Search Results

Salaries of Members of Congress: Recent Actions and Historical Tables

Description: This report contains information on the pay procedure and recent adjustments. It also contains historical information on the rate of pay for Members of Congress since 1789; the adjustments projected by the Ethics Reform Act as compared to actual adjustments in Member pay; details on past legislation enacted with language prohibiting the annual pay adjustment; and Member pay in constant and current dollars since 1992.
Date: October 27, 2014
Creator: Brudnick, Ida A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tax Deductible Expenses: The BP Case

Description: Following the release of BP's second quarter earning statement, which showed a $10 billion reduction in tax liability for oil-spill-related cleanup and expenses, media headlines have generated public concern, and in some cases outrage, over these tax savings. Further, the ability of BP to realize these tax savings has generated a number of inquiries as to how and why BP is entitled to this reduction in tax liability. This report discusses the nature of BP's $10 billion "credit" and the nature of corporate tax deductions.
Date: August 11, 2010
Creator: Sherlock, Molly F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion from the National Security Personnel System to Other Pay Schedules: Issues for Congress

Description: This report focuses on the transition of employees from National Security Personnel System (NSPS) to non-NSPS pay systems. It does not address the operation of NSPS or other pay schedules. The report discusses how the transition is scheduled to occur and analyzes congressional options for oversight or legislative action.
Date: August 4, 2010
Creator: Ginsberg, Wendy R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion from the National Security Personnel System to Other Pay Schedules: Issues for Congress

Description: This report focuses on the transition of employees from National Security Personnel System (NSPS) to non-NSPS pay systems. It does not address the operation of NSPS or other pay schedules. The report discusses how the transition is scheduled to occur and analyzes congressional options for oversight or legislative action.
Date: July 15, 2010
Creator: Ginsberg, Wendy R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salaries of Members of Congress: Recent Actions and Historical Tables

Description: This report provides historical tables on the rate of pay for Members of Congress since 1789; details on enacted legislation with language prohibiting the automatic annual pay adjustment since the most recent adjustment; the adjustments projected by the Ethics Reform Act as compared with actual adjustments in Member pay; and Member pay in constant and current dollars since 1992.
Date: December 23, 2015
Creator: Brudnick, Ida A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salaries of Members of Congress: Congressional Votes, 1990-2015

Description: This report discusses the process through which members of Congress are compensated. Members of Congress only receive salaries during the terms for which they are elected. Former Members may be eligible for retirement benefits. This report contains information on actions taken affecting each pay year since the establishment of the Ethics Reform Act adjustment procedure, as well as information on other relevant floor action.
Date: December 23, 2015
Creator: Brudnick, Ida A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salaries of Members of Congress: Recent Actions and Historical Tables

Description: This report provides historical tables on the rate of pay for Members of Congress since 1789; details on enacted legislation with language prohibiting the automatic annual pay adjustment since the most recent adjustment; the adjustments projected by the Ethics Reform Act as compared with actual adjustments in Member pay; and Member pay in constant and current dollars since 1992.
Date: September 17, 2015
Creator: Brudnick, Ida A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Housing characteristics 1993

Description: This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.
Date: June 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Factors that affect electric-utility stranded commitments

Description: Estimates of stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned utilities range widely, with many falling in the range of $100 to $200 billion. These potential losses exist because some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts and fuel-supply contracts, regulatory assets, and expenses for public-policy programs have book values that exceed their expected market values under full competition. This report quantifies the sensitivity of stranded- commitment estimates to the various factors that lead to these above- market-value estimates. The purpose of these sensitivity analyses is to improve understanding on the part of state and federal regulators, utilities, customers, and other electric-industry participants about the relative importance of the factors that affect stranded- commitment amounts.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Hirst, E.; Hadley, S. & Baxter, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Profile of the population in need

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a national evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, an energy efficiency program that provides financial assistance to qualifying low-income households for the {open_quotes}weatherization{close_quotes} of their housing units. The evaluation, being conducted for the Department by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is comprised of five studies. One of the five is a two-part analysis of the scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program and other resources devoted to low-income energy efficiency, including the number of dwellings weatherized to date and the population remaining to be served. This study is referred to here as the {open_quotes}Scope{close_quotes} study. This report presents the results of the second part of the {open_quotes}Scope{close_quotes} study, which investigates the characteristics of the population eligible for and in need of the DOE Weatherization Assistance Program - The Profile of the Population in Need. The {open_quotes}Profile{close_quotes} study is an attempt to use the Energy Information Administration`s Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 1990 to define the weatherization-related characteristics of the low-income population. The RECS, a national survey with a sample size of 5,095 households, is the most reliable source for information regarding residential energy-use and housing characteristics because data is collected from fuel vendors on actual household energy bills and consumption for a large and representative sample of households.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Eisenberg, J.F.; Michels, E.; Carroll, D. & Berdux, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies

Description: The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is unlikely that the plant investments, jobs, and income associated with gas cooling exports would be retained within the United States. The prospects for significant gas cooling exports appear promising for a variety of reasons. There is an expanding need for cooling in the developing world, natural gas is widely available, electric infrastructures are over-stressed in many areas, and the cost of building new gas infrastructure is modest compared to the cost of new electric infrastructure. Global gas cooling competition is currently limited, with Japanese and U.S. companies, and their foreign business partners, the only product sources. U.S. manufacturers of HVAC products are well positioned to compete globally, and are already one of the faster growing goods-exporting sectors of the U.S. economy. Net HVAC exports grew by over 800 percent from 1987 to 1992 and currently exceed $2.6 billion annually (ARI 1994). Net gas cooling job and income creation are estimated using an economic input-output model to compare a reference case to a gas cooling scenario. The reference case reflects current policies, practices, and trends with respect to conventional electric cooling technologies. The gas cooling scenario examines the impact of accelerated use of natural gas cooling technologies here and abroad.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Hughes, P.J. & Laitner, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Future World Energy Constraints and the Direction for Solutions

Description: This paper was originally written in response to the concern that rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere caused by burning of fossil fuels will ultimately contribute to global warming. Now we are beginning to see evidence of coming problems in the supply of fuels for transportation. This paper describes the benefits of adequate energy supply and the problems of future energy supply. Partial solutions are suggested for immediate application as well as longer term solutions to address both of these concerns. To evaluate the situation and solutions we must understand: (1) how much primary energy is currently used world-wide and might be needed in 2100, (2) how important energy is to the welfare of people, (3) the forms of energy sources and end uses and (4) where new sources may come from. The major portion of world primary energy demand is provided by fossil fuels. This portion dropped from 93% in 1970 to 85% in 1995, mainly because of the increased use of nuclear energy. How ever, since the mid-1990s fossil fuels have maintained their 85% share of world energy supply. The importance of the relationship between per capita energy consumption and per capita income for the world is discussed. The limits of conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energies are examined. The contribution of renewable energies is compared to 41 different views of world energy demand in 2100. Without new technology for large scale storage of intermittent electricity from wind and solar the contribution of renewable energies is not likely to grow significantly beyond the current level of 7-8%. The paper offers conclusions and partial solutions that we can work on immediately. Examination of the forms of energy supplied by the sun, which is powered by nuclear fusion, and the way in which nuclear fission currently supplies energy to ...
Date: September 12, 2004
Creator: Lightfoot, H.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

US energy industry financial developments, First quarter 1995

Description: This report traces key developments in US energy companies` financial performance for the first quarter of 1995. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest. Return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations.
Date: June 19, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weatherization Works: Final Report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

Description: In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation's largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year. The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it saves energy, lowers fuel bills, and improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years. The Program's mission is to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families--particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Substantial progress has been made, but the job is far from over. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that the average low-income family spends 12 percent of its income on residential energy, compared to only 3% for the average-income family. Homes where low-income families live also have a greater need for energy efficiency improvements, but less money to pay for them.
Date: February 1, 2001
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weatherizing the Homes of Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Clients: A Programmatic Assessment

Description: The purpose of this project was to assess the relationships between two federal programs that support low income households, the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). The specific question addressed by this research is: what impact does weatherizing homes of LIHEAP recipients have on the level of need for LIHEAP assistance? The a priori expectation is that the level of need will decrease. If this is the case, then it can be argued that a non-energy benefit of WAP is the reduction in the level of need for LIHEAP assistance for households receiving weatherization assistance. The study area for this project was Boston, Massachusetts, which is representative of large northern urban areas. Additionally, Boston was chosen because one of its social service agencies, Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD), administers both WAP and LIHEAP programs. ABCD has a substantial client base of low-income households and was willing to cooperate in this study. In the State of Massachusetts, an income test is used to determine whether low-income households qualify for standard LIHEAP benefits. Benefits provided to eligible households are determined by a schedule that gauges benefit levels based on household income and number of members in the household. Additionally, households that consume large amounts of primary heating fuel can also qualify an additional high energy subsidy. It was expected that weatherization's biggest influence on the LIHEAP program would be in reducing the number of households qualifying for high energy subsidies. Data were collected for three groups of households that received both weatherization and LIHEAP assistance and for one control group that only received LIHEAP assistance. Table ES-1 indicates the sample sizes, weatherization dates, and winter time periods when changes in energy consumption and receipt of LIHEAP benefits could be expected to be observed. The ...
Date: September 16, 2002
Creator: Tonn, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonenergy Benefits from the Weatherization Assistance Program: A Summary of Findings from the Recent Literature

