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Acoustical Imaging and Mechanical Properties of Soft Rock and Marine Sediments Progress Report: January-March 2002

Description: Three major goals were accomplished during this phase. First, a study was completed of the effects of stress-induced changes in anisotropic elastic moduli in sandstone. Second, a new method for measuring the anisotropic poroelastic moduli from acoustic data was developed. Third, a series of triaxial experiments were conducted on unconsolidated sands to identify pressure/stress conditions where liquefaction occurs under high confining pressures. Stress-induced changes in anisotropic Young's moduli and shear moduli were observed during deformational pathway experiments. A new method was made for the acquisition of compressional and shear wave velocities along a series of 3-dimensional raypaths through a core sample as it is subjected to deformation. Three different deformational pathway experiments were conducted. During the hydrostatic deformation experiment, little or no anisotropy was observed in either the Young's moduli or shear moduli. Significant deformational anisotropies were observed in both moduli during the uniaxial strain test and the triaxial compression experiment but each had a different nature. During the triaxial experiment the axial and lateral Young's moduli and shear moduli continued to diverge as load was applied. During the uniaxial strain experiment the anisotropy was ''locked in'' early in the loading phase but then remained steady as both the confining pressure and axial stress were applied. A new method for measuring anisotropic Biot's effective stress parameters has also been developed. The method involves measuring the compressional and shear wave velocities in the aforementioned acoustic velocity experiments while varying stress paths. For a stress-induced transversely isotropic medium the acoustic velocity data are utilized to calculate the five independent elastic stiffness components. Once the elastic stiffness components are determined these can be used to calculate the anisotropic Biot's effective stress parameters, {alpha}{sub v} and {alpha}{sub h}, using the equations of Abousleiman et al. (1996). A series of experiments have been conducted, on …
Date: April 30, 2002
Creator: Scott Thurman E., Jr.; Abousleiman, Younane & Zaman, Musharraf
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Stripper Gas Produced Water Remediation, Quarterly Technical Report: July-September 2002

Description: Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal …
Date: October 2002
Creator: Bonner, Harry & Malmquist, Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf San Andres Reservoir. Quarterly Progress Report: January 1--March 31, 2002

Description: The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.
Date: January 17, 2003
Creator: Hickman, T. Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: July-September 2002

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 July to 30 September 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Nakamura, T.; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CO2 Selective Ceramic Membrane for Water-Gas-Shift Reaction With Concomitant Recovery of CO2, Quarterly Report: September - December 2002

Description: In this quarter, we have made progress in the three approaches selected for preparing CO{sub 2}-affinity membrane. A defect free nanoporous membrane was prepared via slip casting. This membrane will then be used for post treatment to seal the micropores to become a non-porous membrane with CO{sub 2} affinity. This post treatment study will be our focus in the next several quarters. Polymeric gel as a precursor was successfully prepared, which will be used for subsequent thin film deposition. Preparation of a defect-free thin film from this precursor will be our future focus using the sol-gel approach. Finally, the third approach, in-situ impregnation approach, was modified. Although we were able to deposit the precursor within the porous of the membrane, we have not been able to enhance the pH in-situ. Designing an unconventional approach to alternate the pH in-situ will be our focus of the next quarter.
Date: March 14, 2003
Creator: Liu, Paul K. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs, Quarterly Report: July 1 - September 30, 2002

Description: Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging …
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Paulsson, Bjorn N. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers Quarterly Progress Report: January-March 2002

Description: This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. A series of field tests for RRI at the Ameren Sioux Unit No.1 have demonstrated that RRI can provide up to 30% NOx reduction over the use of over fire air in large scale (480MW) cyclone fired utility boilers. The field tests and modeling results are in good agreement. Final data analysis has been completed for tests performed at Eastlake Power Station of a real-time waterwall corrosion monitoring system. The tests demonstrated that corrosion could be measured accurately in real-time in normal boiler operations, and an assessment of waterwall wastage could be made without impacting boiler availability. Detailed measurements of soot volume fraction have been performed for a coal burner in a pilot scale test furnace. The measured values are in good agreement with the expected trends for soot generation and destruction. Catalysts from four commercial manufacturers have been ordered and one of the samples was received this quarter. Several in situ analyses of vanadium-based SCR catalyst systems were completed at BYU. Results to date indicate that the system produces results that represent improvements compared to literature examples of similar experiments. Construction of the catalyst characterization system (CCS) reactor is nearly complete, with a few remaining details discussed in this report. A literature review originally commissioned from other parties is being updated and will be made available under separate cover as part of this investigation. Fabrication of the …
Date: April 30, 2002
Creator: Bockelie, Mike; Cremer, Marc; Davis, Kevin; Senior, Connie; Hurt, Bob; Eddings, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Stripper Gas Produced Water Remediation, Quarterly Technical Report: April-June 2002

