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Equity implications of utility energy conservation programs

Description: This paper uses the Residential Energy Consumption Survey undertaken by the Energy Information Administration in 1990 to estimate the statistical association between household income and participation in electric utility energy conservation programs and the association between participation and the electricity consumption. The results indicate that utility rebates, energy audits, load management programs and other conservation measures tend to be undertaken at greater frequency by high income households than by low income households. Participants in conservation programs tend to occupy relatively new and energy efficient residences and undertake conservation measures other than utility programs, which suggests that utility sponsored programs are substitutes for other conservation investments. Electricity consumption during 1990 is not significantly less for households participating in utility programs than for nonparticipants, which also implies that utility conservation programs are displacing other conservation investments. Apparently, utility programs are not avoiding costs of new construction and instead are transferring wealth, particularly to high income participating households.
Date: March 15, 1994
Creator: Sutherland, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The FEL development at the Advanced Photon Source.

Description: Construction of a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) based on the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation is nearing completion at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) with initial experiments imminent. The APS SASE FEL is a proof-of-principle fourth-generation light source. As of January 1999 the undulator hall, end-station building, necessary transfer lines, electron and optical diagnostics, injectors, and initial undulatory have been constructed and, with the exception of the undulatory, installed. All preliminary code development and simulations have also been completed. The undulator hall is now ready to accept first beam for characterization of the output radiation. It is the project goal to push towards fill FEL saturation, initially in the visible, but ultimately to W and VUV, wavelengths.
Date: March 15, 1999
Creator: Arnold, N. D.; Benson, C.; Berg, S.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S. G.; Chae, Y. C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE AND RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

Description: Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. They are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, slag must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to perform a series of tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed prior to the end of this reporting period, 12/31/98. This compares with 16 tests required in the original project plan. Combustor tests in early 1997 with high (37%) ash, Indian coal confirmed that high slag mass flow rates of about 500 lb/hr resulted in retention in the slag of up to 20% of the injected sulfur content mineral matter. To further increase the slag flow rate, rice husks, which contain 20% ash, and rice husk char, which contain 70% ash, were co-fired with coal in the combustor. A series of 13 combustor tests were performed in fourth quarter of 1997 and a further 6 tests were performed in January 1998 and in the summer of 1998. The test objective was to achieve slag flow rates between 500 and 1,000 lb/hr. Due to the very low bulk density of rice husk, compared to pulverized coal, almost the entire test effort focused on developing methods for feeding the rice husks into combustor. In the last test of December 1997, a peak mineral matter, injection rate of 592 lb/hr was briefly achieved by injection of coal, rice husk char, gypsum, and limestone into the combustor. However, no significant sulfur ...
Date: March 15, 1999
Creator: Zauderer, Dr. Bert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

Description: Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.
Date: March 15, 1999
Creator: MAKENAS, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preparation and Properties of Nitrate-Deficient Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions

Description: Because of the high neutron absorption cross sections of some gadolinium isotopes, gadolinium salts in solution are used to control nuclear reactivity in aqueous systems. The present studies concern the preparation and analysis of nitrate-deficient solutions, the effect of time and gamma radiation on their stability, and the determination of the solubility of gadolinium hydroxide in H2O and D2O.
Date: March 15, 2001
Creator: Baumann, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Technical Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER15473 “Molecular Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis”

Description: The production of enantiomerically pure chiral compounds is of great importance in the pharmaceutical industry. Although processes involving chiral catalysis and separations involving solid surfaces are known, the molecular-scale details of these processes are not well understood. This lack of understanding strongly limits the development of new chiral processes. Our collaborative research effort examines several intertwined aspects of chirality and enantioselectivity at catalytically active metal surfaces. At Carnegie Mellon, our efforts focus on the development of chirally imprinted metal powders as materials for chiral columns and the experimental and theoretical study of small chiral molecules adsorbed on well-characterized metal surfaces, both achiral and chiral. These efforts are being performed in close collaboration with our team members at the University of California Riverside and the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.
Date: March 15, 2007
Creator: Sholl, David & Gellman, Andrew
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Post-Cleaning Solids Samples from the 2H Evaporator Pot

