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Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

Description: The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.
Date: April 15, 1998
Creator: Mast, J., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Concentration of uranium and plutonium in unsaturated spent fuel tests.

Description: Commercial spent fuel is being tested under oxidizing conditions at 90 C in drip tests with simulated groundwater to evaluate its long-term performance in a potential repository at Yucca Mountain [1-4]. The tests allow us to monitor the dissolution behavior of the spent fuel matrix and the release rates of individual radionuclides. This paper reports the U and Pu concentrations in the leachates of drip tests during 3.7 years of reaction. Changes in these concentrations are correlated with changes in the measured pH and the appearance of alteration products on the fuel surface. Although there is little thermodynamic information at 90 C for either uranyl or plutonium compounds, some data are available at 25 C [5-8]. The literature data for the U and Pu solubilities of U and Pu compounds were compared to the U and Pu concentrations in the leachates. We also compare Wilson's [9] U and Pu concentrations in semi-static tests at 85 C on spent fuel with our results.
Date: April 15, 1998
Creator: Finn, P. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of system simulation for engineering the technical computing environment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratorie

Description: This report summarizes an investigation performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory� s (LLNL) Scientific Computing & Communications Department (SCCD) and the Garland Location of Raytheon Systems Company (RSC) from April through August.1998. The study assessed the applicability and benefits of utilizing System Simulation in architecting and deploying technical computing assets at LLNL, particularly in support of the ASCI program and associated scientific computing needs. The recommendations and other reported findings reflect the consensus of the investigation team. The investigation showed that there are potential benefits to performing component level simulation within SCCD in support of the ASCI program. To illustrate this, a modeling exercise was conducted by the study team that generated results consistent with measured operational performance. This activity demonstrated that a relatively modest effort could improve the toolset for making architectural trades and improving levels of understanding for managing operational practices. This capability to evaluate architectural trades was demonstrated by evaluating some of the productivity impacts of changing one of the design parameters of an existing file transfer system. The use of system simulation should be tailored to the local context of resource requirements/limitations, technology plans/processes/issues, design and deployment schedule, and organizational factors. In taking these matters into account, we recommend that simulation modeling be employed within SCCD on a limited basis for targeted engineering studies, and that an overall performance engineering program be established to better equip the Systems Engineering organization to direct future architectural decisions and operational practices. The development of an end-to-end modeling capability and enterprise-level modeling system within SCCD is not warranted in view of the associated development requirements and difficulty in determining firm operational performance requirements in advance of the critical architectural decisions. These recommendations also account for key differences between the programmatic and institutional environments at LLNL and RSC.
Date: September 15, 1998
Creator: Boyd, V; Edmunds, T; Minuzzo, K; Powell, E & Roche, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

Description: The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.
Date: December 15, 1998
Creator: Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J. & Slutter, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development & Testing of Industrial Scale, Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3

Description: In the third quarter of calendar year 1997, 10 days of tests on the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility were performed. The total test days on the Philadelphia facility to the end of September 1997 was 93, of which 19 tests were implemented as part of another DOE project. This exceeds the planned 63 test days for this project. Key project objectives have been exceeded, including NO emissions as low as 0.07 lb/MMBtu and SO emissions as low as 0.2 x 2 lb/MMBtu. The tests in the present quarter focussed on further optimizing post-combustion sorbent injection for SO2 and NOx control processes. The results were in the same range as in previous tests. In addition, initial tests of Coal Tech�s post-combustion NOx control process were implemented on a 100 MW and a 37 MW utility boiler, and NOx reductions as high as 40% were measured in the latter boiler.
Date: January 15, 1998
Creator: Zauderer, Bert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alignment and micro-inspection system

Description: A video microscope system has been designed and installed in the C-tank, a 3-g, high-explosive firing chamber in HEAF (High Explosives Applications Facility in LLNL). This microscope system helps a great deal, not only for precision alignment of the laser beam on the minute target for the Fabry-Perot velocimeter, but also for in situ inspection of the target before and after the experiment. In addition, the video information can also be stored in the PC computer as database documentati
Date: September 15, 1998
Creator: Chau, H; Hodgin, R L & Moua, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent nuclear fuel project recommended reaction rate constants for corrosion of N-Reactor fuel

