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A Comprehensive Analysis of Groundwater Quality in the Barnett Shale Region

Description: This article presents an analysis of 550 groundwater samples collected from private and public supply water wells drawing from aquifers overlying the Barnett shale formation of Texas.
Date: June 16, 2015
Creator: Hildenbrand, Zacariah Louis; Carlton Jr., Doug D.; Fontenot, Brian; Meik, Jesse M.; Walton, Jayme; Taylor, Josh et al.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Preliminary Report on Uranium Deposits in the Gulf Coastal Plain, Southern Texas

Description: Abstract: Concentration of secondary uranium minerals, some of which are commercially significant, have been found in three formations of Tertiary age in the Gulf Coastal Plain area of southern Texas: the Fayette sandstone of the Jackson formation, the Catahoula tuff, and the Oakville sandstone.
Date: November 1955
Creator: Steinhauser, S. R.; Beroni, E. P. & Blair, Robert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reconnaissance in the Western Part of the Trans-Pecos Region of Texas

Description: Abstract: The Trans-Pecos region of southwest Texas is noted for the production of quicksilver, lead, silver, and copper from its several mining districts. Reconnaissance, which was concentrated in and around these districts, revealed many areas of slightly abnormal radioactivity. Only a few areas, however, showed uranium mineralization.
Date: January 23, 1953
Creator: Hadfield, Jonathan P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modelling spatial concordance between Rocky Mountain spotted fever disease incidence and habitat probability of its vector Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick)

Description: This article reports on the development and comparison of two maps of Texas related to Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
Date: November 1, 2012
Creator: Atkinson, Samuel F.; Sarkar, Sahotra; Avina, Aldo; Schuermann, Jim A. & Williamson, Phillip C.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

A determination of the spatial concordance between Lyme disease incidence and habitat probability of its primary vector Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick)

Description: This article involves mapping the probability of occurrence that the disease vector exists in the environment, mapping the incidence of Lyme disease in the human population and examining the spatial concordance between the probability map and incidence map.
Date: November 1, 2014
Creator: Atkinson, Samuel F.; Sarkar, Sahotra; Avina, Aldo; Schuermann, Jim A. & Williamson, Phillip C.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Needs Assessment Study of Texas Academic, Public, and School Libraries: Final Report

Description: This document is the final report with the summary of the findings, conclusions, and recommendations for consideration by the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board (TIFB) Library Working Group as part of the Needs Assessment Study of Texas Academic, Public and School Libraries. The report is the work of the Needs Assessment Study Team, Texas Center for Digital Knowledge at the University of North Texas. The study was conducted during the period of February through September 15, 2002. Funding for the study was provided by Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board
Date: October 2002
Creator: Moen, William E.; Simpson, Carol; Mason, Florence & Wetherbee, Louella
Partner: UNT College of Information

A Needs Assessment Study of Texas Academic, Public, and School Libraries

Description: This is the project website for the Needs Assessment Study of Texas Academic, Public, and School Libraries, funded by a grant from the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board. It contains information on project documentation and their Final Report.
Date: January 2002
Creator: Moen, William E.; Simpson, Carol; Mason, Florence & Wetherbee, Louella
Partner: UNT College of Information

A White Paper on Outcomes Evaluation: Concepts, Strategies, and Practical Applications

Description: This white paper introduces evaluation concepts and describes outcome-based evaluation. The Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) logic model is described in the context of developing a program evaluation plan. Four case studies illustrate how outputs, outcomes and indicators can be used to produce programs results.
Date: December 10, 2002
Creator: Moen, William E.; Simpson, Carol; Mason, Florence & Wetherbee, Louella
Partner: UNT College of Information

Borrelia, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia spp. in Ticks Removed from Persons, Texas, USA

Description: This article analyzes the frequency and identity of pathogens and bacterial agents in ticks removed from humans and subsequently submitted to the Texas Department of State Health Services, Zoonosis Control Program, from October 1, 2004, through September 30, 2008.
Date: March 10, 2010
Creator: Williamson, Phillip C.; Billingsley, Peggy M.; Teltow, Glenna J.; Seals, Janel P.; Turnbough, Meredith A. & Atkinson, Samuel F.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Does an Online Post-baccalaureate Secondary Teacher Certification Program Produce Certified Teachers Who Remain in the Field?

