174 Matching Results

Search Results

Solubility and Reaction Rates of Aluminum Solid Phases Under Geothermal Conditions

Description: Experimental studies involving equilibrium solubility and dissolution/precipitation rates were initiated on aluminum hydroxide phases prevalent under geothermal reservoir conditions. A large capacity, hydrogen-electrode concentration cell (HECC) was constructed specifically for this purpose.
Date: May 28, 2000
Creator: Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J. & Anovitz, L.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Power Factor Study Reduces Energy Costs at Aluminum Extrusion Plant: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Aluminum Technical Case Study

Description: This case study is the latest in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. The case studies document the activities, savings, and lessons learned on these projects.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corporate Energy Conservation Program for Alcoa North American Extrusions: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Aluminum BestPractices Management Case Study

Description: This case study is the latest in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. The case studies document the activities, savings, and lessons learned on these projects.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aluminum: Reducing chloride emissions from aluminum production

Description: Reynolds Metals Company (RMC), with assistance from a NICE{sup 3} grant, is developing for commercialization a closed-loop control process that greatly reduces chlorine emissions and increases plant efficiency while maintaining metal quality. The process still utilizes chlorine to remove impurities during aluminum processing, but is more effective than current methods. With the new technology chlorine in the stack is monitored and input chlorine is adjusted continuously. This optimization of chlorine use results in substantially less waste because less chlorine has to be bought or produced by aluminum manufacturers. This innovation is a significant improvement over conventional aluminum treatments, in which chlorine is injected in a more costly and wasteful manner. By the year 2010, the new technology has the potential to reduce the energy it takes to create chlorine by 8.4 billion Btu per year and to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 1,377 tons per year.
Date: September 29, 1999
Creator: Simon, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The OIT Times Newsletter -- Spring 2000, Vol. 3, No. 2

Description: The Spring 2000 issue of OIT [Office of Industrial Technologies] Times features articles on a new ``Best Practices'' team that is facilitating motor systems and heating equipment roadmaps; combined heat and power (CHP) industry international symposium and signing compact agreement ceremony; DOE Secretary Richardson signs compact with the petroleum industry; a major steel showcase is planned for May and OIT customers speak out with what works and what doesn't.
Date: April 4, 2000
Creator: Sousa, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a composite-reinforced aluminum conductor

Description: Fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new composite-reinforced aluminum conductor for utility transmission and distribution. The millions of people affected by a blackout in the western US, Canada, and parts of Mexico in July 1996 had no idea the power outage was caused by overloaded transmission lines sagging low enough to touch trees. Millions of New Englanders affected by power outages during the 1997--98 winter probably weren't aware that accumulations of ice and snow on transmission lines had caused the lines to snap. Yet, these two examples illustrate the urgent need to begin upgrading this country's aging electrical-power distribution systems. A key step in this process lies in improving the weight and conductivity characteristics of utility transmission and distribution lines. Conventional conductors used for overhead transmission and distribution lines are comprised of aluminum strands of wire wrapped around a steel core. The aluminum serves as the electrical conductor, while the steel provides mechanical support. This hybrid design results in an excellent weight-to-conductivity ratio, but it also yields a heavier product, which requires stronger and more costly support structures and limits conductivity. W. Brandt Goldsworthy and Associates, Inc., of Torrance, California, is developing a new composite-reinforced aluminum conductor to replace aging steel-core lines. The new composite conductor is lighter, stronger, and carries a higher current capacity than traditional power lines. The technology has been designed primarily for domestic utility transmission and distribution systems. This application takes the highest priority as utility deregulation continues to increase the demand for direct-power access. Subsequent applications exist through opportunities in the industrial power, building wire, telecommunications and data transmission, and high-temperature superconductor markets. Similar applications overseas also represent tremendous potential, with growth projected at 10 times that of the United States market.
Date: November 11, 1999
Creator: Balsam, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Turning industry visions into reality: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Technology Partnerships brochure

Description: The Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) is helping industry identify and pursue technology needs through public-private sector partnerships. Through its Industries of the Future strategy, OIT encourages energy-intensive industries to work together to create broad, industry-wide goals for the future, identify specific needs and priorities through industry-led roadmaps and form cooperative alliances to help attain those goals through technology partnerships. This brochure and six inserts serve as an introduction to potential partners as well as an update on the program opportunities for current partners.
Date: February 9, 1999
Creator: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OIT Times--Summer 2000, Vol. 3, No. 3 (Newsletter)

Description: This issue of OIT [Office of Industrial Technologies] Times features steps being taken to streamline the R and D proposal solicitation process and includes an updated solicitation schedule. There is an article describing The Pittsburgh Regional Technology Showcase event launched by DOE Assistant Secretary Dan Reicher.
Date: June 14, 2000
Creator: Austin, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IAC Energy Assessment of Spanish Fork Plant: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Aluminum BestPractices Assessment Case Study

