Search Results

Gloves

Description: Pair of gloves of white cotton. The daytime gloves are wrist length, with 3 tucks at top along back of hand, and a 1/2" fold-over band at wrist hem.
Date: 1950~
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Mitts

Description: Pair of ivory cotton or silk mitts. The elbow-length fingerless gloves are of crocheted ivory material in the style of the 1860's. The long sleeves have bands of lacework patterning. The hands are fingerless, with cording between where fingers would go, and an oval opening for the thumb.
Date: 186u
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Mitts

Description: Pair of black cotton lace mitts. The wrist-length fingerless gloves are of hand-crocheted lace, in a wide mesh. Slight frill at wrist, and separate thumb. A narrow black ribbon is threaded through the cuff, one ribbon lacking.
Date: [1850..1867]
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Mitts

Description: Pair of off-white nylon mitts. The elbow-length fingerless gloves have a loop for the thumb, and are embellished along the finger opening with a trim of openwork daisy heads. Stamped: "Nylasuede / by Hansen / 6 1/2"
Date: 1965~
Creator: Hansen Glove Corporation
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Gloves

Description: Pair of gloves of white cotton. The plain, daytime gloves are wrist-length. Retailer's label sewn inside: "Made in Western Germany / expressly for / Neiman-Marcus / 100% Cotton"
Date: 1950~
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Gloves

Description: Pair of gloves of tan suede. The wrist-length gloves are plain, with hand-stitching. Size/Designer Label stamped inside: "7 / Made in France / by / Roger Fare" Retailer Label: "Neiman-Marcus / Made in France"
Date: 1955~
Creator: Fare, Roger
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Caustic Leaching of SRS Tank 12H Sludge With and Without Chelating Agents

Description: The primary objective of this study was to measure the effect of adding triethanolamine (TEA) to caustic leaching solutions to improve the solubility of aluminum in actual tank-waste sludge. High-level radioactive waste sludge that had a high aluminum assay was used for the tests. This waste, which originated with the processing of aluminum-clad/aluminum-alloy fuels, generates high levels of heat because of the high {sup 90}Sr concentration and contains hard-to-dissolve boehmite phases. In concept, a chelating agent, such as TEA, can both improve the dissolution rate and increase the concentration in the liquid phase. For this reason, TEA could also increase the solubility of other sludge components that are potentially problematic to downstream processing. Tests were conducted to determine if this were the case. Because of its relatively high vapor pressure, process design should include methods to minimize losses of the TEA. Sludge was retrieved from tank 12H at the Savannah River Site by on-site personnel, and then shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the study. The sludge contained a small quantity of rocky debris. One slate-like flat piece, which had approximate dimensions of 1 1/4 x 1/2 x 1/8 in., was recovered. Additional gravel-like fragments with approximate diameters ranging from 1/8 to 1/4 in. were also recovered by sieving the sludge slurry through a 1.4-mm square-pitch stainless steel mesh. These particles ranged from a yellow quartz-like material to grey-colored gravel. Of the 32.50 g of sludge received, the mass of the debris was only 0.89 g, and the finely divided sludge comprised {approx}97% of the mass. The sludge was successfully subdivided into uniform aliquots during hot-cell operations. Analytical measurements confirmed the uniformity of the samples. The smaller sludge samples were then used as needed for leaching experiments conducted in a glove box. Six tests were performed with leachate concentrations ...
Date: April 30, 2003
Creator: Spencer, B.B.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light transmission and air used for inspection of glovebox gloves.

Description: Various materials used for manufacturing the glovebox gloves are translucent material such as hypalon, rubbers, and neoprene. This means that visible light can be transmitted through the inside of the material. Performing this test can help to increase visualization of the integrity of the glove. Certain flaws such as pockmarks, foreign material, pinholes, and scratches could be detected with increased accuracy. An analysis was conducted of the glovebox gloves obscure polymer material using a inspection light table. The fixture is equipped with a central light supply and small air pump to inflate the glove and test for leak and stability. A glove is affixed to the fixture for 360-degree inspection. Certain inspection processes can be performed: (1) Inspection for pockmarks and thin areas within the gloves; (2) Observation of foreign material within the polymer matrix; and (3) Measurements could be taken for gloves thickness using light measurements. This process could help reduce eyestrain when examining gloves and making a judgment call on the size of material thickness in some critical areas. Critical areas are fingertips and crotch of fingers.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Castro, J. M. (Julio M.); Steckle, W. P. (Warren P.), Jr. & Macdonald, J. M. (John M.)
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

