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Inclusive Hadronic Results at BaBar: ISR and Pentaquark Searches

Description: We present recent measurements of hadronic cross-sections from the BaBar experiment and report preliminary results on searches for pentaquark states. Studies of hadronic cross-sections using initial-state radiation offer promising prospects at BaBar. Many exclusive channels have already been measured, and more are in progress. A fully inclusive analysis should also offer a precise measurement of {Delta}{alpha}{sub QED}{sup Had}. Searches for pentaquark states have so far been negative, but they have served to highlight the potential for the study of charmed and non-charmed baryons at high-luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders.
Date: August 15, 2005
Creator: Berger, Nicolas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The SPEAR3 Vacuum System - An Analysis of the First Two Years of Operation (2004 and 2005)

Description: SPEAR 3, a synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, has been in operation for the past two years. SPEAR 3 was designed to achieve high beam lifetimes while operating at a higher current level than previously achieved with SPEAR 2. Maintaining high electron beam lifetimes within the ring allows users to perform their experiments with a consistent supply of high current synchrotron radiation. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the SPEAR 3 vacuum system's performance during the 2004 and 2005 runs while considering methods to optimize and improve vacuum system conditioning, especially within the pumping system, so that a recommended plan of action can be created for the FY 2006 run. Monitoring the dynamics of the electron beam within the ring can be a difficult task. Pressure data obtained from the gages attached to pumps, temperature data obtained from thermocouples located at various locations around the ring, and beam lifetime projections help to provide some indication of the health of the electron beam, but the true conditions within the beam chamber can only be extrapolated. Data collected from sensors (gauges, thermocouples, etc.) located around the ring can be viewed and extracted from a program created at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) called Historyplot. Manipulation and analysis of data was performed with the commercially available programs Matlab and Excel. The data showed that the beam lifetimes in 2005 were much greater than they were in 2004, but it did not provide a clear indication as to why this occurred. One variable of major importance between the 2004 and 2005 runs is the Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) flash frequency (flashing is the process in which Titanium from filaments within the pump is sublimated onto the wall surfaces of the pump, where it removes gas molecules from ...
Date: December 15, 2005
Creator: Armenta, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of production samples of the scintillators LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce

Description: We report on the evaluation of the performance of two recently developed scintillator materials, LaCl{sub 3}:Ce and LaBr{sub 3}:Ce, at the task of gamma ray spectroscopy. Their performance is compared to a standard scintillator used for gamma ray spectroscopy--a 25 mm diameter 25 mm tall cylinder of NaI:Tl. We measure the pulse height, energy resolution, and full-energy efficiency of production LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and LaCl{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystals of different sizes and geometries for a variety of gamma-ray energies. Using production rather than specially selected crystals will establish whether immediate large-scale use is feasible. The crystal is excited by gamma rays from one of six isotopic sources ({sup 125}I, {sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 22}Na, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co) placed 15 cm away from the scintillator. Our measurements show that both LaCl{sub 3} and LaBr{sub 3} outperform NaI:Tl in almost all cases. They outperform NaI:Tl at all energies for the photopeak fraction and counting rate measurements, and for energy resolution at higher energies (above 200 keV for LaCl{sub 3} and 75 keV for LaBr{sub 3}). The performance of production crystals is excellent and these scintillators should be considered for immediate use in systems where stopping power and energy resolution are crucial.
Date: September 15, 2005
Creator: Choong, Woon-Seng; Derenzo, Stephen E. & Moses, William W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

Description: The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).
Date: March 15, 2005
Creator: Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

Description: The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).
Date: October 15, 2005
Creator: Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

Description: The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).
Date: August 15, 2005
Creator: Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

Description: The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).
Date: December 15, 2005
Creator: Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

Description: The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).
Date: January 15, 2005
Creator: Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

X-ray diffraction characterization of suspended structures for MEMS applications

Description: Mechanical stress control is becoming one of the major challenges for the future of micro and nanotechnologies. Micro scanning X-ray diffraction is one of the promising techniques that allows stress characterization in such complex structures at sub micron scales. Two types of MEMS structure have been studied: a bilayer cantilever composed of a gold film deposited on poly-silicon and a boron doped silicon bridge. X-ray diffraction results are discussed in view of numerical simulation experiments.
Date: September 15, 2005
Creator: Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Lavelle, B.; Rigo, S.; Masri, T.; Bosseboeuf, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

Description: Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.
Date: July 15, 2005
Creator: Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David & Pines, Alexander
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cyclotron resonance and quasiparticles

