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Oral History Interview with Estelle Adams, July 5, 2014

Description: Interview with Estelle Adams discussing her life growing up in Wheelock, Texas as well as her grandparents who left Georgia and other extended family members. She also talks about her experiences teaching in various Texas towns, including a segregated school in Bryan, Texas and being transferred to a school in Dallas, Texas during integration.
Date: July 5, 2014
Creator: Smith, Tiffany & Adams, Estelle Mitchell
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

[News Script: Negro march]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about the Goodwill Crusade Youth and Adult Council, Inc.of Dallas marching through the North Dallas area.
Date: February 27, 1960
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: MLK parade VOSOT]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 6 P.M.
Date: January 18, 1997
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Rosa Parks Plaza]

Description: B-roll footage from the NBC 5 television station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story about Rosa Parks Plaza. This story aired at 5 P.M.
Date: June 29, 2009
Creator: NBC 5 (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Rosa Parks Plaza]

Description: B-roll footage from the NBC 5 television station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story about Rosa Parks Plaza. This story aired at 4 P.M.
Date: June 29, 2009
Creator: NBC 5 (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Civil Rights Restoration Act: Bibliography-in-Brief, 1984-1988

Description: This bibliography includes references to magazine articles, monographs, and congressional documents which discuss civil rights legislation following 1984 Supreme Court decision in Grove City v. Bell which ruled title IX applies only to the specific program receiving federal financial assistance.
Date: April 29, 1988
Creator: Dove, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Space Race: African American Newspapers Respond to Sputnik and Apollo 11

Description: Using African American newspapers, this study examines the consensual opinion of articles and editorials regarding two events associated with the space race. One event is the Soviet launch of Sputnik on October 4, 1957. The second is the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Space Race investigates how two scientific accomplishments achieved during the Cold War and the civil rights movement stimulated debate within the newspapers, and that ultimately centered around two questions: why the Soviets were successful in launching a satellite before the US, and what benefits could come from landing on the moon. Anti-intellectualism, inferior public schools, and a lack of commitment on the part of the US government are arguments offered for analysis by black writers in the two years studied. This topic involves the social conditions of African Americans living within the United States during an era when major civil rights objectives were achieved. Also included are considerations of how living in a "space age" contributed to thoughts about civil rights, as African Americans were now living during a period in which science fiction was becoming reality. In addition, this thesis examines how two scientific accomplishments achieved during this time affected ideas about education, science, and living conditions in the U.S. that were debated by black writers and editors, and subsequently circulated for readers to ponder and debate. This paper argues that black newspapers viewed Sputnik as constituting evidence for an inferior US public school system, contrasted with the Soviet system. Due to segregation between the races and anti-intellectual antecedents in America, black newspapers believed that African Americans were an "untapped resource" that could aid in the Cold War if their brains were utilized. The Apollo moon landing was greeted with enthusiasm because of the universal wonder at landing on the moon itself and ...
Date: December 2007
Creator: Thompson, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Original Guitar Hero and the Power of Music: the Legendary Lonnie Johnson, Music, and Civil Rights

Description: Lonnie Johnson (1894–1970) was a virtuoso guitarist who influenced generations of musicians from Django Reinhardt to Eric Clapton to Bill Wyman and especially B. B. King. Born in New Orleans, he began playing violin and guitar in his father’s band at an early age. When most of his family was wiped out by the 1918 flu epidemic, he and his surviving brother moved to St. Louis, where he won a blues contest that included a recording contract. His career was launched. Johnson can be heard on many Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong records, including the latter’s famous “Savoy Blues” with the Hot Five. He is perhaps best known for his 12-string guitar solos and his ground-breaking recordings with the white guitarist Eddie Lang in the late 1920s. After World War II he began playing rhythm and blues and continued to record and tour until his death. This is the first full-length work on Johnson. Dean Alger answers many biographical mysteries, including how many members of Johnson’s large family were left after the epidemic. He also places Johnson and his musical contemporaries in the context of American race relations and argues for the importance of music in the fight for civil rights. Finally, Alger analyzes Johnson’s major recordings in terms of technique and style. Distribution of an accompanying music CD will be coordinated with the release of this book.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: April 2014
Creator: Alger, Dean
Partner: UNT Press