Description: As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR EFFECTIVE PERMEATION CONTROL

Description: A research and development task was undertaken to determine the permeabilities of hydrogen and dry air through different polymeric glove materials that are used to maintain the integrity of glovebox secondary containment. Fifteen different glove samples were obtained from four different manufacturers and samples cut from these gloves were tested. The gloves included baseline butyl rubber, Viton{reg_sign}, Dupont{reg_sign} Hypalon{reg_sign}, polyurethane, as well as composite gloves. The testing indicated that all of the vendor's butyl rubber gloves and the Jung Viton{reg_sign} gloves performed comparably in both gases.
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dexterity test data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

Description: Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (T A-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Using an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program. A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management who own glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (hereafter referred to as gloves), the weakest component of this safety-significant system, would perform best in these aggressive environments. As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) were the primary glove for programmatic operations at TA55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduce the amount of mixed transuranic waste. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In this report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and the pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Cournoyer, Michael E; Lawton, Cindy M; Castro, Amanda M; Costigan, Stephen A & Schreiber, Stephen
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dexterity tests data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

Description: Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alphaemitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces and airborne contamination and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Through an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGJP). A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management owning glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (the weakest component of this safety significant system) would perform in these aggressive environments. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) glovebox gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) had been the workhorse of programmatic operations at TA-55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduced the amount of mixed TRU waste. This effort contributes to Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In the following report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded glovebox gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.
Date: January 1, 2008
Creator: Cournoyer, Michael E; Lawton, Cindy M & Castro, Amanda M
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

Description: A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P. & Chapman, G.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR

Description: Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough ...
Date: August 3, 2011
Creator: Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M. & Reeves, G.
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

Description: An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P. & Chapman, G.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Puncture evaluation of radiological gloves to assess use performance

Description: Tensile testing of gloves is an accepted method for the qualification of a new glove material or the qualification of a production run. Most often these tests are performed in accordance to ASTM standards, i.e. - D412-98a Standard Test Methods (STM) for Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers-Tension, Unfortunately for elastomers such protocols do not exist for puncture testing. There are however several test methods for the puncture resistance of Protective Clothing [F1342-91(1996)e2], Barrier FiIms and Laminates[F1306-90(1998)], and Coated Fabrics [D751-001]. Each of these standards uses different probe geometries and testing rates. Initial testing of the gloves has been performed using the standard one inch ball burst fixture as supplied by Instron. Samples tested using this fixture usually did not burst within the travel of the test fixture, except for lead lined hypalon. Three fixtures were fabricated in accordance to the aforementioned ASTM standards. Results for these fixtures for several materials will be reported along with the observed rate dependence.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Steckle, W. P. (Warren P.), Jr.; Mittelstet, R. P.; Castro, J. M. (Julio M.) & Smith, M. E. (Mark E.)
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PLUTONIUM HANDLING AND CONTROL PRACTICES AT PACIFIC NORTHWEST LABORATORY

Description: One of two major facilities used for plutonium fuels research and development studies at Battelle-Northwest is the Plutonium Fuels Laboratory (PFL). This facility was specifically designed and equipped for research and development studies involving multikilogram quantities of plutonium and its mixtures, compounds, and alloys. As at other sites, the design and operation philosophy of the PFL is one of complete plutonium containment. Primary plutonium containment is provided by glove boxes, secondary containment is provided by individual laboratories, and tertiary containment is supplied by the building proper. Air samples, taken throughout the facility, are constantly being monitored for free contamination. Personnel exposure caused by X, gamma, and neutron radiation has been primarily omitted by inspiring good work habits and housekeeping practices in personnel (i.e., uncontrolled accumulations of plutonium are avoided, plutonium is confined as much as possible, exposure times are limited, and shielding equipment is used whenever necessary). Rules for the prevention of an inadvertent criticality in the PFL are based upon the criteria that at least two control conditions must fail before criticality is imminent.
Date: October 1, 1966
Creator: Gulley, RL
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Project Plan 7930 Cell G PaR Remote Handling System Replacement