Description: This introductory paper contains personal perspectives about the importance of cyclotron resonance in forming our modern view of solids. The papers following this one will discuss the discovery, refinements, and some of the latest developments. Although I will touch on some of these subjects, I leave the details to the other authors and in the main focus on the conceptual impact of the work. I propose that it was experiments based on cyclotron resonance which established the quasiparticle concept.
Date: January 15, 2005
Creator: Cohen, Marvin L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical processes in theunsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Heterogeneity andseepage

Description: An understanding of processes affecting seepage intoemplacement tunnels is needed for correctly predicting the performance ofunderground radioactive waste repositories. It has been previouslyestimated that the capillary and vaporization barriers in the unsaturatedfractured rock of Yucca Mountain are enough to prevent seepage underpresent day infiltration conditions. It has also been thought that asubstantially elevated infiltration flux will be required to causeseepage after the thermal period is over. While coupledthermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) changes in Yucca Mountain host rockdue to repository heating has been previously investigated, those THCmodels did not incorporate elements of the seepage model. In this paper,we combine the THC processes in unsaturated fractured rock with theprocesses affecting seepage. We observe that the THC processes alter thehydrological properties of the fractured rock through mineralprecipitation and dissolution. We show that such alteration in thehydrological properties of the rock often leads to local flow channeling.We conclude that such local flow channeling may result in seepage undercertain conditions, even with nonelevated infiltrationfluxes.
Date: July 15, 2005
Creator: Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L. & Spycher, Nicolas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of Hydrogen Bonding in Small Water Clusters with Density Functional Theory Calculations

Description: The unique characteristics of hydrogen bonding have left our understanding of liquid water far from complete in terms of its structure and properties. In order to better describe the hydrogen bond in water, we seek to understand the electronic states which show sensitivity to hydrogen bonding. We investigate the structure of unoccupied valence states by performing X-ray Absorption calculations on water clusters using Density Functional Theory. For each water cluster, studying how valence electronic structure is perturbed by changes in the local hydrogen bonding environment facilitates our description of the hydrogen bond. Also in this framework, we move toward a depiction of local structures in liquid water by comparison to experimental X-ray absorption spectra. We find consistent localization along internal bonds in the electronic structures of pre- and post-edge states for single-donor species. In addition, we propose a molecular orbital bonding-antibonding picture to explain this directional localization from dimer calculations, and show that the pre- and post-edge spectral regions have a resulting relationship.
Date: December 15, 2005
Creator: Wendlandt, Johanna
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle-In-Cell Simulations of a Nonlinear Transverse Electromagnetic Wave in a Pulsar Wind Termination Shock

Description: A 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to investigate the propagation of a large-amplitude, superluminal, nearly transverse electromagnetic (TEM) wave in a relativistically streaming electron-positron plasma with and without a shock. In the freestreaming, unshocked case, the analytic TEM dispersion relation is verified, and the streaming is shown to stabilize the wave against parametric instabilities. In the confined, shocked case, the wave induces strong, coherent particle oscillations, heats the plasma, and modifies the shock density profile via ponderomotive effects. The wave decays over {approx}> 10{sup 2} skin depths; the decay length scale depends primarily on the ratio between the wave frequency and the effective plasma frequency, and on the wave amplitude. The results are applied to the termination shock of the Crab pulsar wind, where the decay length-scale ({approx}> 0.05''?) might be comparable to the thickness of filamentary, variable substructure observed in the optical and X-ray wisps and knots.
Date: August 15, 2005
Creator: Skjaeraasen, Olaf; Melatos, A. & Spitkovsky, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Constraints on Short Gamma-Ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

Description: We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at {approx}2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type Ic hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or Ic SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB.
Date: June 15, 2005
Creator: Hjorth, Jens; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Cost-Effective Low-Permeability Ceramic and Refractory Components for Aluminum Melting and Casting

Description: The primary goal of this project was to develop and validate new classes of cost-effective low-permeability ceramic and refractory components for handling molten aluminum in both melting and casting environments. Three approaches were employed with partial to full success to achieve this goal: (1) Develop materials and methods for sealing surface porosity in thermal-shock-resistant ceramic refractories; (2) Develop new ceramic coatings for extreme service in molten aluminum operations, with particular emphasis on coatings based on highly stable oxide phases; and (3) Develop new monolithic refractories designed for lower-permeability applications using controlled porosity gradients and particle size distributions. The results of the research work and the field tests performed utilizing these three approaches are listed below: (1) It was demonstrated that high-density IR heating could be a tool for altering and sealing the surface porosity of fused silica. However, the process was not very cost-effective. (2) A low-cost glaze composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) similar to that of a DFS tube was identified and was successfully tested for its integrity and adherence to DFS. Although the glaze acted as a barrier between the molten aluminum and the DFS, persistent porosity and crazing within the glaze affected its performance during the reactivity tests, thus acting as an obstacle in scaling up production of this glaze. (3) Pyrotek's XL glaze showed great success in improving the life of the DFS tubes. Pyrotek has reported an increasing market demand for the XL-coated DFS tubes, which exhibit useful lifetimes three times better than those of uncoated tubes. (4) A computer model to optimize particle size distribution for reduced permeability was developed and successfully applied to casting formulations. Silica riser tubes produced using these new formulations have been tested in a commercial aluminum casting facility and have been reported to increase the life ...
Date: December 15, 2005
Creator: Brown, Dale E. & Kadolkar, Puja B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

