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Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Legislation for Disaster Assistance: Summary Data

Description: This report provides summary information on emergency supplemental appropriations enacted after major disasters since 1989. The report discusses the most recent and costly disasters occurred in the summer of 2005 when Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma made landfall in Gulf Coast states.
Date: August 14, 2008
Creator: Murray, Justin & Lindsay, Bruce R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Evacuation Policy: Issues for Congress

Description: This report discusses federal evacuation policy and analyzes potential lessons learned from the evacuation of individuals from Hurricane Katrina. Several issue areas that might arise concerning potential lawmaking and oversight on evacuation policy are also highlighted.
Date: November 12, 2008
Creator: Lindsay, Bruce R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Liability for Flood Damage Related to Army Corps of Engineers Projects

Description: This report examines selected issues of the federal government's liability depending on the theory of the levee failures, and analyzes legal defenses available to the federal government. The report uses flood damage related to Hurricane Katrina as an illustration of these legal issues regarding federal liability, but the general principles in the analysis would apply to flood damage resulting from any such flood control project.
Date: July 11, 2008
Creator: Brougher, Cynthia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FEMA Disaster Housing and Hurricane Katrina: Overview, Analysis, and Congressional Issues

Description: This report discusses the issues with the housing policies of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), particularly as they relate to the Post-Katrina Act of 2006 and the Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Plan. It includes an overview of the Stafford Act sections 403 and 408 as well as a breakdown of issues for Congress and possible Congressional approaches to address the policies.
Date: August 8, 2008
Creator: McCarthy, Francis X.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

Description: This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S. & Boissonnade, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

Description: Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E. & McArthur, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Evacuation Policy: Issues for Congress

Description: This report discusses federal evacuation policy and analyzes potential lessons learned from the evacuations of individuals in response to the Gulf Coast hurricanes of 2005. It also highlights several issue areas that might arise concerning potential lawmaking and oversight on evacuation policy.
Date: April 29, 2010
Creator: Lindsay, Bruce R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long-Term Predictions of Global Climate Using the Ocean Conveyor

Description: Many have attributed the Great Ocean Conveyor as a major driver of global climate change over millennia as well as a possible explanation for shorter (multidecadal) oscillations. The conveyor is thought to have a cycle time on the order of 1000 years, however recent research has suggested that it is much faster than previously believed (about 100 years). A faster conveyor leads to the possibility of the conveyor's role in even shorter oscillations such as the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The conveyor is primarily density driven. In this study the salty outflow of the Red Sea is used to predict its behavior ten years into the future. A successful model could lead to a long-term prediction (ten years) of El Ninos, Atlantic hurricane season intensity, as well as global temperature and precipitation patterns.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Ray, P. & Wilson, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic andPacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

Description: Previous research has identified links between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and hurricane intensity. We use climate models to study the possible causes of SST changes in Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclogenesis regions. The observed SST increases in these regions range from 0.32 to 0.67 C over the 20th century. The 22 climate models examined here suggest that century-timescale SST changes of this magnitude cannot be explained solely by unforced variability of the climate system, even under conservative assumptions regarding the magnitude of this variability. Model simulations that include external forcing by combined anthropogenic and natural factors are generally capable of replicating observed SST changes in both tropical cyclogenesis regions.
Date: January 31, 2006
Creator: Santer, B.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.; Gleckler, P.J.; Bonfils, C.; Wehner, M.F.; AchutaRao, K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic Window System

Description: Pleotint has embarked on a novel approach with our Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic, SRT™, windows. We are integrating dynamic sunlight control, high insulation values and low solar heat gain together in a high performance window. The Pleotint SRT window is dynamic because it reversibly changes light transmission based on thermochromics activated directly by the heating effect of sunlight. We can achieve a window package with low solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), a low U value and high insulation. At the same time our windows provide good daylighting. Our innovative window design offers architects and building designers the opportunity to choose their desired energy performance, excellent sound reduction, external pane can be self-cleaning, or a resistance to wind load, blasts, bullets or hurricanes. SRT windows would provide energy savings that are estimated at up to 30% over traditional window systems. Glass fabricators will be able to use existing equipment to make the SRT window while adding value and flexibility to the basic design. Glazing installers will have the ability to fit the windows with traditional methods without wires, power supplies and controllers. SRT windows can be retrofit into existing buildings,
Date: October 27, 2006
Creator: Millett, F,A & Byker,H, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Visualization and Modeling Working Group

Description: During the 2005 Hurricane season, many consequence predictions were available from 36 to 96 hours before landfalls, via the Department of Energy’s Visualization and Modeling Working Group (VMWG). Real-time data can be tapped by local officials and utilities, and can also be accessed for post-event regulatory audits. An overview of VMWG’s models, results and uses will be presented.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Fernandez, S. J. & Dodrill, K. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.

Description: Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of such ...
Date: January 20, 2012
Creator: Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Site Annual Meteorology Report for 2004

Description: Summaries of meteorological observations collected at the Savannah River Site in 2004 show a year that was overall cooler and drier than average. Although the annual rainfall of 42.9 inches was the eleventh driest of all the years over a period of record that began in 1952, rainfall was quite variable through the year. September total rainfall of 10.26 inches was the highest in this 53 year record; conversely, the monthly rainfall in March, 0.81 inches, was the lowest on record. Rainfall of 0.01 inch or more occurred on 104 days during the year. The annual average temperature for 2004, 63.4 degrees F, was the eleventh coldest of any year in an available record that dates to 1964. Cooler than average conditions were observed in 9 of the 12 months of the year. The coldest temperature during the year was 20.3 degrees F on the morning of December 15; the warmest observed temperature was 98.2 degrees F on the afternoon of July 14. The most notable weather event of 2004 was an active Atlantic hurricane season that resulted in six named storms striking the Southeast U.S. during August and September. Although each of these storms posed a significant threat to the SRS, their eventual paths resulted in only minimal impacts. The remnants of hurricanes Frances and Jeanne produced 24-hr rainfall totals of 3.99 inches (Sept. 8) and 3.48 inches (Sept. 27), respectively. Surface winds associated with Jeanne resulted in sustained speeds approaching 15 mph with gusts to 35 mph on September 27. An ice storm on January 26 produced an estimated accumulation of one-fourth to one-half inch of ice, resulting in scattered power outages and considerable damage to trees across the Site. A strong cold front moving through the area on March 7 produced a 15-minute average surface wind of ...
Date: March 25, 2005
Creator: CHARLES, HUNTER
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Site Annual Meteorology Report 2003

Description: Summaries of meteorological observations collected at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 2003 reveal a year that was unusually cool and wet. The annual rainfall of 61.2 inches was the third highest of all the years in a period of record that began in 1952. Higher amounts were recorded only in 1964 (73.5 in) and 1971 (68.2 in). Rainfall of 0.01 inch or more occurred on 119 days during the year. Furthermore, the annual average temperature of 62.2 degrees Fahrenheit was the coldest of any year in an available record that dates to 1964. Cool and wet conditions were most pronounced in the spring and summer months. Unusually cold weather also occurred in January and December. The coldest temperature for the year was 12.5 degrees Fahrenheit (Jan 24) and the warmest temperature was 92.4 degrees Fahrenheit (Aug 27). There were no significant occurrences of severe weather (ice/snow, tornado, sustained high wind) during the year. The heavy rain that occurred on April 7 (3.5 inches) was due to an active stationary front over the area and strong southwesterly wind aloft. The remnants of Tropical Storm Bill produced 2.36 inches of rain on July 1. Hurricane Isabelle, which struck the North Carolina coast mid September, did not have a significant affect on the SRS. A thunderstorm on May 3 produced a surface (4-meter) wind gust of 41.7 miles per hour.
Date: April 30, 2004
Creator: HUNTER, CHARLESH.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Full-scale structural testing for severe wind, 1995. Proceedings of the INEL severe windstorm testing workshop

Description: This document provides brief background information and reports the discussions and findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Severe Windstorm Testing Workshop held November 29-30, 1995, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Section 1 presents a historical perspective on wind engineering and testing in the U.S. Section 2 discusses INEL`s and the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) interest in a new testing facility, and the efforts that led to the organization of the work-shop. The workshop discussions are then described in Sections 3 through 8. These sections focus on the interaction of the participants and are not intended to be exhaustive discussion of the subjects. A summary of the findings, along with the INEL`s recommendations, are presented in Section 9. A list of the workshop participants, a glossary, and additional technical information provided by selected participants are included in the Appendices.
Date: May 1996
Creator: O`Brien, C. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Description: This report introduces a $1.1 billion programthat would help restore specified sites in the coastal wetland ecosystem in Louisiana and more extensive restoration options that are being discussed in the wake of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina. It also discusses whether this program, if completed, might have muted the impacts of the hurricanes.
Date: January 24, 2007
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA): Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Implementation

Description: This report discusses the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA), which enacted in 1990 and administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, has funded wetland restoration projects for more than 10 years.
Date: January 24, 2007
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Homeland Security Assistance to States and Localities: A Summary and Issues for the 111th Congress

Description: This report summarizes several emergency management and homeland security programs, and identifies and analyzes potential issues for the 111th Congress. These issues include the purpose and number of assistance programs; the evaluation of the use of grant funding; the determination of eligible grant recipients; the programs' funding amounts; and the programs' funding distribution methodologies.
Date: February 26, 2009
Creator: Reese, Shawn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities

Description: The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G. & Shin, Y.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Evacuation Policy: Issues for Congress

Description: This report discusses federal evacuation policy and analyzes potential lessons learned from the evacuation of individuals from Hurricane Katrina. Several issue areas that might arise concerning potential lawmaking and oversight on evacuation policy are also highlighted. This report will be updated as significant legislative or administrative changes occur.
Date: March 30, 2009
Creator: Lindsay, Bruce R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department