Search Results

General Satisfaction of Students in 100% Online Courses in the Department of Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are significant relationships between the general satisfaction of students and learner-content interaction, learner-instructor interaction, learner-learner interaction, and learner-technology interaction in 100% online courses. There were 310 responses from the students. This study did not use data from duplicate students and instructors. Excel was used to find duplicate students and instructors; therefore, 128 responses were deleted. After examination of box plots, an additional four cases were removed because they were outliers on seven or more variables. Nineteen responses were deleted because they did not answer all questions of interest, resulting in a total sample of 159 students. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the four independent variables and the dependent variable. In addition to tests for statistical significance, practical significance was evaluated with the multiple R2 , which reported the common variance between independent variables and dependent variable. The two variables of learner-content and learner-instructor interaction play a significant role in predicting online satisfaction. Minimally, the variable learner-technology can predict online satisfaction and is an important construct that must be considered when offering online courses. Results of this study provide help in establishing a valid and reliable survey instrument and in developing an online best learning environment, as well as recommendations for institutions offering online learning or considering the development of online learning courses.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Ahn, Byungmun
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Subject of Learning and Performance

Description: This editorial article discusses the inaugural issue of the Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) open access journal. This editorial offers a welcome and introduction to the first issue.
Date: 2012
Creator: Pasquini, Laura A. & Allen, Jeff M.
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT College of Information

Analyzing Patterns Within Academic and Legal Definitions: a Qualitative Content Analysis of the Term "Cyberbullying"

Description: Regardless of culture or nation, students today are experiencing bullying via technology. With the rise of technology, this abuse has the ability to become more far-reaching, and more pervasive than ever. These students face oppression, and in some cases severe imbalances of power. Current research is being conducted and laws created based on varying operational and conception definitions of the term "cyberbullying." This study aims to analyze and provide a coherent definition for the term "cyberbullying" as it is used in research and legislation, especially in the context of today's educational environments. The results help shed light on the large variances in the term and suggestions are made to clarify the definition as the field continues to move forward.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Winn, Matthew R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Testing the Psychometric Properties of the Online Student Connectedness Survey

Description: The Online Student Connectedness Survey (OSCS) was introduced to the academic community in 2012 as an instrument designed to measure feelings of connectedness between students participating in online degree and certification programs. The purpose of this study was to examine data from the instrument for initial evidence of validity and reliability and to establish a nomological network between the OSCS and similar instruments utilized in the field. The study utilized sequential exploratory factor analysis- confirmatory factor analysis (EFA-CFA) and correlational analysis to assess results of the data. Students enrolled in online courses at higher education institutions located in the United States served as the sample for this study. Three instruments were used during the study. The OSCS was administered first so that the factor structure could be examined for factor validity. Once confirmed, the Classroom Community Scale (CCS) and the Community of Inquiry Scale (COI) served as the instruments to examine nomological validity through correlational analysis of data.This study provided evidence of factor validity and reliability for data from the OSCS. After the initial EFA-CFA, the four-factor structure held, and 16 of the 25 original items remained for nomological testing. Statistically significant correlations were demonstrated between factors contained in the OSCS, CCS, and COI, providing further evidence of construct validity. These results indicate that for the sample used in this study, the OSCS provides data that are valid and reliable for assessing feelings of connection between participants in online courses at institutions of higher learning.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Zimmerman, Tekeisha
Partner: UNT Libraries

Call Number, Volume 71, Number 1, Spring 2012

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: Spring 2012
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Call Number, Volume 71, Number 1, Spring 2012

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: Spring 2012
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Call Number, Volume 70, Number 2, Fall 2011

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: Autumn 2011
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Call Number, Volume 70, Number 2, Fall 2011

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: Autumn 2011
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Call Number, Volume 67, Number 2, Fall 2008

Description: Call Number, is the newsletter of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and alumni.
Date: 2008
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

The Implementation of a Confidence-based Assessment Tool Within an Aviation Training Program

