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The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats

Description: Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Date: 1910
Creator: Warburton, C. W. (Clyde William), 1879-1950
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analyses of Tipple and Delivered Samples of Coal: (Collected During the Fiscal Years 1948 to 1950 Inclusive)

Description: From Forward: "This bulletin is the first of a new series, which includes analyses of only tipple and delivered coal. It covers samples collected throughout the United States from July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1950 (fiscal years 1948-50). It is planned that future publications of this series will cover a period of one fiscal year only and be issued as soon as possible after June 30 of each year."
Date: 1953
Creator: Snyder, N. H. & Aresco, S. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Review of State Mine Inspector's Reports as They Relate to Accidents from Falls of Roof

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines over state mine inspection reports from 19 U.S. states. The information in the reports includes details of accidents, locations that specific accidents occurred, and proposed remedies for prevention of future accidents. This report includes tables.
Date: April 1929
Creator: Paul, James Washington
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Date: 1918
Creator: Beal, F. E. L. (Foster Ellenborough Lascelles), 1840-1916; McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962 & Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture

Description: This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Date: 1916
Creator: Beal, F. E. L. (Foster Ellenborough Lascelles), 1840-1916; McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962 & Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Annual Report of Research and Technologic Work on Coal: Fiscal Year 1941

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing the annual report over the research and technology of coal during 1941. As stated in the foreword, "these investigations increase our fund of exact knowledge on the properties and composition of American coals and lead to better methods in mining, preparing, storing, and utilizing coal" (p. 4). This report includes tables, illustrations, photographs, and a map.
Date: November 1941
Creator: Fieldner, Arno Carl & Schmidt, L. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Uranium in the Southern United States

Description: From introduction: In this study on raw material sources of uranium the Southern Interstate Nuclear Board has catalogued all known occurrences of uranium and some references to thorium in a 17-state area (P1. 1). These occurrences have been evaluated as potential sources of uranium by the State Geological Surveys and the consultant group of SINB. Favorability guides have been applied to the known occurrences and recommendations have been made for future action by the states involved, federal agencies, or by industry. State recommendations are included in state-by-state summaries. The state reports were written either by personnel of the State Geological Surveys or were abstracted from State geological survey data by members of the consultant group...The purpose of this study was to compile information on and systematically assess uranium and other radioactive occurrences in the region. The SINB undertook the project because of its statutory, interstate capability as an extension of government in each of the 17 states, an arrangement that lends itself effectively to this cooperative undertaking.
Date: November 1970
Creator: Southern Interstate Nuclear Board
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It

Description: "Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Luginbill, Philip
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Pay Secrecy

Description: This issue brief discusses pay secrecy policies that nearly half of workers nationally reported that they were either contractually forbidden or strongly discouraged from discussing their pay with their colleagues. Includes a listing of state laws that protect employees in discussing pay and compensation.
Date: June 2016
Creator: United States. Department of Labor.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1926
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1930
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1932
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
Date: 1940
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, sucking the juices of the plant and causing a swelling in the stem. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks no other kind of plant. The injury which it does to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the depredations of these two insects are often confused by farmers. This paper is intended, therefore, to give a brief outline of the life history and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended." -- p. 3-4
Date: 1918
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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