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PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AY102/C106 AND AZ102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER FEED SIMULANTS (U)

Description: The objective of this task is to characterize and report specified physical properties and pH of simulant high level waste (HLW) melter feeds (MF) processed through the scaled melters at Vitreous State Laboratories (VSL). The HLW MF simulants characterized are VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) AY102/C106 precipitated hydroxide processed sludge blended with glass former chemicals at VSL to make melter feed. The physical properties and pH were characterized using the methods stated in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) characterization procedure (Ref. 7).
Date: March 31, 2005
Creator: Hansen, E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Frame work on an on-line regulations expert permit server, Semi-annual technical progress report, September 25, 1996--March 24, 1997

Description: The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission and its member states have become increasingly concerned about environmental compliance costs for the petroleum exploration and production industry with estimated costs for 1990 at about $2 billion. Over the last decade, these costs have increased at a rate of 3 to 5% per year. At a time when regulatory and environmental needs and costs are increasing, major oil companies are restructuring and reducing staffs. The places an increased burden on the remaining personnel charged with regulatory compliance duties. As major oil producers have begun to concentrate on their more profitable overseas properties, they have created a greater role for the approximately 8000 independent oil and gas producers in the U.S. with many being small independent producers with limited staff. With small staffs, the independents lack the infrastructure to address an increasingly important aspect of production operations: compliance with environmental regulations. Depending on the level of industry activity, the oil and gas industry could incur an additional $16 to $24 billion in increased environmental compliance expenditures by the end of the 1990`s. At current oil prices, the abandonment of remaining resources in known oil reservoirs could be accelerated by approximately ten years, and up to 30% of currently producing resources could be immediately abandoned because of increased regulations. Transferring new and innovative technologies to the industry can help defer reservoir abandonments, improve regulatory compliance, lower the costs of compliance, reduce risk, and help assure the development of new domestic resources.
Date: March 24, 1997
Creator: Hansen, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003

Description: The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.
Date: March 27, 2004
Creator: Hansen, Todd
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999

Description: The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.
Date: March 8, 2000
Creator: Hansen, Todd & Levy, Karin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001

Description: The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.
Date: March 15, 2002
Creator: Hansen, Todd & Levy, Karin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006

Description: The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.
Date: March 8, 2007
Creator: Hansen (Ed.), Todd
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal detector study for Hanford

Description: This study was undertaken at the request of the Hanford Works to investigate the possibility of detecting 3/8 inch diameter boron-steel control-balls which become lodged within cracks between the graphite blocks of an atomic pile. The cracks concerned occur radially from 4 3/16 inch diameter holes which pass vertically through the pile. The problem is complicated by the following facts: The graphite blocks are conducting and will therefore give rise to spurious signals primarily due to the cracks between blocks. Numerous aluminum tubes containing water and bars of uranium pass horizontally through the pile at distances closer to the hole than the ball at its extreme position. The vertical holes themselves are warped in an arbitrary manner. Calculations were made to determine theoretically whether or not the ball could be detected. Best operating frequency and coil design were also determined. Tests were made utilizing a specially designed search coil and a test section of graphite pile. Measurements of particle voltage vs. position relative to the coil were made and compared with that resulting from the graphite.
Date: March 25, 1952
Creator: Hansen, W.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004

Description: The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as strategic LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and ...
Date: March 22, 2005
Creator: Hansen, Todd C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Summary Report for Basic Research in Thermionic Energy Conversion: 1 December 1970 to 30 November 1971

Description: Abstract: This report presents some of the results of the past year's work in a continuing study of thermionic converters. It is a study of the basic processes in thermionic diodes, and the application of this basic information to the achievement of practical thermionic energy conversion.
Date: March 1972
Creator: Hansen, Lorin K. & Warner, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monazite Placers on South Muddy Creek, McDowell County and Silver Creek, Burke County, North Carolina

