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An Historical Inquiry Into the Development of Higher Education in Ghana 1948-1984: a Study of the Major Factors That Have Controlled and Inhibited the Development of the Universities of Ghana

Description: Universities in many industrialized countries including Japan, and Australia, have enabled those countries to achieve rapid economic and social advancement. However, this is untrue for the universities of Ghana, due to the country's ailing economy, its continued dependence on foreign manpower, aid, and material goods. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to illuminate the major factors and events that have controlled and inhibited the development of higher education in Ghana from 1948 to 1984. The method of acquiring data involved a computer and manual search for documents from 1) ERIC Database, 2) libraries , and 3) Embassy of Ghana, Washington, D.C. The findings include (1) Establishment of universities on the basis of the Asquith Doctrine; (2) Imitation of British universities' curriculum, constitution, standards and social functions; (3) Characterization of universities by elitism, lack of diversity and adaptation, autonomy, excellence and narrow specialism in their honor degree programs; (4) Emphasis on cognitive rather than psychomotor learning; (5) Matriculation of inadequately qualified secondary school science students; (6) Absence of a nationally formulated statement of manpower needs, goals, and effective long-term planning; (7) Financial exigencies; (8) Suppression, perversion and abuse of academic and intellectual freedom by the government and universities; (9) Inconsistent governmental policies due to abrupt changes in government by military coups.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Darko, Samuel F. (Samuel Fordjour)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Anglo-American Council on Productivity: 1948-1952 British Productivity and the Marshall Plan

Description: The United Kingdom's postwar economic recovery and the usefulness of Marshall Plan aid depended heavily on a rapid increase in exports by the country's manufacturing industries. American aid administrators, however, shocked to discover the British industry's inability to respond to the country's urgent need, insisted on aggressive action to improve productivity. In partial response, a joint venture, called the Anglo-American Council on Productivity (AACP), arranged for sixty-six teams involving nearly one thousand people to visit U.S. factories and bring back productivity improvement ideas. Analyses of team recommendations, and a brief review of the country's industrial history, offer compelling insights into the problems of relative industrial decline. This dissertation attempts to assess the reasons for British industry's inability to respond to the country's economic emergency or to maintain its competitive position faced with the challenge of newer industrializing countries.
Date: May 1999
Creator: Gottwald, Carl H.
Partner: UNT Libraries