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Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U

Description: Recent experiments in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, B{sub toroidal} = 2 kG, I{sub P} = 100 kA, T{sub e}(0) = 100 eV, n{sub e}(0) {approx} 5 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium tray limiter with an area of 2000 cm{sup 2} (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium-limited discharges are consistent with Z{sub effective} < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced.
Date: October 28, 2004
Creator: Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments

Description: The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.
Date: February 28, 2004
Creator: Shaw, Timothy & Whisker, Vaugh
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collisional Transport in a Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak -- Beyond the Drift Kinetic Formalism

Description: Calculations of collisional thermal and particle diffusivities in toroidal magnetic plasma confinement devices order the toroidal gyroradius to be small relative to the poloidal gyroradius. This ordering is central to what is usually referred to as neoclassical transport theory. This ordering is incorrect at low aspect ratio, where it can often be the case that the toroidal gyroradius is larger than the poloidal gyroradius. We calculate the correction to the particle and thermal diffusivities at low aspect ratio by comparing the diffusivities as determined by a full orbit code (which we refer to as omni-classical diffusion) with those from a gyroaveraged orbit code (neoclassical diffusion). In typical low aspect ratio devices the omni-classical diffusion can be up to 2.5 times the calculated neoclassical value. We discuss the implications of this work on the analysis of collisional transport in low aspect ratio magnetic confinement experiments.
Date: January 28, 2004
Creator: Gates, D.A. & White, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast Ion Effects on Fishbones and n=1 Kinks in JET Simulated by a Non-perturbative NOVA-KN Code

Description: New global non-perturbative hybrid code, NOVA-KN, and simulations of resonant type modes in JET [Joint European Torus] plasmas driven by energetic H-minority ions are presented. The NOVA-KN code employs the ideal-MHD description for the background plasma and treats non-perturbatively the fast particle kinetic response, which includes the fast ion finite orbit width (FOW) effect. In particular, the n = 1 fishbone mode, which is in precession drift resonance with fast ions, is studied. The NOVA-KN code is applied to model an n = 1 (f = 50-80kHz) MHD activity observed recently in JET low density plasma discharges with high fast ion (H-minority) energy content generated during the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). This n = 1 MHD activity is interpreted as the instability of the n = 1 precession drift frequency fishbone modes.
Date: October 28, 2004
Creator: Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.; Kiptily, V.G.; Mantsinen, M.J.; Sharapov, S.E. & Contributors, the JET-EFDA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observations of Anisotropic Ion Temperature in the NSTX Edge during RF Heating

Description: A new spectroscopic diagnostic with both toroidal and poloidal views has been implemented in the edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) was designed to measure the velocity and temperature of ions. The intersection of the diagnostic sightlines with the intrinsic emission shell provides the localization of the measurement. There are 7 toroidally directed views and 6 poloidally directed views of the outboard plasma edge. The poloidal view is {approx}20 cm (toroidally) from the RF antenna, and the toroidal view is {approx}2 m away. The sightlines are nearly tangent to the flux surfaces. The C{sup 2+} triplet near 4651 {angstrom} and the He{sup +} line at 4685 {angstrom} are measured. In the results presented here, helium is the bulk, ''working'' ion of the discharge. The NSTX is a large spherical tokamak with a major radius of 0.85 m and a minor radius of 0.65 m. The outer walls and center-stack are lined with protective carbon tiles. Pulse lengths for these NSTX discharges are {approx} 600 ms, with an on-axis toroidal magnetic field of {approx} 0.3 T. The plasma current is 500 kA. The on-axis electron temperature and density are {le} 2 keV and {approx} 2 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, respectively with {le} 4.3 MW of High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) Radio Frequency (RF) auxiliary heating.
Date: June 28, 2004
Creator: Biewer, T.M.; Bell, R.E.; Ryan, P.M. & Wilson, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the APS Neutrino Study Reactor Working Group