Description: Introduction: During the winter of 1951-52 the Bureau of Mines, upon the recommendation of the Geological Survey, conducted a churn drill exploration program on monazite placer deposits in the flood plains of several streams in Cleveland and Rutherford Counties in southwestern North Carolina.
Date: March 1954
Creator: Hansen, Leland A. & White, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure as a probe of the glassy state of ferroelectrics with random site disorder

Description: Results on lanthanum-modified lead zirconate-titanates (PLZTs) have revealed a pressure-induced crossover from a normal ferroelectric to a relaxor state and the continuous evolution of the dynamics and energetics of the relaxation process. This crossover appears to be a general feature of soft mode ferroelectrics with random site dipolar impurities or polar nanodomains and results from a large decrease in the correlation radius among polar nanodomains -- a unique property of soft mode ferroelectrics.
Date: March 10, 1998
Creator: Samara, G.A. & Hansen, L.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical and mechanical properties of degraded waste surrogate material

Description: This paper discusses rock mechanics testing of surrogate materials to provide failure criteria for compacted, degraded nuclear waste. This daunting proposition was approached by first assembling all known parameters such as the initial waste inventory and rock mechanics response of the underground setting after the waste is stored. Conservative assumptions allowing for extensive degradation processes helped quantify the lowest possible strength conditions of the future state of the waste. In the larger conceptual setting, computations involve degraded waste behavior in transient pressure gradients as gas exits the waste horizon into a wellbore. Therefore, a defensible evaluation of tensile strength is paramount for successful analyses and intentionally provided maximal failed volumes. The very conservative approach assumes rampant degradation to define waste surrogate composition. Specimens prepared from derivative degradation product were consolidated into simple geometries for rock mechanics testing. Tensile strength thus derived helped convince a skeptical peer review panel that drilling into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would not likely expel appreciable solids via the drill string.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Hansen, F.D. & Mellegard, K.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Making NEPA more effective and economical for the new millennium

Description: This paper focuses on a ten-element strategy for streamlining the NEPA process in order to achieve the Act's objectives while easing the considerable burden on agencies, the public, and the judicial system. In other words, this paper proposes a strategy for making NEPA work better and cost less. How these ten elements are timed and implemented is critical to any successful streamlining. The strategy elements discussed in this paper, in no particular order of priority, are as follows: (1) integrate the NEPA process with other environmental compliance and review procedures; (2) accelerate the decision time for determining the appropriate level of NEPA documentation; (3) conduct early and thorough internal EIS (or EA) scoping before public scoping or other public participation begins; (4) organize and implement public scoping processes that are more participatory than confrontational; (5) maintain an up-to-date compendium of environmental baseline information; (6) prepare more comprehensive, broad-scope umbrella EISs that can be used effectively for tiering; (7) encourage preparation of annotated outlines with detailed guidance that serve as a road map for preparation of each EIS or EA; (8) decrease the length and complexity of highly technical portions of NEPA documents; (9) increase and systematize NEPA compliance outreach, training, and organizational support; and (10) work diligently to influence the preparation of better organized, shorter, and more readable NEPA documents.
Date: March 8, 2000
Creator: HANSEN,ROGER P. & WOLFF,THEODORE A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

Description: High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than ...
Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: Eibling, R; Erich Hansen, E & Bradley Pickenheim, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and development of the vacuum systems for the APT project ED & D cryomodule

Description: The mechanical design for both the insulating vacuum system and the cavity vacuum system of the APT ED and D Cryomodule is summarized. The pre-cooldown pressure limits for the insulating vacuum and the cavity vacuum are 10{sup {minus}5} Torr and 10{sup {minus}6} Torr, respectively. In addition, the cold cavity operating pressure limits are 10{sup {minus}6} Torr for the insulating system and 10{sup {minus}8} Torr for the cavity system. The designs of these systems utilize both turbomolecular pumps and the cold surfaces of the superconducting Nb cavities to arrive at and maintain their operating vacuum pressures. A synopsis of the analysis undertaken to predict the vacuum system performance is also presented.
Date: March 25, 1999
Creator: Hansen, G; Kishiyama, K; Shen, S & Shoaff, P V
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department