Description: Given issues in education concerning teacher shortages, the omnipresence of alternative certification programs and the growth of online programs in higher education, this study investigated teacher retention for 77 secondary education teachers who completed an online teacher preparation program in Texas. Teacher retention was examined from 2003-2013 and investigated the influence of factors such personal characteristics, working conditions and school setting characteristics on teacher retention. Data was collected electronically utilizing a survey instrument designed by two teacher education experts and I. A total of 21 variables and two open-ended questions were investigated using the survey instrument. Exploratory factor and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify a multi-factor model for teacher retention utilizing the participants' survey responses. These analyses yielded evidence of the program's effectiveness in preparing teachers for long careers. Specifically, the areas of program support, field experience, and classroom management were statistically significant factors that contributed positively to teacher retention. Additionally, variables outside the program, were examined. These factors included personal characteristics, working conditions, and school setting factors. The predictor model accounted for 56% of the variance; F (17, 54) = 3.015; p = < 0.001. In particular, working conditions contributed to 41% of the variance associated with the teacher retention model. A qualitative analysis of open-ended survey questions was used to further examine decisions to remain in teaching. Support of administration, colleagues, staff, and parents was shown to influence teacher retention.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Brooks, Kanini Wanjira Ward
Partner: UNT Libraries

Women and the Superintendency: a Study of Texas Women Superintendents

Description: Education remains one of the most gender imbalanced fields, with disproportionately fewer women in higher levels of leadership. Women who reach leadership positions in education experience many triumphs and tribulations during their tenures as principals, assistant superintendents, and superintendents. The experiences of these women in their various administrative levels of leadership can provide important insight into the reasons for their success as women superintendents in Texas. This research has probed the career trajectory of nine women who have successfully attained and retained superintendencies in Texas to determine what career decisions have helped them and the challenges these women have faced in their positions. A qualitative research method, open-ended interviews, yielded several findings of what women considered important in proceeding from teaching through the various levels and ending in becoming superintendents. According to nine successful women superintendents in Texas, there are specific characteristics one can bring to the table that would really make a difference: Communication, collaboration, compassion, preparedness, hard work, and passion. All nine participants overcame challenges when climbing to the higher levels of leadership in education. These women have achieved success in the superintendency, and several factors appear to have played into the success of these women who have achieved in education’s top position.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Guajardo, Lesli Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Longitudinal Impact of Technology Immersion Through a One-to-One Mobile Technology Program on Reading and Math Performance in a Rural Title I Public School District

Description: In conjunction with the Texas Technology Immersion Pilot program (TIP), the State of Texas implemented a four-year annual evaluation called the Evaluation of the Texas Technology Immersion Pilot (eTxTiP). It focused on the technology immersion experience through one-to-one mobile technology of sixth grade students in 22 selected middle schools. Initial findings suggested academic growth, especially in math, increased rigor of student work, greater teacher collaboration, a more positive school environment, and transformation of instructional practices. This study focused on one of the original schools selected to participate in the TIP program, exploring the impact over time of one-to-one mobile technology on one group of students over an 8-year period beginning with their third grade year. The selected school’s demographic makeup reflected a large number of schools within the state, including its size, rural location and economically disadvantaged student population. Based on an interrupted time series design, state assessment data was analyzed using a piecewise growth model. The study revealed no statistically significant academic growth in reading and math performance among the participants.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Ice, Laura R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring the Dual-natured Impact of Digital Technology on Student-classroom Engagement in a Texas Public High School