Description: Traditional use of the multiple-choice question rewards a student for guessing. This technique encourages rote memorization of questions to pass a lengthy exam, and does not promote comprehensive understanding or subject correlation. This begs the question; do we really want question memorizers to operate the machinery of our industrialized society? In an effort to identify guessing on answers during an exam within a safety-critical aviation pilot training course, a qualitative research study was undertaken that introduced a confidence-based element to the end-of-ground-school exam followed by flight simulator sessions. The research goals were twofold, to clearly identify correct guesses and also provide an evidence-based snapshot of aircraft systems knowledge to be used as a formative study aid for the remainder of the course. Pilot and instructor interviews were conducted to gather perceptions and opinions about the effectiveness of the confidence-based assessment tool. The finding of overall positive interview comments confirmed that the pilots and flight instructors successfully used the confidence-based assessments as intended to identify weak knowledge areas and as aids, or plans, for their remaining study time. The study found that if properly trained and administered—especially through a computer-based medium—a robust confidence-based assessment tool would be minimally-burdensome while offering worthwhile benefits.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Novacek, Paul F.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Student characteristics and self-concept of secondary career and technical education students in a north central Texas region

Description: Self-concept, discussed as a scholarly topic since the time of Socrates and Plato, is an important theoretical construct in education because self-concept is considered to be a desirable trait and a facilitator of positive future behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the characteristics of students enrolled in career and technical education (CTE) programs and students' self-concept scores as measured by specific subscales from the Self-Description Questionnaire (SDQ). A total of 196 male and 89 female secondary students (Grades 9-12) enrolled in arts, audio/video technology and communications cluster courses in North Central Texas school districts participated in the study. Student characteristic variables of interest were age, gender, CTE program enrollment, and participation in CTE. The self-concept subscales analyzed were General, Academic, Verbal, Math, and Problem Solving. A canonical correlation analysis was conducted using the four student characteristic variables as predictors of the five self-concept variables to evaluate the multivariate shared relationship between the two variable sets. The full model across all functions explained about 23% of the variance between the variable sets. Function 1 explained 15% of the shared variance and Function 2 explained 7% of the variance that remained. This study detected a relationship between specific student characteristics and self-concept as measured on certain domain-specific first-order factors. Gender and participation in CTE were found to be related to verbal self-concept and problem-solving self-concept. Results suggest that females in arts-based CTE programs have a higher verbal self-concept than their male counterparts; male students have a higher problem-solving self-concept. Results further suggest that students with a high level of participation in CTE also have high verbal and problem-solving self-concepts.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Cox, Nancy Lynne
Partner: UNT Libraries

Lone Star Ink: Texas NDNP 2011: Grant Materials

Description: These grant materials were prepared for the National Digital Newspaper Program, a project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to provide access to historic American Newspapers. The Library of Congress serves as the technical adviser for the NDNP. The Award funded digitization of Texas historical newspapers. For the grant, UNT served as the lead institution and partnered with the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas. This proposal was funded for $324,980.
Date: January 2011
Creator: Krahmer, Ana; Belden, Dreanna & Hartman, Cathy Nelson
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Call Number, Volume 69, Number 2, Fall 2010

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: 2010
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Examining the Relationship Between Individual and Work Environment Characteristics and Learning Transfer Factors

Description: To impact student learning, educators’ implementation, or transfer, of new knowledge, skills, dispositions, and practices to daily work is the primary purpose of professional learning. The purpose of this study was to assess the multivariate relationship between individual and work environment characteristics as measured by the Collective Efficacy Scale and Dimensions of Learning Organization Questionnaire, respectively, and learning transfer factors as measured by the Learning Transfer System Inventory. The sample consisted of 249 PK-12 grade school- based instructional staff members of an education association. Canonical correlation and commonality analyses required using the two individual and work environment characteristics of learning culture and collective efficacy as predictor variables of the five learning transfer factors of performance self-efficacy, transfer-effort performance expectations, performance outcome expectations, performance coaching, and resistance to change to evaluate the multivariate between the two variable sets. Learning culture and collective efficacy demonstrated a relationship to resistance to change and performance outcome expectations. Learning culture and collective efficacy were insufficient to transfer-effort performance expectations, attend to performance self-efficacy beliefs, and increase support for transfer (i.e., performance coaching) factors. These findings might guide the decisions and practice of individuals with responsibility to plan, implement, and evaluate professional learning, and provide the conditions necessary for changing educational practice while increasing support for and building educators’ confidence about implementation. Further research may confirm the findings and enhance generalizability.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Kennedy, Jacqueline E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Call Number, Volume 69, Number 1, Spring 2010