Description: We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.
Date: May 15, 2005
Creator: KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B. & GLUCKSTERN, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DYNAMIC APERTURE OPTIMIZATION FOR LOW EMITTANCE LIGHT SOURCES.

Description: State of the art low emittance light source lattices, require small bend angle dipole magnets and strong quadrupoles. This in turn creates large chromaticity and small value of dispersion in the lattice. To counter the high linear chromaticity, strong sextupoles are required which limit the dynamic aperture. Traditional methods for expanding the dynamic aperture use harmonic sextupoles to counter the tune shift with amplitude. This has been successful up to now, but is non-deterministic and limited as the sextupole strength increases, driving higher order nonlinearities. We have taken a different approach that makes use of the tune flexibility of a TBA lattice to minimize the lowest order nonlinearities, freeing the harmonic sextupoles to counter the higher order nonlinearities. This procedure is being used to improve the nonlinear dynamics of the NSLS-II lattice.
Date: May 15, 2005
Creator: KRAMER, S. & BENGTSSON, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HARMONIC CAVITY PERFORMANCE FOR NSLS-II

Description: NSLS-II is a 3 GeV ultra-high brightness storage ring planned to succeed the present NSLS rings at BNL. Ultralow emittance combined with short bunch length means that it is critical to minimize the effects of Touschek scattering and coherent instabilities. Improved lifetime and stability can be achieved by including a third-harmonic RF cavity in the baseline design. This paper describes the required harmonic RF parameters and the expected system performance.
Date: May 15, 2005
Creator: BLEDNYKH, A.; KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; ROSE, J.; TOWNE, N. & WANG, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

Description: The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.
Date: May 15, 2005
Creator: BLEDNYKH, A. & WANG, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CONTROL OF DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES.

Description: A summary of how modern analytical and numerical techniques enable one to construct a realistic model of state-of-the-art synchrotron light sources is provided. The effects of engineering tolerances and radiation are included in a self-consistent manner. An approach for utilizing these tools to develop an effective strategy for the design and control of the dynamic aperture for such dynamical systems is also outlined.
Date: May 15, 2005
Creator: BENGTSSON, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF A VARIABLE POLARIZATION SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATOR AT THE NSLS.

Description: In this paper a new concept for a planar, superconductive, variable polarization undulator (VPU) is presented. Advantage of this design include: (1) electrical tunability for both right and left circular and elliptical, as well as linear vertical or horizontal, (2) it requires no compensation of unwanted vertical field component and (3) used only simple windings of superconductive wire in an interlaced pattern. The construction of the device is described and compared with a permanent magnet VPU with the same gap and period, as well as with previously published concepts.
Date: May 15, 2005
Creator: CHOUHAN, S.; HARDER, D.; RAKOWSKY, G. & AL., ET
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments on the Nuclear Interactions of Pions and Electrons

Description: This is the final technical report. Yearly Progress Reports were submitted throughout the duration of the project. Along with our publications, these reports provide a detailed record of our accomplishments. This report largely consists of a summary of the technical activities carried out during last 2-1/2 years of the project, along with a list of papers published in the period from 2002-2005. Our work during this period involved the following: 1. Electro-production of excited states of the nucleon through the analysis of exclusive single pion production reactions induced by polarized electrons incident on both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. (JLab) 2. Measurement of proton and deuteron spin structure functions in and above the nucleon resonance region at low and moderate $Q^2$, using inclusive electron-proton and electron deuteron scattering (JLAB). 3. Contributions to the PRIMEX experiment (JLab). 4. A precise measurement of the branching ratio for pion beta decay was carried out along with other members of the PIBETA collaboration (PSI). The first three, labeled JLab, were experiments made with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA. The PIBETA experiment was carried out using a low energy pion beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland.
Date: April 15, 2005
Creator: Minehart, Ralph C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department