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the Hanford Site`s K Basins. The SNF Project has been tasked by the DOE with moving the spent N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to contained dry storage in order to reduce operating costs and environmental hazards. The chemical reactivity of the fuel must be understood at each process step and during long-term dry storage. Normally, the first step would be to measure the N-fuel reactivity before attempting thermal-hydraulic transfer calculations; however, because of the accelerated project schedule, the initial modeling was performed using literature values for uranium reactivity. These literature values were typically found for unirradiated, uncorroded metal. It was fully recognized from the beginning that irradiation and corrosion effects could cause N-fuel to exhibit quite different reactivities than those commonly found in the literature. Even for unirradiated, uncorroded uranium metal, many independent variables affect uranium metal reactivity resulting in a wide scatter of data. Despite this wide reactivity range, it is necessary to choose a defensible model and estimate the reactivity range of the N-fuel until actual reactivity can be established by characterization activities. McGillivray, Ritchie, and Condon developed data and/or models that apply for certain samples over limited temperature ranges and/or reaction conditions (McGillivray 1994, Ritchie 1981 and 1986, and Condon 1983). These models are based upon small data sets and have relatively large correlation coefficients.
Date: June 15, 1998
Creator: Cooper, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observation of photoexcited emission clusters in the bulk of KDP and laser conditioning under 355-nm irradiation

Description: Defect clusters in the bulk of large KDP crystals are revealed using a microscopic fluorescence imaging system and CW laser illumination. Exposure of the crystal to high power 355-nm, 3-ns laser irradiation leads to a significant reduction of the number of observed optically active centers. The initially observed defect cluster concentration is approximately 10<sup>4</sup>-10<sup>6</sup> per mm<sup>3</sup> depending on the crystal growth method and sector of the crystal. The number of defect clusters can be reduced by a factor of 10<sup>2</sup> or more under exposure to 355-nm laser irradiation while their average intensities also decreases. Spectroscopic measurements provide information on the electronic structure of the defects.
Date: December 15, 1998
Creator: De Yoreo, J. J.; Demos, S. G.; Radousky, H. B.; Staggs, M. & Yan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress wave focusing transducers

Description: Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.
Date: May 15, 1998
Creator: Visuri, S.R., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Turbulences in boundary plasmas

Description: We simulate boundary plasma turbulence using a 3D turbulence code BOUT and a linearized electromagnetic instability shooting code BAL. The code BOUT solves fluid equations for plasma vorticity,density, ion temperature and parallel momentum (along the magnetic field), electron temperature, and parallel momentum. A realistic DIII-D X point magnetic geometry is used. The focus is on the possible local linear instability drivers and turbulence suppression mechanisms from L to H mode. Comparison is made with data from the DIII-D toltamak where probe measurements provide turbulence statistics in the boundary plasma and transport modeling.
Date: May 15, 1998
Creator: Xu, X. Q., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA filter box

Description: This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the safe onsite transport of eight high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA Filter Box from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site to the Central Waste Complex and on to burial in the 200 West Area. Use of this SEP is authorized for 1 year from the date of release.
Date: July 15, 1998
Creator: McCoy, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sheath over a finely structured divertor plate

Description: The surface of a divertor plate typically has fine structure. Depending on the material - and the duration of exposure to the plasma, the characteristic size of the surface imperfections may vary over a broad range. In this paper, we consider the case where these structures have scale h that is much smaller than the ion gyroradius {rho}{sub i} but greater than the electron gyroradius {rho}{sub e}. The magnetic field intersects the divertor plate at a shallow angle {alpha}<<I. The present paper demonstrates that the combination of these two factors, fine surface structures and strongly tilted magnetic field, gives rise to many interesting new phenomena in the sheath. We consider only the plasma part of the problem: given the presence of some structure, what are the consequences in terms of the plasma properties in the vicinity of the surface? We are not addressing the issue of what process has caused the appearance of the structure. However, once the plasma part of the problem is solved, on could return to the analysis of the wall erosion problem, based on the solution obtained. For the environment of the divertor region of a medium-size tokamak (plasma density n{approximately}4x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, plasma temperature T{approximately}50 eV, the magnetic field strength B{approximately} 2T), one has: {rho}{sub i} {approximately}500 {micro}m (hydrogen), {rho}{sub e}{approximately}10 {micro}m. We, therefore, are going to analyze the scales of imperfections in the range 10 {micro}m <h<500 {micro}m. These scales are quite typical for a number of fusion devices. For reference purpose, one can mention that the Debye radius {rho}{sub D} is {approximately} 10 {micro}m. We will use the following model of the surface: we assume that it is formed by the randomly distributed cones of height h, with base radius and the distance between neighboring cones both also of order h. This ...
Date: May 15, 1998
Creator: Cohen, R. H., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Managing America's solid waste