Description: Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal …
Date: July 2002
Creator: Bonner, Harry & Malmquist, Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Stripper Gas Produced Water Remediation, Quarterly Technical Report: October-December 2002

Description: Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominately water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal …
Date: January 2003
Creator: Bonner, Harry & Malmquist, Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers Quarterly Progress Report: October-December 2002

Description: This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NO{sub x} control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, progress was made on the computational simulation of a full-scale boiler with the purpose of understanding the potential impacts of burner operating conditions on soot and NO{sub x} generation. Sulfation tests on both the titania support and vanadia/titania catalysts were completed using BYU's in situ spectroscopy reactor this quarter. These experiments focus on the extent to which vanadia and titania sulfate in an SO{sub 2}-laden, moist environment. Construction of the CCS reactor system is essentially complete and the control hardware and software are largely in place. A large batch of vanadia/titania catalyst in powder form has been prepared for use in poisoning tests. During this quarter, minor modifications were made to the multi-catalyst slipstream reactor and to the control system. The slipstream reactor was installed at AEP's Rockport plant at the end of November 2002. In this report, we describe the reactor system, particularly the control system, which was created by REI specifically for the reactor, as well as the installation at Rockport.
Date: January 30, 2003
Creator: Bockelie, Mike; Cremer, Marc; Davis, Kevin; Linjewile, Temi; Senior, Connie; Shim, Hong-Shig et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: April-June 2002

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Nakamura, T.; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Wireless Mine Wide Telecommunication Technology, Quarterly Report: July - September 2002

Description: Work is being done to transmit data via our through-the-earth communications system. After evaluating several methods, quadrature phase shift keying was selected as the preferred method. Coding was added to voice communication to increase reliability when two-way radios are being used as input and output devices. For in-mine communication, we are studying to increase the versatility of our system through the addition of Ethernet ports.
Date: October 2002
Creator: Meiksin, Zvi H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Alternative Fuels and Chemicals From Synthesis Gas Technical Progress Report: Number 30

Description: The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.
Date: March 31, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Early Entrance Co-Production Plant - Decentralized Gasification Cogeneration Transportation Fuels and Steam From Available Feedstocks, Quarterly Report: July - September 2002

Description: Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.
Date: January 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: October - December 2002

Description: The first quarter of the Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications was characterized by the evaluation and determination of the specifications required for the development of the system for permanent applications in wellbores to the optimization of hydrocarbon production. The system will monitor and transmit in real time pressure and temperature information from downhole using the production tubing as the medium for the transmission of the acoustic waves carrying digital information. The most common casing and tubing sizes were determined by interfacing with the major oil companies to obtain information related to their wells. The conceptual design was created for both the wireless gauge section of the tool as well as the power generation module. All hardware for the wireless gauge will be placed in an atmospheric pressure chamber located on the outside of a production tubing with 11.4 centimeter (4-1/2 inch) diameter. This mounting technique will reduce cost as well as the diameter and length of the tool and increase the reliability of the system. The power generator will use piezoelectric wafers to generate electricity based on the flow of hydrocarbons through an area in the wellbore where the tool will be deployed. The goal of the project is to create 1 Watt of power continuously.
Date: March 24, 2003
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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24-Channel Geophone Array for Horizontal or Vertical Boreholes Quarterly Technical Report: July-September 2002

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Stripper Gas Produced Water Remediation, Quarterly Technical Report: January-March 2002

Description: Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal …
Date: April 2002
Creator: Bonner, Harry & Malmquist, Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers Quarterly Progress Report: April-June 2002

Description: This is the eighth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. CFD modeling studies of RRI in a full scale utility boiler have been performed that provide further insight into the NOx reduction process that occurs if the furnace is not adequately staged. In situ reactivity data indicate thus far that titania sulfates under SCR conditions but there is no indication of vanadia sulfation in agreement with some, but not most literature results. Additional analysis and advanced diagnostics are under way to confirm this result and determine its accuracy. Construction of a catalyst characterization reactor system is nearly complete, with a few remaining details discussed in this report. Shakedown testing of the SCR field reactor was completed at the University of Utah pilot-scale coal furnace. The CEM system has been ordered. Talks continued with American Electric Power about hosting a demonstration at their Rockport plant.
Date: July 28, 2002
Creator: Bockelie, Mike; Cremer, Marc; Davis, Kevin; Senior, Connie; Hurt, Bob; Eddings, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing Quarterly Technical Progress Report: January-April 2002

