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Minable Reserves, Petrography, Chemical Characteristics, and Washability Tests of Coal Occurring in the Coos Bay Coal Field, Coos County, Oregon

Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing the coal reserves of Coos County, Oregon. Investigations conducted on the minable coal reserves are presented in detail. This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1948
Creator: Toenges, Albert L.; Dowd, James J.; Turnbull, Louis A.; Schopf, J. M.; Cooper, H. M.; Toenges, Albert L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Burning Washington Coals on Different Types of Domestic Stokers in the Same Hot-Water Boiler: Comparison with Hand and Oil Firing

Description: From Purpose and Scope: "This bulletin presents the results of an investigation of domestic stokers at the Northwest Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines. Previous publications have dealt with the burning characteristics of Washington coals on a domestic overfeed stoker, a clinker-type domestic underfeed stoker, and an ash-removal-type domestic underfeed stoker designed for burning anthracite. This report includes all the principal results obtained on the three domestic stokers tested and compares these results with those obtained on the same hot-water boiler by hand-firing and oil-firing."
Date: 1949
Creator: Yancey, H. F.; Johnson, K. A.; Cordiner, J. B., Jr.; Lewis, A. A. & Lunde, K. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diatomites of the Pacific Northwest as Filter-Aids

Description: From Introduction Purpose of Investigation: "To determine some of the physical and chemical properties of known Pacific Northwest diatomites, the present investigation was started in 1938 by the Bureau of Mines in cooperation with the College of Mines, University of Washington.
Date: 1944
Creator: Skinner, Kenneth G.; Dammann, Arthur A.; Swift, Roy E.; Eyerly, George B. & Shuck, Gordon R., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Columbia River Magnetite Sands, Clatsop County, Oregon, and Pacific County, Washington, Hammond and McGowan Deposits

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on investigations of the magnetite-bearing sands near the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. Properties of the sands and magnetite deposits are listed. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Date: February 1947
Creator: Kelly, James V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quicksilver Deposits of the Opalite District, Malheur County, Oregon and Humboldt County, Nevada

Description: From Introduction: "The Opalite quicksilver district includes two deposits with a considerable past production, one deposit with a small production, and one unproved prospect. These deposits are located along the circumference of a semicircular area that extends from a short distance west of McDermitt, Nev., for about 20 miles along the Oregon-Nevada State boundary. (See fig. 34). The area thus includes parts of Humboldt County, Nev., and Malheur County, Oreg.; almost the entire production has been derived from the portion in Oregon."
Date: 1942
Creator: Yates, Robert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some Quicksilver Prospects in Adjacent Parts of Nevada, California, and Oregon

Description: Abstract: This report summarizes the results of reconnaissance study of quicksilver deposits in the northwestern corner of Nevada, the northeastern corner of California, and Lake County, Oreg. made in August 1940. The Lene Pine district, Nevada, the Silvertown and Red Hawk properties in California, and the Currier and Glass Butte properties in Oregon were included. The first two of these require further development before a definite opinion as to their value can be formed. The Red Hawk mine has yielded high-grade ore, but the ore bodies so far worked are very small and scattered. The small amount of development at the recently opened Currier mine has yielded encouraging results. The deposits in the Glass Buttes are large but of such low grade that thorough sampling would be needed to determine their value. In general the region appears to warrant more attention from quicksilver prospectors than it has yet received.
Date: 1941
Creator: Ross, Clyde P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nickel Deposit Near Riddle, Douglas County, Oregon

Description: From Introduction: "The Riddle nickel deposit is on Nickel Mountain, also called Piney Mountain, about 5 miles northwest of Riddle, Douglas Country, Oreg. (fig. 20). The deposit is an unevenly distributed surficial blanket, containing the nickel silicate garnierite, which rests upon peridotitic rocks on the western, southern, and southeastern slopes of the mountain above an elevation of 2,000 feet. It is on the Southern Pacific Railroad, and it is about 230 miles by highway south of Portland. A poorly conditioned dirt road about 5 miles long connects the town with the nickel deposit."
Date: 1942
Creator: Pecora, William T. & Hobbs, S. Warren
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quicksilver Deposits in the Steens and Pueblo Mountains, Southern Oregon

Description: From Scope of Report: "During the summer of 1940, 34 days were spent in a preliminary study of the quicksilver deposits in the Steens and Pueblo Mountains. Nearly all of the quicksilver prospects were examined and mapped, and the general geology of the east flank of the mountains from north of Andrews to Denio was reconnoitered."
Date: 1942
Creator: Ross, Clyde P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department