Search Results

Sunbonnet

Description: Sunbonnet of black silk taffeta. The brim of the hat has 6 shirred hoops with deep padding in between, and a ruffled edge of the same fabric. At center back of neck, on the tail of the hat, is a flat bow of black silk taffeta, and the ties are of black silk taffeta ribbon. The crown is lined with brown glazed cotton fabric. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Date: 1850
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Hat

Description: Hat of off-white wool yarn and beads. Hat is based on a fanchon style, consisting of a knitted, somewhat diamond-shaped piece to fit across top of head and extending down sides to the ears with wide off-white silk ribbon ties at end of extensions. Unlike a regular fanchon, which is solely of a piece of flat lace, this cap has a deep pile of the same wool yarn over the entire surface of the cap, each piece tipped with a cylindrical frosted white bead.
Date: 1850
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

The Development of a Critical Standard for the Novel in Fraser's Magazine, 1830-1850

Description: This thesis is concerned with establishing the nature of the critical standard which Fraser's Magazine, a Victorian journal, used in evaluating the artistic merit of current English novels. Eminent critics such as William Thackeray, Thomas Carlyle, and William Maginn were associated with the magazine during its early years of publication: thus, the early numbers contain some of its most valuable criticism. Because the English novel was in a period of transition in the decade of the 1840's and the years immediately preceding and following it, this study is confined to the twenty-year period from I830 to 1850. Imitative writers of romance and novels of manners were gradually being replaced with novelists concerned with social reform and with the artistic merit of the genre itself. Thackeray's and Maginn's associations with the magazine also occurred during this period, and their literary opinions are an important indication of the magazine's critical development.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Lively, Cheryl L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Miniature Koran leaves

Description: 3D scanned models of leaves from a miniature Koran. Housed in rectangular brass(?) locket with oval applied lenticular illustration on cover showing bearded male figures in robes.
Date: 2016
Item Type: Dataset
Partner: UNT Libraries Rare Book and Texana Collections

Joshua

Description: Biography of Joshua, leader of the Children Of Israel after Moses. Written for children, with an emphasis on submission to God's will. Bound in illustrated wrappers.
Date: 1853-1857
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries Rare Book and Texana Collections

Miriam

Description: Biography of Miriam, sister of Moses and Aaron. Written for children, with an emphasis on submission to God's will. Bound in illustrated wrappers.
Date: 1853-1857
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries Rare Book and Texana Collections

Isaac

Description: Biography of Isaac, Patriarch of Israel. Written for children, with an emphasis on submission to God's will. Bound in illustrated wrappers.
Date: 1853-1857
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries Rare Book and Texana Collections

Rhymes, for infant minds.

Description: Mid-1800's children's book containing various poems with moral themes. Most deal with death of children, and how if they live right, they will go to heaven.
Date: c.1850
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries Rare Book and Texana Collections

Aaron

Description: Biography of Aaron, first High Priest of Israel. Written for children, with an emphasis on submission to God's will. Bound in illustrated wrappers.
Date: 1853/1857
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries Rare Book and Texana Collections

Mitts

Description: Pair of black cotton lace mitts. The wrist-length fingerless gloves are of hand-crocheted lace, in a wide mesh. Slight frill at wrist, and separate thumb. A narrow black ribbon is threaded through the cuff, one ribbon lacking.
Date: [1850..1867]
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

[Letter from the 1850]

Description: Letter written by an unidentified author. The letter is extremely faded. It appears that the author is concerned about the fate of the Confederacy; Clara's involvement in church and school; and family news and expressions of affection.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Letter
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress]

Description: Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing news from Bolivar, Tennessee. The letter is extremely faded and hard to read. The last page of the letter can be read in places and is not as faded as the beginning of the letter. It appears to be that on this last page Maud is discussing the marriage of Clara Bills and her departure to Williamson County. Maud discusses her servants Anne and Eliza, one of whom has 7 children who belonged to Maud, but who are now free. She expresses her wishes for David to visit and help her "arrange matters to live." At the end of the letter, Maud discusses issues of slavery, the freeing of slaves, and agriculture.
Date: 1850~
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Item Type: Letter
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Christening Gown

Description: Christening gown of white cotton muslin. Hand made and embroidered. Gathered waist trimmed in laisse anglais. Rounded neckline with V insert of eyelet lace. Eyelet trim at wrists, neck and hem. Scalloped insert panel down front trimmed in tatted eyelet with floral embroidery and six tiers of tatted eyelet. Center back opening is pleated with three covered buttons and drawstring at waist.
Date: 1850~
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

The Texas Press and the Filibusters of the 1850s: Lopez, Carvajal, and Walker

Description: The decade of the 1850s saw the Texas press separate into two opposing groups on the issue of filibustering. The basis for this division was the personal beliefs of the editors regarding the role filibustering should have in society. Although a lust for wealth drove most filibusters, the press justified territorial expansion along altruistic lines. By 1858, however, a few newspapers discarded this argument and condemned filibusters as lawless bands of ruffians plundering peaceful neighbors. Throughout the decade, the papers gradually drifted from a consensus in 1850 to discord by the date of William Walker's third attempt on Nicaragua in 1858.
Date: May 1983
Creator: Zemler, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Allen)
Partner: UNT Libraries