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: 2010
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Call Number, Volume 68, Number 1, Spring 2009

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: 2009
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Call Number, Volume 68, Number 2, Fall 2009

Description: Call Number "is the twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information" (p. 2) at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and alumni.
Date: 2009
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

The assumption of a reliable instrument and other pitfalls to avoid when considering the reliability of data

Description: This article helps researchers avoid common pitfalls associated with reliability including incorrectly assuming that measurement error always attenuates observed score correlations, different sources of measurement error originate from the same source, and reliability is a function of instrumentation.
Date: April 12, 2012
Creator: Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda Reichwein & Henson, Robin K.
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Call Number, Volume 70, Number 1, Spring 2011

Description: Call Number is a twice yearly (spring and fall) magazine of the College of Information at the University of North Texas. The periodical contains information about professors, news in the departments, and the school's alumni.
Date: 2011
Creator: University of North Texas. College of Information.
Partner: UNT College of Information

Value and Pricing of MOOCs

Description: This article reviews the potential for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) to transform higher education delivery, accessibility, and costs.
Date: May 27, 2016
Creator: Baker, Rose M. & Passmore, David L.
Item Type: Article
Partner: UNT College of Information

A Study of Student's Perceptions of Blended Learning Environments at a State-Supported Postsecondary Institution

Description: The purpose of this study was to conduct exploratory research regarding students' perceptions of blended learning environments at a state supported postsecondary institution. Specifically investigated were students' overall perceptions of blended learning environments, the reasons they chose to take a blended course, and whether generational differences existed in students' affected perceptions. An electronic survey was distributed to students enrolled in blended learning courses at the end of the spring 2009 term.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Shaw, Joanna G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

2D and 3D Fabrication Devices: Can They Improve Spatial Reasoning Skills in Children?

Description: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefit of two hours of activities involving 2D and 3D fabricators on the spatial reasoning skills of children in Grades 4 and 5, ages 9 to 10, from a private school in Southeast Texas. Can the introduction to hands-on activities with products created with these devices and learning about how these devices operate improve spatial reasoning skills? The research also evaluates the use of the Shapes Test as a valid measure of the spatial reasoning skills of children. The Cube Design and Spatial Memory subtests of the UNIT (Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Tests) were used for evaluating the spatial reasoning skills of the participants, based on their respected validity, along with a Shapes Test that is in development. Discussion regarding gender, language, and experiential theories of spatial reasoning skill development are included in the literature review.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Zimmerman, Ellen L
Partner: UNT Libraries

Mobile Learning: Factors That Influence University Students’ Intention to Use Smartphones

Description: This study investigated the factors that influence university students’ intention to use a smartphone. The study proposed and validated a research model based on the technology acceptance model (TAM). The TAM was modified and extended with four new constructs: social norms, perceived enjoyment, perceived value and ease of access. The constructs for the instrument of the study were adapted from previous related studies which had validated the instruments. Data were collected from 110 participants via a survey. The collected data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple-regression using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS version 22.0). The model demonstrated a good fit where six independent variables together contributed 56.2% of the variance to the outcome or prediction. The results of the analysis were used to test a set of research hypotheses and to answer research questions. The following independent variables were found to be significant in determining university students’ intention to use mobile devices: perceived usefulness, social norms, perceived enjoyment, perceived value and ease of access. The control variables gender and degree level and the independent variable ease of use were not significant predictors. The results of this study may be useful to understand which factors are more important to the students. This understanding can be utilized by the University administrators for developing policies related to mobile learning and by the IT departments for planning organizational technology services.
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Date: December 2015
Creator: Hossain, Akhlaq
Partner: UNT Libraries