Description: The past decade has become rife with an eagerness to integrate new digital technology into teaching. While there have been decades of research done on the importance of curriculum and pedagogy on student engagement, findings of actual technology integration are scarce. Moreover, what does it take to engage students in classroom activities and lessons when technology is introduced? The purpose of this study was to explore how digital technology, when integrated into classroom teaching and activities, impacted the students-classroom engagement based on the interim-cognitive, meta-cognitive, motivational, and behavioral markers. This was explored in a Texas public high school across the four core classes (English, Math, Science, and Social Studies. Data was collected in the form of observational field notes, transcripts of recorded lessons, and Likert-scaled surveys. Thematic analysis was used in analyzing qualitative data, Pearson’s correlation of those components found by factor analysis verified three of the five themes identified from the thematic analysis with statistical significance. The findings suggest that mere use of technology does not have a profound impact on student engagement. Instead, technology tends to amplify the existing classroom culture and social norms agreed upon between the teacher and their students. Texas teachers and students are also redefining the meaning of curriculum to include technology as a result of the attempted integration. This research finds that students’ hands-on activities under teachers’ guidance with the use of technology excel when teachers are molding digital work.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Ayers, Joseph J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Texas Paranormalists

Description: Texas Pararnormalists mixes participatory and observational styles in an effort to portray a small community of paranormal practitioners who live and work in and around North Texas. These practitioners include psychics, ghost investigators, and other enthusiasts and seekers of the spirit world. Through the documentation of their combined perspectives, Texas Paranormalists renders a portrait of a community of outsiders with a shared belief system and an unshakeable passion for reaching out into the unknown.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Goodman, David
Partner: UNT Libraries

Lone Star Insanity: Efforts to Treat the Mentally Ill in Texas, 1861-1929

Description: During the mid-nineteenth century, the citizens of Texas were forced to keep their mentally disturbed family members at home which caused stress on the caregivers and the further debilitation of the afflicted. To remedy this situation, mental health experts and Texas politicians began to create a system of healing known as state asylums. The purpose of this study is to determine how Texas mental health care came into being, the research and theories behind the prevention and treatment programs that asylum physicians employed to overcome mental illness, in addition to the victories and shortcomings of the system. Through this work, it will be shown that during the 1850s until the 1920s institutions faced difficulty in achieving success from many adverse conditions including, but not limited to, overcrowding, large geographical conditions, poor health practices, faulty construction, insufficient funding, ineffective prevention and treatment methods, disorganization, cases of patient abuse, incompetent employees, prejudice, and legal improprieties. As a result, by 1930, these asylums were merely places to detain the mentally ill in order to rid them from society. This thesis will also confirm that while both Texas politicians and mental health experts desired to address and overcome mental illness in Texas, they were unable to do so due to arguments, selfishness, corruption, failures, and inaction on the part of both sides. However, this thesis will ultimately reveal it was lack of full support from Texas legislators, deriving from the idea that this system was not one of their top priorities among the state’s concerns, that led to the inability of the Texas mental health care system to properly assist their patients.
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Date: December 2015
Creator: Boyd, Dalton T.
Partner: UNT Libraries

School and Community Partnerships: Effect on At-risk Elementary Student Populations

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the current practices of school and community partnerships in five North Texas elementary schools. In addition, the study focused on the influence community partnerships have on at-risk students based on at-risk indicators data. The literature revealed that when schools, parents, and families work together, students tend to earn higher grades, attend school more regularly, stay in school longer, and enrolled in coursework beyond high school. The target population included approximately 350 administrators, teachers, and paraprofessionals from five North Texas elementary schools. Also included were the respective partners from each of the five elementary schools. This research included online survey instrument and data were gathered and analyzed through a combination of statistical procedures and descriptive and inferential statistics. The results may provide other schools with a profile of school and community partnerships that can be implemented as a method to help their at-risk student populations. Findings included a descriptive analysis of factors that contributed to the success of community engagement efforts as well as those factors that limited those efforts. A secondary purpose of this study was of continuous improvement in developing these approaches through a goal-setting approach. Schools included in the study provided a next steps plan by describing their major goal(s) for improving existing school and community partnerships over the next 3 years.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Tucker, Linda Cavazos
Partner: UNT Libraries