Description: This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.
Date: September 15, 1998
Creator: Phillips, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

X-band photoinjector for a chirped-pulse FEL

Description: The phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of a high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. When > 100 coherently phased 5 MeV electron bunches are produced in bursts, the photoinjector should be an ideal electron source for a pulsed, pre-bunched free-electron laser (FEL) operating at 100 GHz. The laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT and klystron. A comparison between the klystron and TWT amplifier phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a rf oscillator such as a magnetron or a compact source such as a cross-field amplifier. In particular, the rf gun can play the role of a pulsed rf clock to synchronize the photocathode laser system: direct drive of a synchronously mode-locked AlGaAs quantum well laser has been achieved using the X0-band gun rf fields. This novel, GHz repetition rate, sub-picosecond laser system is being developed to replace the more conventional femtosecond Ti: Al<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> system. Some advantages include pumping this laser with a stabilized current source instead of a costly, low efficiency pump laser. Finally, dark current measurements and initial photoelectron measurements are reported.
Date: December 15, 1998
Creator: Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; Alvis, R. M.; Baldis, H. A.; Hartemann, F. V; Heritage, J. P.; Ho, C. H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Support of theoretical high energy physics research at the Supercomputer Computations Research Institute]. Final report, September 30, 1992--July 31, 1997

Description: The research primarily involved lattice field theory simulations such as Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. Among the works completed by the members of the lattice group and their outside collaborators in QCD simulations are extensive hadronic spectrum computations with both Wilson and staggered fermions, and calculations of hadronic matrix elements and wavefunctions. Studies of the QCD {beta} function with two flavors of Wilson fermions, and the study of a possible flavor-parity breaking phase in QCD with two flavors of Wilson fermions have been completed. Studies of the finite temperature behavior of QCD have also been a major activity within the group. Studies of non-relativistic QCD, both for heavy-heavy mesons and for the heavy quark in heavy-light mesons have been done. Combining large N analytic computations within the Higgs sector of the standard model and numerical simulations at N = 4 have yielded a computation of the upper bound of the mass of the Higgs particle, as well as the energy scale above which deviations from the Standard Model may be expected. A major research topic during the second half of the grant period was the study of improved lattice actions, designed to diminish finite lattice spacing effects and thus accelerate the approach to the continuum limit. A new exact Local Hybrid Monte Carlo (overrelaxation) algorithm with a tunable overrelaxation parameter has been developed for pure gauge theories. The characteristics of this algorithm have been investigated. A study of possible instabilities in the global HMC algorithm has been completed.
Date: December 15, 1998
Creator: Bitar, K.M.; Edwards, R.G.; Heller, U.M. & Kennedy, A.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

Description: The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.
Date: August 15, 1998
Creator: White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Designs Studies of Low-Aspect Ratio Quasi-Omnigenous Stellarators

Description: Significant progress has been made in the development of new modest-size compact stellarator devices that could test optimization principles for the design of a more attractive reactor. These are 3 and 4 field period low-aspect-ratio quasi-omnigenous (QO) stellarators based on an optimization method that targets improved confinement, stability, ease of coil design, low-aspect-ratio, and low bootstrap current.
Date: October 15, 1998
Creator: Batchelor, D.B.; Carreras, B.A.; Hirshman, S.P.; Lynch, V.E.; Sanchez, R.; Spong, D.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Continuous, Rapid Production of Uniform Microparticles by Electrodispersion

Description: Ultrafine particles constitute the key building blocks for diverse advanced structural and functional materials, such as high-performance ceramics and alloys. These advanced materials have tremendous impact in many areas, including catalysis, separations, electronics, energy production processes, and environmental applications. Of particular importance, nanophase ceramic or metallic materials that contain nanosized (&lt;100 nm) particles/grains show dramatically improved performance (mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, and/or catalytic). The characteristics of ultrafine particles (i.e. size, morphology, monodispersity, purity, and homogeneity of composition) directly determine the properties of the materials that are made from them. Thus, the future application of advanced materials depends strongly on the capability to produce particles with outstanding characteristics.
Date: November 15, 1998
Creator: DePaoli, D.W. & Hu, M.Z.-C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Influence of E{times}B and {nabla}{ital B} deift terms in 2-D edge/SOL transport simulations

