related to job performance. However, hypotheses about organizational citizenship behavior and turnover intention are not supported. Several implications for organizational executives and managers are offered based on findings.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Zhang, Lixuan
Partner: UNT Libraries