Description: Work continued on three major tasks of this project--increasing the circumferential strength of MA956 tubing, joining of the MA956 alloy, and determination of the high temperature corrosion limits of the MA956 alloy. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, all of the cold working operations (0, 10, 20, 30, 40%) and annealing treatments (1000, 1150, 1300 C) have been completed. The sample microstructures produced by this processing continue to be analyzed with TEM results providing valuable information on the strengthening mechanism of this alloy. Creep testing to determine the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy continues. Regarding joining of the MA956 alloy, additional welds were produced with the friction welding and transient liquid phase bonding techniques. And finally, laboratory high temperature corrosion testing of the material continues in both fluid-side and fire-side simulated environments.
Date: April 1, 2002
Creator: Harper, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Co-Firing Coal: Feedlot and Litter Biomass Fuels Quarterly Progress Report #10: September - December 2002

Description: It has been observed from the review that very limited experimental study has been conducted on using FB as re-burn fuel and there exists no model using FB as re-burn fuel. The objective of the current research is to develop a simplified numerical model for NOx reduction process with FB volatiles as the re-burn fuel and compare results with experimental data. In order to satisfy the objective, the proposed work has been divided into 4 tasks. (1) Modeling the combustion process involving the main fuel, ammonia mixture in the main burner. (2) Developing of a simple mixing model of main gases with reburn jet. (3) Selection of a suitable overall global mechanism of reactions for the re-burn fuels, coupling the reaction model with the mixing model and thereby developing the complete re-burn model. (4) Comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained from TAMU combustion facility.
Date: 2003~
Creator: Annamalai, Kalyan; Sweeten, John; Mukhtar, Saqib; Priyadarsan, Soyuz & Thangamani, Arunvel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers Quarterly Progress Report: July-September 2002

Description: This is the ninth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. Various subsystems of BYU's Catalyst Characterization System (CCS) were upgraded this quarter. Work on the CCS hardware and software will continue in the coming quarter. A preliminary test matrix of poisoning experiments in the CCS has been drafted that will explore the effects of at least three poisons: sodium, potassium and calcium. During this quarter, we attempted to resolve discrepancies in previous in situ measurements of catalyst sulfation. Modifications were made to the XPS analysis procedure that allowed analyses of uncrushed samples. Although the XPS and FTIR results are now more consistent in that both indicate that the surface is sulfating (unlike the results reported last quarter), they disagree with respect to which species sulfates. The CEM system for the multi-catalyst slipstream reactor arrived this quarter. Minor modifications to the reactor and control system were completed. The reactor will be shipped to AEP Rockport plant next quarter for shakedown and installation. In a parallel effort, we have proposed to make mercury oxidation measurements across the catalysts at the start of the field test. Pending approval from DOE, we will begin the mercury measurements next quarter.
Date: October 24, 2002
Creator: Bockelie, Mike; Cremer, Marc; Davis, Kevin; Senior, Connie; Hurt, Bob; Eddings, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Oxygen Enhanced Combustion for NOx Control, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: October1 - December 31, 2002

Description: This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the eleventh quarter, October-December 2002, in the following task areas: Task 1 - Oxygen Enhanced Combustion, Task 2 - Oxygen Transport Membranes, Task 3 - Economic Evaluation and Task 4 - Program Management. The program is proceeding in accordance with the objectives for the third year. Pilot scale experiments conducted at the University of Utah were aimed at confirming the importance of oxygen injection strategy for different types of burners. CFD modeling at REI was used to better understand the potential for increased corrosion under oxygen enhanced combustion conditions. Data from a full-scale demonstration test in Springfield, MO were analyzed. OTM element development continued with preliminary investigation of an alternative method of fabrication of PSO1d elements. OTM process development continued with long-term testing of a PSO1d element. Economic evaluation has confirmed the advantage of oxygen-enhanced combustion. Proposals have been submitted for two additional beta test sites. A first commercial proposal has been submitted. Economic analysis of a beta site test performance was conducted.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Thompson, David R.; Bool, Lawrence E. & Chen, Jack C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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