Description: The purpose of this project is to summarize findings reported in the recent literature on nonenergy benefits attributable to the weatherizing of low income homes. This study is a follow-up to the seminal research conducted on the nonenergy benefits attributable to the Department of Energy's national Weatherization Assistance Program by Brown et al. (1993). For this review, nonenergy benefits were broken into three major categories: (1) ratepayer benefits; (2) household benefits; and (3) societal benefits. The ratepayer benefits can be divided into two main subcategories: payment-related benefits and service provision benefits. Similarly, there are two key types of household benefits: those associated with affordable housing and those related to safety, health, and comfort. Societal benefits can be classified as either environmental, social, or economic. Fig. E.S. 1 presents point estimates of the average lifetime monetary value per weatherized home resulting from low income weatherization programs for the key benefit types listed above. These benefits represent net present value estimates (i.e., estimates of the current worth of all benefits expected over the lifetime of the weatherization measures), assuming a 20-year lifetime for installed energy efficiency measures and a 3.2% discount rate. Overall, societal benefits are estimated to be substantially larger than ratepayer and household benefits. Ranges for the societal benefits are also much greater than for the other two categories of nonenergy benefits. The total monetized value for all nonenergy benefit categories associated with weatherizing a home is estimated to be $3346, in 2001 dollars. This represents a national average which, like any point estimate, has considerable uncertainty associated with it. This figure is substantially higher than the total value of nonenergy benefits presented a decade ago in the national weatherization evaluation (Brown et al. 1993) because the current study quantified a much broader array of benefits than did the earlier ...
Date: April 25, 2002
Creator: Schweitzer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Effects of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences (JINS) on the State of Tennessee

Description: This report provides an analysis of the economic impacts arising from the construction and operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Joint Institute of Neutron Science (JINS) facilities on the State of Tennessee. The study was conducted by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in cooperation with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Science Alliance at UTK. Estimates provided are based on data provided by ORNL and the Office of Research at UTK. The estimates contained in the report quantify the income, employment, and sales tax revenue which will be generated by the activities of the SNS and JINS by accounting for the (1) direct impacts, those arising directly from the expenditures for the construction and operation of the facilities; (2) indirect impacts, those arising from the visitors to the facilities and from facility expenditures in Tennessee; and (3) multiplier impacts, those arising from the ripple effects created as new income is spent and respent in the state economy.
Date: December 18, 2002
Creator: Univ of TN, Center for Business Research
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric Industry Restructuring in Ohio: Residential and Low Income Customer Impacts

Description: Throughout the country the long standing administratively based regulatory structure for determining the cost and service parameters for electric utilities is changing. More and more market elements are coming into the structure. There is a push by many players to eliminate much of the current regulation. For the production side of electricity at least, these players argue that a market approach will do a better n job of pricing power and making it available to customers. However, the electricity industry currently has a large base of investment in power production equipment, some of which may have difficulty competing in a market-based system. What to do about this potentially uneconomic existing investment is an important question receiving a great deal of attention at the policy discussion level. Some argue that if the investment in existing facilities is uneconomic in a new market based system, that is too bad for the owners of the above-market cost facilities, and customers should bear no responsibility to help make those owners whole. Others argue that the owners of above-market cost facilities invested in those facilities in good faith and should not be made to bear the cost of a changing underlying industry structure. The arguments on both sides are long and involved, and this paper is not the place to explore them. However, it is clear that the result of the debate is uncertain, and both approaches must be explored. The purpose of this report is to analyze the current electric utility cost structure in Ohio, estimate the expected changes in that structure and cost levels under various restructuring proposals, and determine the likely impact on low income and other residential customers. The report analyzes the likely cost impacts of a variety of approaches to the above-market cost facility problem. The range of potential outcomes ...
Date: March 26, 2001
Creator: Eisenberg, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Community-Owned wind power development: The challenge of applying the European model in the United States, and how states are addressing that challenge