Description: For over 40 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have made Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) available for a wide range of industries including medical, nuclear fuels, mining, military and national security. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) located within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) processes irradiated production targets from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operations in Building 7930, Cell G provide over 70% of the world's demand for {sup 252}Cf. Building 7930 was constructed and equipped in the mid-1960s. Current operations for {sup 252}Cf processing in Building 7930, Cell G require use of through-the-wall manipulators and the PaR Remote Handling System. Maintenance and repairs for the manipulators is readily accomplished by removal of the manipulator and relocation to a repair shop where hands-on work can be performed in glove boxes. Contamination inside cell G does not currently allow manned entry and no provisions were created for a maintenance area inside the cell. There has been no maintenance of the PaR system or upgrades, leaving operations vulnerable should the system have a catastrophic failure. The Cell G PaR system is currently being operated in a run to failure mode. As the manipulator is now 40+ years old there is significant risk in this method of operation. In 2006 an assessment was completed that resulted in recommendations for replacing the manipulator operator control and power centers which are used to control and power the PaR manipulator in Cell G. In mid-2008 the chain for the bridge drive failed and subsequent examinations indicated several damaged links (see Figure 1). To continue operations the PaR manipulator arm is being used to push and pull the bridge as a workaround. A retrieval tool was fabricated, tested and staged inside Cell G that will allow positioning of the bridge and manipulator ...
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Kinney, Kathryn A
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of Reducing Groundwater on the Retardation of Redox-Sensitive Radionuclides

Description: Laboratory batch sorption experiments were used to investigate variations in the retardation behavior of redox-sensitive radionuclides. Water-rock compositions used during these experiments were designed to simulate subsurface conditions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), where a suite of radionuclides were deposited as a result of underground nuclear testing. Experimental redox conditions were controlled by varying the oxygen content inside an enclosed glove box and by adding reductants into the testing solutions. Under atmospheric (oxidizing) conditions, the radionuclide distribution coefficients varied with the mineralogical composition of the sorbent and the water chemistry. Under reducing conditions, distribution coefficients showed marked increases for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 237}Np in devitrified tuff, but much smaller variations in alluvium, carbonate rock, and zeolitic tuff. This effect was particularly important for {sup 99}Tc, which tends to be mobile under oxidizing conditions. Unlike other redox-sensitive radionuclides, iodine sorption may decrease under reducing conditions when I{sup -} is the predominant species. Overall, sorption of U to alluvium, devitrified tuff, and zeolitic tuff under atmospheric conditions was less than in the glove-box tests. However, the mildly reducing conditions achieved here were not likely to result in substantial U(VI) reduction to U(IV). Sorption of Pu was not affected by the decreasing redox conditions achieved in this study, as the predominant sorbed Pu species in all conditions was expected to be the low-solubility and strongly sorbing Pu(OH){sub 4}. Depending on the aquifer lithology, the occurrence of reducing conditions along a groundwater flowpath could potentially contribute to the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides {sup 99}Tc and {sup 237}Np, which are commonly identified as long-term dose contributors in the risk assessment in various nuclear facilities.
Date: April 21, 2008
Creator: Hu, Q; Zavarin, M & Rose, T P
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VALIDATION OF HANFORD PERSONNEL AND EXTREMITY DOSIMETERS IN PLUTONIUM ENVIRONMENTS

Description: A study was performed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant to assess the performance of Hanford personnel neutron dosimetry. The study was assessed whole body dosimetry and extremity dosimetry performance. For both parts of the study, the TEPC was used as the principle instrument for characterizing workplace neutron fields. In the whole body study, 12.7-cm-diameter TEPCs were used in ten different locations in the facility. TLD and TED personnel dosimeters were exposed on a water-filled phantom to enable a comparison of TEPC and dosimeter response. In the extremity study, 1.27-cm-diameter TEPCs were exposed inside the fingers of a gloveboxe glove. Extremity dosimeters were wrapped around the TEPCs. The glove was then exposed to six different cans of plutonium, simulating the exposure that a worker's fingers would receive in a glovebox. The comparison of TEPC-measured neutron dose equivalent to TLD-measured gamma dose equivalent provided neutron-to-gamma ratios that can be used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent received by a worker's finger based on the gamma readings of an extremity dosimeter. The study also utilized a Snoopy and detectors based on bubble technology for assessing neutron exposures, providing a comparison of the effectiveness of these instruments for workplace monitoring. The study concludes that the TLD component of the HCND performs adequately overall, with a positive bias of 30%, but exhibits excessive variability in individual results due to instabilities in the algorithm. The TED response was less variable but only 20% of the TEPC reference dose on average because of the low neutron energies involved. The neutron response of the HSD was more variable than the TLD component of the HCND and biased high by a factor of 8 overall due to its calibration to unmoderated 252Cf. The study recommends further work to correct instabilities in the HCND algorithm and to explore the potential ...
Date: February 10, 2000
Creator: Scherpelz, Robert I.; Fix, John J. & Rathbone, Bruce A.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

