570 Matching Results

Search Results

Deuteron photodisintegration : new results from TJNAF.

Description: The first measurements of the differential cross section from d({gamma},p)n up to 4.0 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF, formerly CEBAF). Bremsstrahlung photons from electron beam impinging on a copper radiator and a liquid deuterium target were employed for this experiment. The experiment was performed in Hall C where the photoprotons at forward angles in the center-of-mass were detected in the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) and photoprotons at backward angles were detected in the Short Orbit Spectrometer (SOS). The bremsstrahlung photon energy was reconstructed from the measured proton momentum and angle using the two-body kinematics. We report the cross section results at the proton center-of-mass angles of 37{degree} and 90{degree}. These results are in good agreement with previous lower energy measurements. The 90{degree} data continue to show the constituent-counting-rule behavior up to 4 GeV. The results will be compared with models based on QCD as well as those based on meson-exchange theory.
Date: November 18, 1997
Creator: Abbott, D. J.; Ahmidouch, A.; Armstrong, C. S.; Arrington, J.; Cummings, W. J.; Geesaman, D. F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quasifree (e,e'p) Reactions and Proton Propagation in Nuclei

Description: The (e,e'p) reaction was studies on targets of C, Fe, and Au at momentum transfers squared Q{sup 2} of 0.6, 1.3, 1.8 and 3.3 GeV{sup 2} in a region of kinematics dominated by quasifree electron-proton scattering. Missing energy and missing momentum distributions are reasonably well described by plane wave impulse approximation calculations with Q{sup 2} and A dependent corrections that measure the attenuation of the final state protons.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Abbott, David; Ahmidouch, A.; Amatuni, Ts.A.; Armstrong, C.; Arrington, J.; Assamagan, J.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of the elasticity of Ta at high temperature and pressure

Description: The thermodynamic and transport properties of crystals and fluids at high temperature and pressure play a central role in the Earth and planetary sciences as well as in a variety of technologies and constitute a principal probe into the internuclear potential energy function at high density. Observation of surface waves by coherent time-domain optical spectroscopy provides an experimental approach to the determination, in the diamond-anvil high-pressure cell, of the elastic constants and thermal diffusivity of metal crystals as well as the equation of state and thermal transport properties of fluids. The electrical resistivities of metals may also be approximately accessible via the Wiedemann Franz Law. Preliminary results on Ta to pressures of 5.2 GPa are reported here. [Ta, elasticity, sound velocity, thermal diffusivity, equation of state].
Date: August 26, 1998
Creator: Abramson, E H; Brown, J M; Hansen, D W; Ruddle, C M; Slutsky, L J & Zaug, J M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design, construction, and operation of a laboratory scale reactorfor the production of high-purity, isotopically enriched bulksilicon

Description: The design and operation of a recirculating flow reactor designed to convert isotopically enriched silane to polycrystalline Si with high efficiency and chemical purity is described. The starting material is SiF{sub 4}, which is enriched in the desired isotope by a centrifuge method and subsequently converted to silane. In the reactor, the silane is decomposed to silicon on the surface of a graphite starter rod (3 mm diameter) heated to 700-750 C. Flow and gas composition (0.3-0.5% silane in hydrogen) are chosen to minimize the generation of particles by homogeneous nucleation of silane and to attain uniform deposition along the length of the rod. Growth rates are 5 {micro}m/min, and the conversion efficiency is greater than 95%. A typical run produces 35 gm of polycrystalline Si deposited along a 150 mm length of the rod. After removal of the starter rod, dislocation-free single crystals are formed by the floating zone method. Crystals enriched in all 3 stable isotopes of Si have been made: {sup 28}Si (99.92%), {sup 29}Si (91.37%), and {sup 30}Si (88.25%). Concentrations of electrically active impurities (P and B) are as low as mid-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Concentrations of C and O lie below 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, respectively.
Date: December 20, 2004
Creator: Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Hansen, W.L. & Haller, E.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-purity, isotopically enriched bulk silicon

Description: The synthesis and characterization of dislocation-free, undoped, single crystals of Si enriched in all 3 stable isotopes is reported: {sup 28}Si (99.92%), {sup 29}Si (91.37%), and {sup 30}Si (89.8%). A silane-based process compatible with the relatively small amounts of isotopically enriched precursors that are practically available was used. The silane is decomposed to silicon on a graphite starter rod heated to 700-750 C in a recirculating flow reactor. A typical run produces 35 gm of polycrystalline Si at a growth rates of 5 {micro}m/min and conversion efficiency >95%. Single crystals are grown by the floating zone method and characterized by electrical and optical measurements. Concentrations of shallow dopants (P and B) are as low as mid-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Concentrations of C and O lie below 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, respectively.
Date: November 17, 2004
Creator: Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Sharp, I.D.; Liao, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large-scale dynamic compaction demonstration using WIPP salt: Fielding and preliminary results