Description: This case study is the latest in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. The case studies document the activities, savings, and lessons learned on these projects.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aluminum: Reflective Aluminum Chips

Description: This fact sheet reveals how the use of reflective aluminum chips on rooftops cuts down significantly on heat absorption, thus decreasing the need for air conditioning. The benefits, including energy savings that could reach the equivalent of 1.3 million barrels of oil annually for approximately 100,000 warehouses, are substantial.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Recca, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF FUSED UO$sub 2$

Description: The density and purity of fused UO/sub 2/ from several suppliers was evaluated. Densities of large pieces varied widely, but variations in pycnometer and bulk densities of crushed UO/sub 2/ powder were small. Average oxygen- touranium ratios ranged from 1.94 to 2.14. Impurities visible as microscopic inclusions were U/sub 4/O/sub 9/, metallic uranium, UC, and UN/sub 2/. The chief trace metallic contaminants were aluminum, iron, and silicon. Hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide were evolved during vacuum extraction. (auth)
Date: April 1, 1963
Creator: Cole, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MAXIMUM MISSILE RANGES FROM CASED EXPLOSIVE CHARGES

Description: Curves are calculated and plotted to show maximum missile ranges from TNT changes cased with aluminum or steel of various thicknesses. The maxfmum initial missile velocity is assumed to be 10,000 fps. General trajectory formulas are derived from which the range may be calculated for any initial missile velocity, as determined from the ratio of the case weight to the explosive weight. (auth)
Date: July 1, 1958
Creator: Bishop, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ACCURATE MICROMETER FOR CORROSION SAMPLES

Description: A micrometer that utilizes eddy current techniques is described. The gage is capable of measuring nominal 0.5000-in. aluminum rods to an accuracy of plus or minus 0.00005 in., and is unaffected by residual nonconductive surface filins such as oxides or corrosion products. (auth)
Date: June 1, 1960
Creator: Woodward, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE HYDROLYSIS PRODUCTS OF TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE PROCESS FOR URANIUM RECOVERY

Description: A study was made of the stability of tributyl phosphate (TBP) to acids, bases, and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/su)/sub 2/ solutions, and of the chemistry of its decomposition products. The effect of such decomposition products on the extraction behavior of ion of MBP and lines the RAW analyzer and a subsequent reduction of feed flow rate in each case resulted in immediate reduction in losses, as evidenced by the polarographic results. In many such instances, several hours of operation at high waste losses were avoided. A dropping mercury electrode was used for stream analysis, and the RAW solution was analyzed directiy without either dilution or addition of supporting eleclrolyte. Removal of dissolved oxygen and control of temperature were urnecessary. The precision of the method was better than plus or minus 5%, and the accuracy, which is dependent on calibration with a standard solution, was well within the precision value. The calibration curve is linear, for practical purposes, up to approximately 8 g/l UNH or 0.032 lb/gal uranium. (auth)
Date: April 15, 1951
Creator: Wagner, R.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANNUAL SUMMARY RESEARCH REPORT IN CHEMISTRY, JULY 1, 1959-JUNE 30, 1960

Description: Pilot-plant work on ion exchange separation of rare earths indicates that elution with HEDTA on hydrogen-form resin should conserve Sc. Then, after Sc, Lu, Yb, Tm, and Er are diverted to an auxiliary bed, the remaining rare earths can be resolved with EDTA. Data from investigations of rare-earth glycolate solubilities at 20 and 60 deg C are tabulated. In other work, the effectiveness of glycolic acid for fractionally precipitating rare earths was investigated, and the solubilities and composition rare-earth nitrilotriacetates were studied. Data on preparation of Y are given and information on physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of rare-earths is presented. Corrosion of Zr- Sc alloys in high temperature water was studied and data on the physical properties of rare-earth salts obtained during the report period are given. Preliminary results on the mass spectra of group IV-B and V-B elements are presented. Synthetic methods for preparing highly pure VOCl/sub 3/ and VOF/sub 3/ are reported. Results of studies on the fragmentation of N/sup 29/ molecule indicate that more /sup 15/N/sup +/ ions than /sup 14/N/sup +/ are produced by electron bombardment at 45 to 100 volts. A wet chemical procedure for N in metals and alloys by isotope dilution with an average precision of plus or minus 5% is reported. A study in which oxygen isotopes are quantitatively released by KBrF/sub 4/ from inorganic compounds snd determined by isotopic dilution is described. Results of investigations of oxygen isotopes in boron minerals found in the Kramer Ore Body at various levels are tabulated. Methods for isotopic assay of C and N, O and N, Si and O, and B and O in compounds are discribed. Research on the cohesion in polyatomic many-electron systems and on the nature of chemicals is reported from which it is concluded that the chemical bond owes ...
Date: September 1, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department