Description: Samples retrieved from the 2H Evaporator Pot in October of 2003 were of a similar nature as previous materials. The bulk of the sample was comprised of a sodium aluminosilicate phase, cancrinite. The concentration of uranium in the evaporator solids,however, was very low:less than 0.1 percentage weight. The uranium enrichment was depleted as expected and measured 0.6 percent. These data agree with uranium contents generated during experimental testing. Additionally, the overall specific radionuclide content is lower for this sample than previous measured on samples from the Gravity Drain Line in 1997 and the cone and wall in 2000.
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: WILMARTH, WILLIAM
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

Description: OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used ...
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: Lawson, Dr. Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT

Description: This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.
Date: March 15, 2005
Creator: Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Temperature Components of Magma-Related Geothermal Systems: An Experimental and Theoretical Approach

Description: This summarizes select components of a multi-faceted study of high temperature magmatic fluid behavior in shallow, silicic, volcano-plutonic geothermal systems. This work built on a foundation provided by DOE-supported advances made in our lab in understanding the physics and chemistry of the addition of HCI and other chlorides into the high temperature regions of geothermal systems. The emphasis of this project was to produce a model of the bolatile contributions from felsic magmatic systems to geothermal systems
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: Candela, Philip A. & Piccoli, Philip M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anomalous creep in Sn-rich solder joints

Description: This paper discusses the creep behavior of example Sn-rich solders that have become candidates for use in Pb-free solder joints. The specific solders discussed are Sn-3.5Ag, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu, Sn-0.7Cu and Sn-10In-3.1Ag, used in thin joints between Cu and Ni-Au metallized pads.
Date: March 15, 2002
Creator: Song, Ho Geon; Morris, John W., Jr. & Hua, Fay
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

Description: Matlab is a matrix manipulation language originally developed to be a convenient language for using the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. What makes Matlab so appealing for accelerator physics is the combination of a matrix oriented programming language, an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capability, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of software toolboxes for accelerators have been written in Matlab--the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for machine simulations, LOCO for accelerator calibration, Matlab Channel Access Toolbox (MCA) for EPICS connections, and the Middle Layer. This paper will describe the ''middle layer'' software toolbox that resides between the high-level control applications and the low-level accelerator control system. This software was a collaborative effort between ALS (LBNL) and SPEAR3 (SSRL) but easily ports to other machines. Five accelerators presently use this software. The high-level Middle Layer functionality includes energy ramp, configuration control (save/restore), global orbit correction, local photon beam steering, insertion device compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction, response matrix measurement, and script-based programs for machine physics studies.
Date: March 15, 2005
Creator: Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff & Terebilo, Andrei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Contamination, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 of the NTS, CAU 528 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Corrective Action Unit 528 was created to address the presence of PCBs around the Test Cell C concrete pad. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 24, 2003, through January 8, 2004. The PCBs and total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel range organics were identified as contaminants of concern in the surface and shallow subsurface soils in 12 areas (Areas 1 through 12) at CAS 25-27-03. Based on the review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the NTS, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; Alternative 3 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. The three corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. Alternative 3 is the preferred corrective action for CAS 25-27-03. The selected alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated for closure of the sites and additionally to minimize potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 528.
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessing materials (''Getters'') to immobilize or retard the transport of technetium through the engineered barrier system at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository

Description: Current performance assessment calculations show that technetium (Tc) and neptunium (Np) will deliver the major fraction of the radiation dose to the accessible environment from the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Therefore, materials that can immobilize or delay the transport of Tc or Np (getters) are being considered for addition to either the waste-package or the backfill adjacent to the waste-package. Of the two radionuclides, Tc presents the greater challenge in identifying a suitable getter material. This report identifies several materials that warrant further consideration for immobilizing and/or sorbing Tc as additives to the backfill, and recommends active carbon and an inorganic oxide for initial testing. Other materials, such as zero valent iron, might be useful as getters if they were placed in the waste package itself, a subject that merits further investigation.
Date: March 15, 1999
Creator: Viani, B E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Evaluation of the Potential for Creep of 3013 Inner Can Lids