Description: Reconsolidation of crushed rock salt is a phenomenon of great interest to programs studying isolation of hazardous materials in natural salt geologic settings. Of particular interest is the potential for disaggregated salt to be restored to nearly an impermeable state. For example, reconsolidated crushed salt is proposed as a major shaft seal component for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project. The concept for a permanent shaft seal component of the WIPP repository is to densely compact crushed salt in the four shafts; an effective seal will then be developed as the surrounding salt creeps into the shafts, further consolidating the crushed salt. Fundamental information on placement density and permeability is required to ensure attainment of the design function. The work reported here is the first large-scale compaction demonstration to provide information on initial salt properties applicable to design, construction, and performance expectations. The shaft seals must function for 10,000 years. Over this period a crushed salt mass will become less permeable as it is compressed by creep closure of salt surrounding the shaft. These facts preclude the possibility of conducting a full-scale, real-time field test. Because permanent seals taking advantage of salt reconsolidation have never been constructed, performance measurements have not been made on an appropriately large scale. An understanding of potential construction methods, achievable initial density and permeability, and performance of reconsolidated salt over time is required for seal design and performance assessment. This report discusses fielding and operations of a nearly full-scale dynamic compaction of mine-run WIPP salt, and presents preliminary density and in situ (in place) gas permeability results.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Ahrens, E.H. & Hansen, F.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature sensitivity of Cu K(alpha) imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal

Description: The Vulcan laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory was used to study the interaction of a 75 J 10 ps, high intensity laser beam with low-mass solid, Cu targets. Two instruments were fielded as diagnostics of the Cu K-shell emission from the targets: A single photon counting CCD spectrometer provided the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield and a spherically bent Bragg crystal recorded 2D monochromatic images with a spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m. Due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} spectral lines with increasing temperature, there is a temperature dependence of the crystal collection efficiency. This provides a temperature diagnostic when cross calibrated against a single hit CCD spectrometer, and it affects measurements of the spatial pattern of electron transport. The experimental data showing changing collection efficiency are presented. The results are discussed in light of modeling of the temperature-dependent spectrum of Cu K-shell emission.
Date: August 7, 2006
Creator: Akli, K U; Key, M H; Chung, H K; Hansen, S B; Freeman, R R; Chen, M H et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser heating of solid matter by light pressure-driven shocks

Description: Heating by irradiation of a solid surface in vacuum with 5 x 10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}, 0.8 ps, 1.05 {micro}m wavelength laser light is studied by x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from thin layers of Ni, Mo and V. A surface layer is heated to {approx} 5 keV with an axial temperature gradient of 0.6 {micro}m scale length. Images of Ni Ly{sub {alpha}} show the hot region has a {approx} 25 {micro}m diameter, much smaller than {approx} 70 {micro}m region of K{sub {alpha}} emission. 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations suggest that the surface heating is due to a light pressure driven shock.
Date: May 4, 2007
Creator: Akli, K; Hansen, S B; Kemp, A J; Freeman, R R; Beg, F N; Clark, D et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beach and Borrow Site Sediment Investigation for a Beach Nourishment at Ocean City, Maryland

Description: Report describing the methodology used to sample and analyze sediment at Ocean City, Maryland as part of a beach nourishment project. During the project, sediment was moved from borrow sites to construct parts of the beach area; both the borrow sites and native beach were tested.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Anders, Fred J. & Hansen, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

Description: The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply ...
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Hall, Derek B.; Hansen, Dennis J. & Ostler, William K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

Description: The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply ...
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Hall, Derek B.; Hansen, Dennis J. & Ostler, William K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary for Policy Makers: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report Renewable Energy Sources (SRREN)

Description: The Working Group III Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) presents an assessment of the literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of the contribution of six renewable energy (RE) sources to the mitigation of climate change. It is intended to provide policy relevant information to governments, intergovernmental processes and other interested parties. This Summary for Policymakers provides an overview of the SRREN, summarizing the essential findings. The SRREN consists of 11 chapters. Chapter 1 sets the context for RE and climate change; Chapters 2 through 7 provide information on six RE technologies, and Chapters 8 through 11 address integrative issues.
Date: May 8, 2011
Creator: Arvizu, Dan; Bruckner, Thomas; Christensen, John; Devernay, Jean-Michel; Faaij , Andre; Fischedick, Manfred et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country

Description: This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.
Date: October 9, 2012
Creator: Bailey, Brent & Hansen, Evan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D-Zero muon readout electronics design

Description: The readout electronics designed for the D{null} Muon Upgrade are described. These electronics serve three detector subsystems and one trigger system. The front-ends and readout hardware are synchronized by means of timing signals broadcast from the D{null} Trigger Framework. The front-end electronics have continuously running digitizers and two levels of buffering resulting in nearly deadtimeless operation. The raw data is corrected and formatted by 16- bit fixed point DSP processors. These processors also perform control of the data buffering. The data transfer from the front-end electronics located on the detector platform is performed by serial links running at 160 Mbit/s. The design and test results of the subsystem readout electronics and system interface are discussed.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Baldin, B.; Hansen, S.; Los, S.; Matveev, M. & Vaniev, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

Description: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps {at} 100 {micro}s for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials` achievement of these purposes.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A. & Hansen, N.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department