Description: Local farmers, towns, schools, and individual investors are, however, beginning to invest in wind power. With the help of state policy and clean energy fund support, new federal incentives, and creative local wind developers who have devised ownership structures that maximize the value of both state and federal support, community wind power is beginning to take a foothold in parts of the US, in particular the upper Midwest. The purpose of this report is to describe that foothold, as well as the state support that helped to create it. There are a number of reasons why states are becoming increasingly interested in community wind power. In rural Midwestern states such as Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois, community wind is seen as a way to help supplement and stabilize farmer income, and thereby contribute to the preservation of farming communities and the rural landscapes and values they create. In the Northeast, densely populated states such as Massachusetts are turning to community-scale wind development to increase not only the amount of wind power on the grid, but also the public's knowledge, perception, and acceptance of wind power. In still other areas--such as the Pacific Northwest, which is already home to several large wind farms--states are simply responding to strong interest from local constituents who see community wind power as a way to take responsibility for, and mitigate the environmental impact of, electricity generation. But what exactly is ''community wind power''? Definitions vary widely, ranging from behind-the-meter installations to the Danish wind ''cooperatives'' to wind projects owned by municipal utilities. Possible defining criteria include: project size (small vs. large projects); purpose (to offset end-use power consumption vs. to sell power to the grid); ownership (single local vs. multiple local vs. municipal utility vs. commercial owners); and interconnection (behind the meter vs. to the ...
Date: March 28, 2004
Creator: Bolinger, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Use of Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) in Federal Health Programs

Description: This report explores how modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is defined differently across health programs such as Medicare, the health insurance exchanges under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and Medicaid. It also discusses why MAGI is used, and how it is applied, specific to each program. The report covers that MAGI is used to determine (1) penalty amounts owed if a person does not comply with the individual mandate or whether an individual is exempt from the individual mandate; (2) eligibility for and the amount of a premium credit to purchase coverage through a health insurance exchange; and (3) Medicaid income eligibility for certain populations.
Date: February 25, 2016
Creator: Baumrucker, Evelyne P.; Davis, Patricia A.; Fernandez, Bernadette; Mach, Annie L. & Pettit, Carol A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salaries of Members of Congress: Recent Actions and Historical Tables

Description: This report provides historical tables on the rate of pay for Members of Congress since 1789; details on enacted legislation with language prohibiting the automatic annual pay adjustment since the most recent adjustment; the adjustments projected by the Ethics Reform Act as compared with actual adjustments in Member pay; and Member pay in constant and current dollars since 1992.
Date: February 23, 2016
Creator: Brudnick, Ida A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water, energy, and farm production

Description: Electric utility rate deregulation can have disproportionate impacts on water-intensive crops, which have historically relied upon pressurized irrigation technologies and surface water resources. Based on a case study of agricultural growers in southern California, the paper models the impacts of utility rates considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region. The study was performed as part of the 2004 Power Marketing Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The empirical results reflect linear-programming estimates of the income transfers from growers to energy providers based on county-wide coverage of 13 junior and senior irrigation districts and short-run production possibilities of 11 irrigated crops. Transfers of income from growers to energy suppliers occur through their losses in producer surplus.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Ulibarri, C.A.; Seely, H.S.; Willis, D.B. & Anderson, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Socioeconomic effects of DRAFT power marketing options of the Central Valley and Washoe Projects: 2005 regional economic impact analysis using IMPLAN

Description: This report summarizes the methods and conclusions of an economic analysis of the distributional effects of alternative actions that Sierra Nevada could take with its new marketing plan. These alternatives are summarized in the agency`s Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and this study directly supports the findings in the EIS. The study evaluates the potential economic impacts projected to occur across the northern and central California area currently serviced by Sierra Nevada`s customers. A standard input-output estimation approach was used to calculate impacts on regional output, labor income, and employment. The IMPLAN regional economic modeling system was used to develop regional models for the analysis. Individual regional models were developed for the overall area, the San Francisco Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area, the Sacramento Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area, the Redding Metropolitan Statistical Area, and the Bakersfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. The analysis relies on information about the effect of Sierra Nevada`s alternative actions on overall system power costs for the year 2005 developed by RW Beck and Associates (Beck-1996). This information is used as input to the 2005 benchmarked IMPLAN regional economic models. The resulting economic impact estimates are inextricably linked to this input information about changes in system power costs, and the estimates reported here are of similar relative magnitude to those estimates. The potential economic effects of Sierra Nevada`s actions are extremely small in relation to the size of the economies potentially affected, and, although they are calculable, they are not significant and often difficult to separate from random error present in the models.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, D.M.; Godoy-Kain, P.; Gu, A.Y. & Ulibarri, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department