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Subjectivity Word Sense Disambiguation

Description: This paper investigates a new task, subjectivity word sense disambiguation (SWSD), which is to automatically determine which word instances in a corpus are being used with subjective senses, and which are being used with objective senses.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Akkaya, Cem; Wiebe, Janyce M. & Mihalcea, Rada, 1974-
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

The Decomposition of Human-Written Book Summaries

Description: In this paper, the authors evaluate the extent to which human-written book summaries can be obtained through cut-and-paste operations from the original book. The authors analyze the effect of the parameters involved in the decomposition algorithm, and highlight the distinctions in coverage obtained for different summary types.
Date: March 2009
Creator: Ceylan, Hakan & Mihalcea, Rada, 1974-
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Topic Identification Using Wikipedia Graph Centrality

Description: This paper presents a method for automatic topic identification using a graph-centrality algorithm applied to an encyclopedic graph derived from Wikipedia. When tested on a data set with manually assigned topics, the system is found to significantly improve over a simpler baseline that does not make use of the external encyclopedic knowledge.
Date: May 2009
Creator: Coursey, Kino High & Mihalcea, Rada, 1974-
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Using Encyclopedic Knowledge for Automatic Topic Identification

Description: This paper presents a method for automatic topic identification using an encyclopedic graph derived from Wikipedia. The system is found to exceed the performance of previously proposed machine learning algorithms for topic identification, with an annotation consistency comparable to human annotations.
Date: May 2009
Creator: Coursey, Kino High; Mihalcea, Rada, 1974- & Moen, William E.
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery

Description: This book presents the first broad look at the rapidly emerging field of data-intensive science, with the goal of influencing the worldwide scientific and computing research communities and inspiring the next generation of scientists. Increasingly, scientific breakthroughs will be powered by advanced computing capabilities that help researchers manipulate and explore massive datasets. The speed at which any given scientific discipline advances will depend on how well its researchers collaborate with one another, and with technologists, in areas of eScience such as databases, workflow management, visualization, and cloud-computing technologies. This collection of essays expands on the vision of pioneering computer scientist Jim Gray for a new, fourth paradigm of discovery based on data-intensive science and offers insights into how it can be fully realized.
Date: October 2009
Creator: Hey, Tony; Tansley, Stewart & Tolle, Kristin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Robocamp: Encouraging Young Women to Embrace STEM

Description: This paper describes the efforts and results of a plan for actively recruiting students to undergraduate computer science and engineering programs at the University of North Texas (UNT). Such recruitment of students is critical to the country's efforts to increase the number of engineering professionals, and is a priority for the Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) Department at UNT.
Date: February 2009
Creator: Akl, Robert G. & Keathly, David
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

Young Latinos Use of Mobile Phones: A Cross-Cultural Study

Description: Article discussing a cross-cultural study designed to analyze how young people, operationalized in this study as people of Latino descent between the ages of 18-25, are using their mobile phone for various applications and what particular gratifications they derive from using the phone.
Date: 2009
Creator: Albarran, Alan B. & Hutton, Brian
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Office of Human Radiation Experiments

Description: This website is the result of a project started in 1994 by the Department of Energy's Office of Human Radiation Experiments. The purpose of the group was to research experiments done to test the effects of radiation on humans and to compile documentation (including photographs, oral histories, declassified documents, and audio/visual clips) about the projects, making them available online in a single place. In addition to the different documentation that was cataloged, the group also published a report discussing the process and result of their research.
Date: November 25, 2009
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Office of Human Radiation Experiments.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department