Description: The worldwide program to understand neutrino oscillations and determine the neutrino mixing parameters, CP violating effects, and mass hierarchy will require a broad combination of measurements. The group believes that a key element of this future neutrino program is a multi-detector neutrino experiment (with baselines of {approx} 200 m and {approx} 1.5 km) with a sensitivity of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} = 0.01. In addition to oscillation physics, the reactor experiment may provide interesting measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} at Q{sup 2} = 0, neutrino couplings, magnetic moments, and mixing with sterile neutrino states. {theta}{sub 13} is one of the twenty-six parameters of the standard model, the best model of electroweak interactions for energies below 100 GeV and, as such, is worthy of a precision measurement independent of other considerations. A reactor experiment of the proposed sensitivity will allow a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} with no ambiguities and significantly better precision than any other proposed experiment, or will set limits indicating the scale of future experiments required to make progress. Figure 1 shows a comparison of the sensitivity of reactor experiments of different scales with accelerator experiments for setting limits on sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the mixing angle is very small, or for making a measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the angle is observable. A reactor experiment with a 1% precision may also resolve the degeneracy in the {theta}{sub 23} parameter when combined with long-baseline accelerator experiments. In combination with long-baseline measurements, a reactor experiment may give early indications of CP violation and the mass hierarchy. The combination of the T2K and Nova long-baseline experiments will be able to make significant measurements of these effects if sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.05 and with enhanced beam rates can improve their reach to the sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub ...
Date: October 28, 2004
Creator: Abouzaid, E.; Anderson, K.; Barenboim, G.; Berger, B.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BWR AXIAL PROFILE

Description: The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Huffer, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Components Using Electromagnetic Model-Based Sensors

Description: In this Phase I SBIR, the contractor demonstrated a number of capabilities of model-based sensors such as MWM sensors and MWM-Arrays. The key results include (1) porosity/microstructure characterization for anodes, (2) potential for cathode material characterization, (3) stress measurements in nickel and cobalt, and (4) potential for stress measurements in non-magnetic materials with a ferromagnetic layer. In addition, potential applications for manufacturing quality control of nonconductive layers using interdigitated electrode dielectrometers have been identified. The results indicate that JENTEK's MWM technology can be used to significantly reduce solid oxide fuel cell production and operating costs in a number of ways. Preliminary investigations of solid oxide fuel cell health monitoring and scale-up issues to address industry needs have also been performed.
Date: December 28, 2004
Creator: Zilberstein, Vladimir; Craven, Chris & Goldfine, Neil
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced ST Plasma Scenario Simulations for NSTX

Description: Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high {beta} and high {beta}{sub N} inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high-beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current-drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high {beta} for flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal start-up and plasma current ramp-up. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral-beam (NB) deposition profile, and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD [current drive] deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal-MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with {beta} {approx} 40% at {beta}{sub N}'s of 7.7-9, I{sub P} = 1.0 MA, and B{sub T} = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H{sub 98(y,2)} = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations.
Date: October 28, 2004
Creator: Kessel, C.E.; Synakowski, E.J.; Gates, D.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Kaye, S.M.; Mau, T.K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Cumulant-based Analysis of Nonlinear Magnetospheric Dynamics

Description: Understanding magnetospheric dynamics and predicting future behavior of the magnetosphere is of great practical interest because it could potentially help to avert catastrophic loss of power and communications. In order to build good predictive models it is necessary to understand the most critical nonlinear dependencies among observed plasma and electromagnetic field variables in the coupled solar wind/magnetosphere system. In this work, we apply a cumulant-based information dynamical measure to characterize the nonlinear dynamics underlying the time evolution of the Dst and Kp geomagnetic indices, given solar wind magnetic field and plasma input. We examine the underlying dynamics of the system, the temporal statistical dependencies, the degree of nonlinearity, and the rate of information loss. We find a significant solar cycle dependence in the underlying dynamics of the system with greater nonlinearity for solar minimum. The cumulant-based approach also has the advantage that it is reliable even in the case of small data sets and therefore it is possible to avoid the assumption of stationarity, which allows for a measure of predictability even when the underlying system dynamics may change character. Evaluations of several leading Kp prediction models indicate that their performances are sub-optimal during active times. We discuss possible improvements of these models based on this nonparametric approach.
Date: January 28, 2004
Creator: Johnson, Jay R. & Wing, Simon
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of The Magnetic Field in a Spherical Torus Plasma via Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Harmonic Overlap Measurement of The Magnetic Field in a Spherical Torus Plasma via Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Harmonic Overlap

Description: Measurement of the magnetic field in a spherical torus by observation of harmonic overlap frequencies in the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) spectrum has been previously suggested [V.F. Shevchenko, Plasma Phys. Reports 26 (2000) 1000]. EBW mode conversion to X-mode radiation has been studied in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade spherical torus, [T. Jones, Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, 1995] with emission measured at blackbody levels [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) article no. 165001]. Sharp transitions in the thermally emitted EBW spectrum have been observed for the first two harmonic overlaps. These transition frequencies are determined by the magnetic field and electron density at the mode conversion layer in accordance with hot-plasma wave theory. Prospects of extending this measurement to higher harmonics, necessary in order to determine the magnetic field profile, and high beta equilibria are discussed for this proposed magnetic field diagnostic.
Date: January 28, 2004
Creator: Jones, B.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C. & Munsat, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Workshop on Women of Applied Mathematics: Research and Leadership

Description: We held a two and a half day workshop on Women of Applied Mathematics: Research and Leadership at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, October 8--10, 2003. The workshop provided a technical and professional forum for eleven senior women and twenty-four early-career women in applied mathematics. Each participant committed to an outreach activity and publication of a report on the workshop's web site. The final session of the workshop produced recommendations for future action.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: O'Leary, Dianne P. & Kolda, Tamara G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proposal for a shift register approach to RPC calorimeter readout for test beam, cosmics, and sources.

Description: Resistive Plate Chambers for Hadronic Particle-Flow calorimetry will have a large number of pixels. We present tests of a system for readout with parallel vertical shift registers, somewhat like that used in CCD imaging. In our case we discriminate on the signal immediately after amplification and shaping, and only shift single bits. We discuss the issues involved in a particular model for using off-the-shelf commercial chips for readout on a moderate scale. We have a 32 channel prototype in operation on an RPC, and we describe tests with the amplifiers etc leading up to this. The prototype is an example of a layout for the chips to be mounted on the readout pad for an RPC to make a thin assembly. Comparisons to other systems are made for cost scaling, modes of operation, etc. This particular implementation uses analog delay instead of a digital pipeline, and has no clock on the board during detector live time. This RPC readout system could be implemented quickly. Production of this system should have minimal start-up costs and minimal start-up times. One advantage of the present system would be to provide readout of large numbers of channels on a short development time scale at low cost. This would allow initial tuning of the reconstruction and analysis software in a test beam before other readout systems are ready. It also provides risk management by development of another technology at small additional cost.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Underwood, D. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Np Behavior in Synthesized Uranyl Phases: Results of Initial Tests

Description: Initial tests were completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for developing a potential mechanism to retard the mobility of neptunium at the Yucca Mountain repository. Neptunium is of concern because of its mobility in the environment and long half life, contributing a large percentage of the potential dose over extended times at the perimeter of the site. The mobility of neptunium could be retarded by associating with uranium mineral phases. The following four uranium mineral phases were examined and are potential secondary phases expected to form as a result of interactions of spent nuclear fuel with the local environment: meta-schoepite, studtite, uranophane, and sodium boltwoodite. The fate of the neptunium was examined in these synthetic experiments.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; McNamara, Bruce K.; Clark, Sue B. & Hanson, Brady D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills

Description: Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented.
Date: July 28, 2004
Creator: Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of Asymmetric Optical Pumping of Ions Accelerating in a Magnetic-field Gradient

Description: We report observations of asymmetric optical pumping of argon ions accelerating in a magnetic field gradient. The signature is a difference in the laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) emission amplitude from a pair of Zeeman-split states. A model that reproduces the dependence of the asymmetry on magnetic-field and ion-velocity gradients is described. With the model, the fluorescence intensity ratio provides a new method of measuring ion collisionality. This phenomenon has implications for interpreting stellar plasma spectroscopy data which often exhibit unequal Zeeman state intensities.
Date: October 28, 2004
Creator: Sun, Xuan; Scime, Earl; Miah, Mahmood; Cohen, Samuel & Skiff, Frederick
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier

Description: This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP phases (P, {mu}, and {sigma}) ...
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Wong, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

Description: The unusual properties and beneficial characteristics of iron phosphate glasses, as viewed from the standpoint of alternative glasses for vitrifying nuclear and hazardous wastes (which contain components that make them poorly suited for vitrification in borosilicate glass), have been investigated by the University of Missouri-Rolla with support from the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP), DOE [DEFG07- 96ER45618]. During the past year, the corrosion resistance of Inconel 690 and 693 coupons submerged in an iron phosphate melt at 1050 C for up to 155 days has been investigated to determine whether iron phosphate glasses could be melted in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) equipped with such electrodes in the same manner as now being used to melt borosilicate glass. Substituting iron phosphate glasses for borosilicate glasses could significantly reduce the time and cost for clean up due to the higher waste loading possible in iron phosphate glass. The iron phosphate melt, which contained 30 wt% of the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW), did not corrode the Inconel 690 to any greater extent than what has been reported for Inconel 690 electrodes in the borosilicate melt in the JHM at the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Furthermore, Inconel 693 appeared to be an even better candidate for use in iron phosphate melts since its corrosion rate (0.7 {micro}m/day) was only about one half that (1.3 {micro}m/day) of Inconel 690. In the past year, the results of the research on iron phosphate glasses have been described in nine technical papers and one report and have been presented at four international and national meetings.
Date: June 28, 2004
Creator: Day, Delbert E. & Kim, Cheol-Woon
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 on the NTS, CAU 516 includes six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) consisting of two septic systems, a sump and piping, a clean-out box and piping, dry wells, and a vehicle decontamination area. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from July 22 through August 14, 2003, with supplemental sampling conducted in late 2003 and early 2004. The potential exposure pathways for any contaminants of concern (COCs) identified during the development of the DQOs at CAU 516 gave rise to the following objectives: (1) prevent or mitigate exposure to media containing COCs at concentrations exceeding PALs as defined in the corrective action investigation plan; and (2) prevent the spread of COCs beyond each CAS. The following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 516: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Alternative 1, No Further Action, is the preferred corrective action for two CASs (06-51-02 and 22-19-04). Alternative 2, Clean Closure, is the preferred corrective action for four CASs (03-59-01, 03-59-02, 06-51-01, and 06-51-03). The selected alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, as well as meeting all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will further eliminate the contaminated media at CAU 516.
Date: April 28, 2004
Creator: U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) has funded research on iron phosphate glasses at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) for the period from September 15, 1996 to September 30, 2004 (DE-FG07-96ER45618). The final report for the initial period from September 15, 1996 to September 14, 2000 (project number 55110) has been submitted previously and can be found at www.osti.gov/em52/final{_}reports/55110.pdf. This final report mainly describes the research conducted during the period from September 15, 2000 to September 30, 2004 (project number 73976)
Date: December 28, 2004
Creator: Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S. & Kim, Cheol-Woon
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models

Description: One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Ellingson, Robert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Component Manufacturing Development for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

Description: NCSX [National Compact Stellarator Experiment] is the first of a new class of stellarators called compact stellarators which hold the promise of retaining the steady state feature of the stellarator but at a much lower aspect ratio and using a quasi-axisymmetric magnetic field to obtain tokamak-like performance. Although much of NCSX is conventional in design and construction, the vacuum vessel and modular coils provide significant engineering challenges due to their complex shapes, need for high dimensional accuracy, and the high current density required in the modular coils due space constraints. Consequently, a three-phase development program has been undertaken. In the first phase, laboratory/industrial studies were performed during the development of the conceptual design to permit advances in manufacturing technology to be incorporated into NCSX's plans. In the second phase, full-scale prototype modular coil winding forms, compacted cable conductors, and 20 degree sectors of the vacuum vessel were fabricated in industry. In parallel, the NCSX project team undertook R&D studies that focused on the windings. The third (production) phase began in September 2004. First plasma is scheduled for January 2008.
Date: October 28, 2004
Creator: Heitzenroeder, P.J.; Brown, T.G.; Chrzanowski, J.H.; Cole, M.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Neilson, G.H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structural Analysis of the NCSX Vacuum Vessel

Description: The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) vacuum vessel has a rather unique shape being very closely coupled topologically to the three-fold stellarator symmetry of the plasma it contains. This shape does not permit the use of the common forms of pressure vessel analysis and necessitates the reliance on finite element analysis. The current paper describes the NCSX vacuum vessel stress analysis including external pressure, thermal, and electro-magnetic loading from internal plasma disruptions and bakeout temperatures of up to 400 degrees centigrade. Buckling and dynamic loading conditions are also considered.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Dahlgren, Fred; Brooks, Art; Goranson, Paul; Cole, Mike & Titus, Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department