Description: A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.
Date: May 14, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GAS PRESSURE IN 3013 CONTAINERS USING AN ISP DATABASE QUERY

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) is responsible for the storage and surveillance of plutonium-bearing material. During storage, plutonium-bearing material has the potential to generate hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of adsorbed water. The generation of hydrogen gas is a safety concern, especially when a container is breached within a glove box during destructive evaluation. To address this issue, the DOE established a standard (DOE, 2004) that sets the criteria for the stabilization and packaging of material for up to 50 years. The DOE has now packaged most of its excess plutonium for long-term storage in compliance with this standard. As part of this process, it is desirable to know within reasonable certainty the total maximum pressure of hydrogen and other gases within the 3013 container if safety issues and compliance with the DOE standards are to be attained. The principal goal of this investigation is to document the method and query used to estimate total (i.e. hydrogen and other gases) gas pressure within a 3013 container based on the material properties and estimated moisture content contained in the ISP database. Initial attempts to estimate hydrogen gas pressure in 3013 containers was based on G-values (hydrogen gas generation per energy input) derived from small scale samples. These maximum G-values were used to calculate worst case pressures based on container material weight, assay, wattage, moisture content, container age, and container volume. This paper documents a revised hydrogen pressure calculation that incorporates new surveillance results and includes a component for gases other than hydrogen. The calculation is produced by executing a query of the ISP database. An example of manual mathematical computations from the pressure equation is compared and evaluated with results from the query. Based on the destructive evaluation of 17 containers, the estimated mean absolute pressure was ...
Date: July 31, 2008
Creator: Friday, G; L. G. Peppers, L & D. K. Veirs, D
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THERMOGRAVIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

Description: An experimental project was initiated to characterize mass loss when heating different polymer glovebox glove material samples to three elevated temperatures, 90, 120, and 150 C. Samples from ten different polymeric gloves that are being considered for use in the tritium gloveboxes were tested. The intent of the study was to determine the amount of material lost. These data will be used in a subsequent study to characterize the composition of the material lost. One goal of the study was to determine which glove composition would least affect the glovebox atmosphere stripper system. Samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The most mass loss was experienced by Jung butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} at 146 C with 12.9% mass loss followed by Piercan Hypalon{reg_sign} at 144 C with 11.4 % mass loss and Jung butyl-Viton{reg_sign} at 140 C with 5.2% mass loss. The least mass loss was experienced by the Jung Viton{reg_sign} and the Piercan polyurethane. Unlike the permeation testing (1) the vendor and fabrication route influences the amount of gaseous species that is evolved. Additional testing to characterize these products is recommended. Savannah River Site (SRS) has many gloveboxes deployed in the Tritium Facility. These gloveboxes are used to protect the workers and to ensure a suitable environment in which to handle tritium gas products. The gas atmosphere in the gloveboxes is purified using a stripper system. The process gas strippers collect molecules that may have hydrogen or its isotopes attached, e.g., waters of hydration, acids, etc. Recently, sulfur containing compounds were detected in the stripper system and the presence of these compounds accelerates the stripper system's aging process. This accelerated aging requires the strippers to ...
Date: February 29, 2012
Creator: Korinko, P.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dried plutonium nitrate decontamination using HNO{sub 3} or Freon 113

Description: A request was made of the Separations Technology Laboratory to perform tests to determine the relative effectiveness of Freon 113 and 18% (3.15M) nitric acid on removing dried plutonium nitrate from Hypalon{reg_sign} gloves destined for use in F B-Line. Freon 113 was very inefficient for removing dried plutonium nitrate under conditions of moderate agitation of the liquid in contact with the dried compound. Nitric acid proved to be an excellent agent for decontaminating purposes for both the gloves and for the Pyrex glass. In tests conducted on the glass or on the gloves on which dried plutonium nitrate had not been removed by Freon 113, followup with nitric acid efficiently removed the residual plutonium nitrate. Tests were also conducted to give some measure of the resistance of the Hypalon glove to continuous contact with 18% HNO{sub 3} or with Freon 113. Following two weeks` immersion, there was little physical difference noted from the starting material, except the glove piece immersed in the Freon underwent an 8% weight gain.
Date: February 4, 1988
Creator: Holcomb, H. P.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department