101 Matching Results

Search Results

Multilingual Information Access for Digital Libraries - The Metadata Records Translation Project

Description: This presentation was given as an invited talk to faculty and students at Wuhan University, Beijing Normal University, Nankai University, and the Library of Chinese Academy of Sciences. The presentation discusses research on multilingual information access for digital libraries and the Metadata Records Translation (MRT) Project.
Date: 2011
Creator: Chen, Jiangping
Partner: UNT College of Information

Resource and Resource Sharing in Intelligent Information Access

Description: This presentation discusses an exploratory study on resources and resource sharing among researchers in Intelligent Information Access (IIA). The investigation consists of two stages. In Stage One, the authors conducted a content analysis to identify resources used in 145 research papers and reports in two subfields of IIA; and in Stage Two, the authors carried out an online survey of IIA researchers to understand resource-sharing channels and the researchers' perspectives on resource sharing.
Date: October 23, 2008
Creator: Chen, Jiangping
Partner: UNT College of Information

Open Access and Scholarly Communication: The Current Landscape, Future Direction, and the Influence on Global Scholarship

Description: Paper for the 2011 ASIS&T Annual Meeting. This paper discusses open access and scholarly communication and the current landscape, future direction, and the influence on global scholarship.
Date: October 2011
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw; Hastings, Samantha Kelly; Hawamdeh, Suliman M.; McLean, Austin & Rorissa, Abebe
Partner: UNT Libraries

Quality Health Information on the Internet: Developing a Diabetes Pathfinder for the Chinese Population

Description: A Web-based bilingual diabetes information pathfinder was created to help the Chinese population access quality health information on the Internet as part of a collaborative outreach project in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Cleveland, Ana D.; Philbrick, Jodi; Pan, Xuequn (Della); Yu, Xinyu; Chen, Jiangping; O'Neill, Marty et al.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Anchor Nodes Placement for Effective Passive Localization

Description: Wireless sensor networks are composed of sensor nodes, which can monitor an environment and observe events of interest. These networks are applied in various fields including but not limited to environmental, industrial and habitat monitoring. In many applications, the exact location of the sensor nodes is unknown after deployment. Localization is a process used to find sensor node's positional coordinates, which is vital information. The localization is generally assisted by anchor nodes that are also sensor nodes but with known locations. Anchor nodes generally are expensive and need to be optimally placed for effective localization. Passive localization is one of the localization techniques where the sensor nodes silently listen to the global events like thunder sounds, seismic waves, lighting, etc. According to previous studies, the ideal location to place anchor nodes was on the perimeter of the sensor network. This may not be the case in passive localization, since the function of anchor nodes here is different than the anchor nodes used in other localization systems. I do extensive studies on positioning anchor nodes for effective localization. Several simulations are run in dense and sparse networks for proper positioning of anchor nodes. I show that, for effective passive localization, the optimal placement of the anchor nodes is at the center of the network in such a way that no three anchor nodes share linearity. The more the non-linearity, the better the localization. The localization for our network design proves better when I place anchor nodes at right angles.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Pasupathy, Karthikeyan
Partner: UNT Libraries

University of North Texas President's Annual Report, 2008

Description: Annual report for the University of North Texas (UNT) includes an overview of research, programs of study, and accomplishments of university departments as well as statistical breakdowns of enrollment, fiscal expenditures, and other operational information.
Date: 2009
Creator: University of North Texas. Division of University Relations, Communications and Marketing.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

A Study of the Competencies Needed of Entry-level Academic Health Sciences Librarians

Description: The purpose of this study was to identify the professional and personal competencies that entry-level academic health sciences librarians should possess from the perspectives of academic health sciences library directors, library and information sciences (LIS) educators who specialize in educating health sciences librarians, and individuals who serve as both LIS adjunct faculty and practitioners in the field of health sciences librarianship. the first six research questions focused on the identification of professional and personal competencies, and the last two research questions focused on comparing and contrasting the three perspectives on the professional and personal competencies. the eight research questions were addressed through four rounds of the Delphi method. Three panels of experts, initially composed of 13 academic health sciences library directors, 8 LIS educators, and 8 LIS adjunct faculty adjunct faculty/health sciences librarianship practitioners, participated in the study, and most participants were female, white, in the age range of 45-64, had less than 20 years of experience in their respective careers, and were members of the Medical Library Association. the data collected from the rounds of the Delphi method were analyzed using descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, and non-parametric statistics, including the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Two major conclusions that can be drawn from the findings of the study are: (1) personal competencies are as important as professional competencies and (2) the professional and personal competencies developed by the LIS educators who specialize in health sciences librarianship education were preferred over the ones developed by the academic health sciences library directors and LIS adjunct faculty/health sciences librarianship practitioners. Experts in the field of health sciences librarianship have created a comprehensive inventory of both professional (knowledge and skill) competencies and personal (self-concept, trait, and motive) competencies that can be used in professional practice as well as educational planning.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Philbrick, Jodi Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries