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A,B,C`s of nuclear science

Description: This introductory level presentation contains information on nuclear structure, radioactivity, alpha decay, beta decay, gamma decay, half-life, nuclear reactions, fusion, fission, cosmic rays, and radiation protection. Nine experiments with procedures and test questions are included.
Date: August 7, 1995
Creator: Noto, V.A.; Norman, E.B.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Dairiki, J.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tank 241-T-201, core 192 analytical results for the final report

Description: This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-201. Push mode core segments were removed from Riser 3 between April 24, 1997, and April 25, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-201 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997), Letter of Instruction for Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI) (Bell, 1997), Additional Core Composite Sample from Drainable Liquid Samples for Tank 241-T-2 01 (ACC) (Hall, 1997), and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report.
Date: August 7, 1997
Creator: Nuzum, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parameter identification and on-line estimation for reduced kinetic model

Description: The base hydrolysis process for the destruction of energetic or explosive materials results is a high pH hydrolysate solution with reaction products that include a series of carboxylic acid salts, glycolates, amines, and nitrates. The hydrolysate solutions obtained from this process contain from two to ten wt% of organic carbon and nitrogen compounds that must be further treated before disposal. Hydrothermal oxidation at elevated temperatures (450 C) and pressure (14,000 psi) was selected as the treatment process for the hydrolysate solutions obtained from hydrolysis of the high explosive PBX 9404 at the Department of Energy Pantex facility in Amarillo, Texas. In this work, the authors describe the use of receding horizon identification and estimation techniques to determine the model parameters for a reduced kinetic model describing the oxidation-reduction reactions in a hydrothermal oxidation reactor. This model is used in a model predictive controller that minimizes the total aqueous nitrogen in the hydrothermal oxidation reactor effluent.
Date: August 7, 1998
Creator: Littel, J.D.; Muske, K.R.; Del`Orco, P.C.; Le, L.A. & Flesner, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 1

Description: This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following calculations: Exhaust airflow sizing for Tank 241-C-106; Equipment sizing and selection recirculation fan; Sizing high efficiency mist eliminator; Sizing electric heating coil; Equipment sizing and selection of recirculation condenser; Chiller skid system sizing and selection; High efficiency metal filter shielding input and flushing frequency; and Exhaust skid stack sizing and fan sizing.
Date: August 7, 1998
Creator: Bailey, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

Description: Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.
Date: August 7, 2000
Creator: PAJUNEN, A.L. & LANGEVIN, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidative Mineralization and Characterization of Polyvinyl Alcohol Solutions for Wastewater Treatment

Description: Photochemical and ultrasonic treatment of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), derived from PVA fabric material, with hydrogen peroxide was evaluated as a primary method for PVA mineralization into simpler organic molecules. PVA-based waste streams have been found to be compatible with nuclear process wastewater treatment facilities only when solubilized PVA is more than 90 percent mineralized with hydrogen peroxide. No undesirable solid particles are formed with other nuclear process liquid waste when they are mixed, pH adjusted, evaporated and blended with this type of oxidized PVA waste streams. The presence of oxidized PVA in a typical nuclear process wastewater has been found to have no detrimental effect on the efficiency of ion exchange resins, inorganic, and precipitation agents used for the removal of radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. The disappearance of PVA solution in hydrogen peroxide with ultrasonic/ ultraviolet irradiation treatment was characterized by pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. Radioactive waste contaminated PVA fabric can be solubilized and mineralized to produce processible liquid waste, hence, no bulky solid waste disposal cost can be incurred and the radionuclides can be effectively recovered. Therefore, PVA fabric materials can be considered as an effective substitute for cellulose fabrics that are currently used in radioactive waste decontamination processes.
Date: August 7, 2003
Creator: Oji, L.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY03 Annual Report for Environmental Management Science Program - Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides

Description: The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.
Date: August 7, 2003
Creator: Hobbs, D.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report

Description: This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of ...
Date: August 7, 2002
Creator: Simmons, Joseph H. & Bukowski, Tracie J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Variations in Slit Trench Dimensions to Allow Disposal of Large Components

Description: Some large components exist that have radionuclide concentrations low enough that they meet the WAC limits for Slit Trenches, but they are too large to be directly disposed in slit trenches of the nominal dimensions. This analysis considers the effect of the variations and concludes that such variations will meet the disposal requirements set by the performance assessment.
Date: August 7, 2003
Creator: Cook, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance predictions for the Keck telescope adaptive optics system

Description: The second Keck ten meter telescope (Keck-11) is slated to have an infrared-optimized adaptive optics system in the 1997--1998 time frame. This system will provide diffraction-limited images in the 1--3 micron region and the ability to use a diffraction-limited spectroscopy slit. The AO system is currently in the preliminary design phase and considerable analysis has been performed in order to predict its performance under various seeing conditions. In particular we have investigated the point-spread function, energy through a spectroscopy slit, crowded field contrast, object limiting magnitude, field of view, and sky coverage with natural and laser guide stars.
Date: August 7, 1995
Creator: Gavel, D.T. & Olivier, S.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost uncertainty for different levels of technology maturity

Description: It is difficult at best to apply a single methodology for estimating cost uncertainties related to technologies of differing maturity. While highly mature technologies may have significant performance and manufacturing cost data available, less well developed technologies may be defined in only conceptual terms. Regardless of the degree of technical maturity, often a cost estimate relating to application of the technology may be required to justify continued funding for development. Yet, a cost estimate without its associated uncertainty lacks the information required to assess the economic risk. For this reason, it is important for the developer to provide some type of uncertainty along with a cost estimate. This study demonstrates how different methodologies for estimating uncertainties can be applied to cost estimates for technologies of different maturities. For a less well developed technology an uncertainty analysis of the cost estimate can be based on a sensitivity analysis; whereas, an uncertainty analysis of the cost estimate for a well developed technology can be based on an error propagation technique from classical statistics. It was decided to demonstrate these uncertainty estimation techniques with (1) an investigation of the additional cost of remediation due to beyond baseline, nearly complete, waste heel retrieval from underground storage tanks (USTs) at Hanford; and (2) the cost related to the use of crystalline silico-titanate (CST) rather than the baseline CS100 ion exchange resin for cesium separation from UST waste at Hanford.
Date: August 7, 1996
Creator: DeMuth, S. F. & Franklin, A. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department