Description: Classical particle drifts across the magnetic field can play an important role in tokamak edge-plasma transport. The relative influence of these terms is studied for self-consistent simulations by including them, together with anomalous diffusion transport, in a 2-D fluid model of edge-plasma transport for the DIII-D tokamak geometry. The drifts cause asymmetries in the plasma equilibrium which depend on the direction of the magnetic field, B. The basic results can be understood by dividing the drifts into three categories: diamagnetic, E x B, and {nabla}B. The dominant effect near the divertor plates is from the E x B drifts, while the weaker {nabla}B drifts cause an increase in the magnitude of the radial electric field inside the magnetic separatrix. The diamagnetic terms, defined as divergence free, do not contribute to transport.
Date: May 15, 1998
Creator: Rognlien, T. D., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers

Description: Six Product Removal (PR) Cans and Containers are located within the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Each can is expected to contain a maximum of 3 g of residual radioactive material, consisting mainly of plutonium isotopes. The PR Can Containers were previously authorized by HNF-SD-TP-SEP-064, Rev. 0 (Boettger 1997), for the interarea transport of up to 3 g of plutonium. The purpose of this safety evaluation for packaging is to allow the transport of six PR Cans with their Containers from the Plutonium Finishing Plant to the 233 S Evaporator Facility. This safety evaluation for packaging is authorized for use until April 29, 1999, or until the shipment is made, whichever happens first.
Date: April 15, 1998
Creator: Burnside, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design review report: 200 East upgrades for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations

Description: This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the contractor design verification methodology and records associated with project W-314`s 200 East (200E) Upgrades design package. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for this design. Acceptance of the comment dispositions and closure of the review comments is indicated by the signatures of the participating reviewers. Project W-314 is a project within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Retrieval Program. This project provides capital upgrades for the existing Hanford tank farm waste transfer, instrumentation, ventilation, and electrical infrastructure systems. To support established TWRS programmatic objectives, the project is organized into two distinct phases. The initial focus of the project (i.e., Phase 1) is on waste transfer system upgrades needed to support the TWRS Privatization waste feed delivery system. Phase 2 of the project will provide upgrades to support resolution of regulatory compliance issues, improve tank infrastructure reliability, and reduce overall plant operating/maintenance costs. Within Phase 1 of the W-314 project, the waste transfer system upgrades are further broken down into six major packages which align with the project`s work breakdown structure. Each of these six sub-elements includes the design, procurement, and construction activities necessary to accomplish the specific tank farm upgrades contained within the package. The first design package (AN Valve Pit Upgrades) was completed in November 1997, and the associated design verification activities are documented in HNF-1893. The second design package, 200 East (200E) Upgrades, was completed in March 1998. This design package identifies modifications to existing valve pits 241-AX-B and 241-A-B, as well as several new waste transfer pipelines to be constructed within the A Farm Complex of the 200E Area. The scope of the valve pit modifications includes new pit cover blocks, valve manifolds, leak detectors, and special protective coatings similar to those previously approved ...
Date: April 15, 1998
Creator: Boes, K.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Material protection, control and accounting cooperation at the Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP), Novouralsk, Russia

Description: The Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant is one of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy`s nuclear material production sites participating in the US Department of Energy`s Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program. The Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant is Russia`s largest uranium enrichment facility and blends tons of high-enriched uranium into low enriched uranium each year as part of the US high-enriched uranium purchase. The Electrochemical Integrated Plant and six participating national laboratories are cooperating to implement a series of enhancements to the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability systems at the site This paper outlines the overall objectives of the MPC&A program at Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant and the work completed as of the date of the presentation.
Date: July 15, 1998
Creator: McAllister, S., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron total and capture cross section measurements and resonance parameter analysis of tungsten from 0.01 eV to 200 eV

Description: Natural tungsten metal was measured using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Gaerttner Laboratory linear accelerator to determine the tungsten resonance parameters. Three separate measurements were performed: transmission, capture, and self-indication. Previous measurements did not employ all three experiment types and used less sophisticated methods. The current work improves on the published tungsten data base and reduces resonance parameter uncertainties.
Date: June 15, 1998
Creator: Werner, C.J.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Overberg, M.E.; Moretti, B.E.; Burke, J.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid waste information and tracking system client-server conversion project management plan

Description: This Project Management Plan is the lead planning document governing the proposed conversion of the Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) to a client-server architecture. This plan presents the content specified by American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards for software development, with additional information categories deemed to be necessary to describe the conversion fully. This plan is a living document that will be reviewed on a periodic basis and revised when necessary to reflect changes in baseline design concepts and schedules. This PMP describes the background, planning and management of the SWITS conversion. It does not constitute a statement of product requirements. Requirements and specification documentation needed for the SWITS conversion will be released as supporting documents.
Date: April 15, 1998
Creator: May, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department