Description: This report provides the technical basis to conclude that creep induced deformation of Type 304L austenitic stainless steel can lids on inner 3013 containers will be insignificant unless the temperature of storage exceeds 400 C. This conclusion is based on experimental literature data for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel and on a phenomenological evaluation of potential creep processes.
Date: March 15, 2005
Creator: KERRY, DUNN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical and morphological changes at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl interfaces and their relationship to scale adhesion

Description: Ni-(40,50)at%Al alloys with different C and S contents were oxidized at 1000-1150 C for various times in oxygen. Auger electron microscopy was used to study the interface chemistry after scale spallation in ultra high vacuum. The interfacial failure stresses were determined with a tensile pull tester and they were related to the interfacial pore density. Results show that sulfur did not segregate to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni50Al interface even after extended oxidation times. Small amounts, however, segregated to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni40Al interface. The difference in behavior may be related to the surface energy difference between Ni50Al and Ni40Al. On the interfacial void faces of Ni50Al, C first segregated, then it was replaced by S after longer oxidation times; the amount of segregants varied with different crystallographic orientation of the void face. On Ni40Al, S segregated much earlier on the void faces due to a faster diffusion rate in the Ni-rich NiAl. The apparent S diffusivity in Ni50Al and Ni40Al at 1000 C was determined to be 10{sup -9} and 6 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/s respectively. Excess sulfur in Ni40Al greatly increased the interfacial pore density. Preliminary results on interfacial failure stress showed that it decreased with increasing pore density, regardless of whether S was present at the interface, indicating that the major detrimental effect of S on scale adhesion may be to enhance interfacial pore formation.
Date: March 15, 2003
Creator: Hou, Peggy Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

Description: MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times, and ...
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: Medley, S.S.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Andre, R.; Bell, R.E.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1 Outreach, Education and Domestic Market Enhancement 2 Export Promotion and Assistance

Description: Geothermal Energy Association supports the US geothermal industry in its efforts to bring more clean geothermal energy on-line throughout the world. Activities designed to accomplish this goal include: (1) developing and maintaining data bases, web pages, (2) commissioning of special studies and reports, (3) preparing, printing and distributing brochures and newsletters, (4) developing exhibits and displays, and participating in trade shows, (5) designing, producing and disseminating audio-video materials, (6) monitoring and coordinating programs carried out by US DOE and other Federal agencies, (7) holding workshops to facilitate communication between researchers and industry and to encourage their recognition of emerging markets for geothermal technology, (8) attending conferences, making speeches and presentation, and otherwise interacting with environmental and other renewable energy organizations and coalitions, (9) hosting events in Washington, DC and other appropriate locations to educate Federal, State and local representatives, environmental groups, the news media, and other about the status and potential of geothermal energy, (10) conducting member services such as the preparation and distribution of a member newsletter related to operating and maintaining s useful and viable association, and (11) performing similar kinds of activities designed to inform others about geothermal energy. The activities of the export promotion aim to assist industry in accomplishing the goal of successfully penetrating and developing energy in country with existing geothermal resources and a desire to develop them. Activities including in export promotion are: (1)needs analysis and assessment involve monitoring the progress of developing markets and projects overseas and working with US industry to determine what future activities by GEA would be of greatest assistance, (2) outreach includes the preparation and dissemination of brochures and videos for foreign professionals, officials and decision-makers as well as presentations of information of the geothermal technology and the capabilities of the US geothermal industry, (3) Market conditioning involves ...
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: Geothermal Energy Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

Description: Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: Brevick, Jerald; Mount-Campbell, clark & Mobley, Carroll
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity

Description: The idea of using nuclear fusion as a source of commercial electrical power has been pursued worldwide since the 1950s. Two approaches, using magnetic and inertial confinement of the reactants, are under study. This paper describes the difference between the two approaches, and discusses in more detail the heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion concept. A multibeam induction linear accelerator would be used to bring {approx}100 heavy ion beams to a few GeV. The beams would then heat and compress a target of solid D-T. This approach is unique among fusion concepts in its ability to protect the reaction chamber wall from neutrons and debris.
Date: March 15, 2004
Creator: Celata, C.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department