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Special Analysis: Update of Disposal of Cement-Stabilized Encapsulated Waste at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

Description: This Special Analysis for Components-in-Grout (CIG) expands the list of isotopes to the full suite of normal isotopes. This revision also addresses selected isotopes in special waste forms from the K and L basin resin that have waste-specific Kds and high-concentration I-129 wastes with waste-specific Kds, including Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) activated carbon vessels. The full suite of normal isotopes was first screened using the Slit Trench screening results as a conservative approach. The isotopes that survived the screening were analyzed to determine the appropriate CIG inventory limits. The groundwater modeling was revised to incorporate improvements and changes in other recent Special Analyses and Unreviewed Disposal Question (UDQ) evaluations. The air pathway analysis was modified to consider a distributed source rather than a point source. These changes are discussed below in intruder and groundwater sections. Tables and figures are provided in appendices that are directly related to the most recent analyses. Changes to inventory limits are shown in Table 7. Inventory limits for solubility- limited radionuclides require special treatment as discussed in Section 3.1.1.3. U-238 and Pu-239 were analyzed as being solubility-limited, because otherwise they would consume excessive amounts of their inventory limits. Other U and Pu isotopes were not analyzed as being solubility- limited because they would not consume excessive amounts of inventory limits. Current and projected inventories for the K and L basin resins are compared against inventory limits for a single set of 5 CIG trenches. Projections for the K and L basin waste are through 2035, thus actual inventory consumption is dependent on the total number of CIG trenches excavated and filled through 2035. Current inventory for three ETF activated carbon vessels awaiting disposal are compared against inventory limits for a single set of 5 CIG trenches.
Date: October 15, 2003
Creator: Collard, L.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio in Soudan 2.

Description: We have measured the flavor ratio of ratios (R) in atmospheric neutrino interactions using a 1.52 kton-year exposure of Soudan 2. We find R = 0.67 {+-} 0.15{sub {minus}0.06}{sup +0.04}. This value is about 2{sigma} from the expected value of 1.0 and is consistent with the anomalous ratios measured by the Kamiokande and IMB experiments. We note that since our acceptance matrix is different from those of the water Cherenkov experiments we would not expect to measure the same value of R, unless R=1.
Date: October 15, 1997
Creator: Goodman, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Selecting Compositions for Phase 1 of the Product Consistency Test (PCT) Assessment Study

Description: The purpose of this task is to generate the glass property/composition data and model necessary for enhancing operational processing windows. This effort is intended to be both generally applicable to all Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses and specific to individual waste processing plants such as the DWPF and the planned High-Level and Low Activity Waste (HLW and LAW) plants at Hanford. Phase 1 consists of determining the glass compositional region where the existing durability model is not dependable in identifying durable glasses. Phase 2 will be devoted to developing a method of ensuring that durable glass compositions are not excluded from processing.
Date: October 15, 2002
Creator: Cozzi, A.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulant flowsheet test with modified solvent for cesium removal using caustic-side solvent extraction.

Description: A modified solvent has been developed at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) for a caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) process that removes cesium (Cs) from Savannah River Site (SRS) tank waste. The modified solvent was evaluated using the same CSSX flowsheet, SRS simulant, and 33-stage minicontactor (2-cm centrifugal contactor) that had been used to test the previous CSSX solvent. As with the previous solvent, the key process goals were achieved: (1) the Cs was removed from the waste with decontamination factors greater than 40,000 and (2) the recovered Cs was concentrated by a factor of 15 in dilute nitric acid. Thus, the modified CSSX solvent can be used in place of the previous solvent while maintaining satisfactory hydraulic performance and still achieving process requirements at the bench scale.
Date: July 15, 2002
Creator: Leonard, R. A.; Aase, S. B.; Arafat, H. A.; Conner, C.; Falkenberg, J. R.; Regalbuto, M. C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

WebDB Component Builder - Lessons Learned

Description: Oracle WebDB is the easiest way to produce web enabled lightweight and enterprise-centric applications. This concept from Oracle has tantalized our taste for simplistic web development by using a purely web based tool that lives nowhere else but in the database. The use of online wizards, templates, and query builders, which produces PL/SQL behind the curtains, can be used straight ''out of the box'' by both novice and seasoned developers. The topic of this presentation will introduce lessons learned by developing and deploying applications built using the WebDB Component Builder in conjunction with custom PL/SQL code to empower a hybrid application. There are two kinds of WebDB components: those that display data to end users via reporting, and those that let end users update data in the database via entry forms. The presentation will also discuss various methods within the Component Builder to enhance the applications pushed to the desktop. The demonstrated example is an application entitled HOME (Helping Other's More Effectively) that was built to manage a yearly United Way Campaign effort. Our task was to build an end to end application which could manage approximately 900 non-profit agencies, an average of 4,100 individual contributions, and $1.2 million dollars. Using WebDB, the shell of the application was put together in a matter of a few weeks. However, we did encounter some hurdles that WebDB, in it's stage of infancy (v2.0), could not solve for us directly. Together with custom PL/SQL, WebDB's Component Builder became a powerful tool that enabled us to produce a very flexible hybrid application.
Date: February 15, 2000
Creator: Macedo, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing of Continuous Sampling Air-ICP and Mercury Systems as Continuous Emission Monitors at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory

Description: This report has been prepared to document the performance of the continuous sampling reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy) and mercury-monitor systems developed by Ames Laboratory for use as continuous emission monitors (CEM). This work was funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology, through the Mixed Waste Focus Area. The purpose of the project is to develop instrumentation and methods for spectroscopic field monitoring applications. During FY00 this included continued work on the development of the continuous sample introduction system and the multi-frequency AOTF-echelle spectrometer, used in conjunction with the reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES system as a multi-metal CEM. The assembly, development, and testing of an echelle spectrometer system for the detection of mercury (Hg) by atomic absorption was also completed during FY00. The continuous sampling system and the multi-metal air-ICP and mercury-monitor CEM systems were tested at Mississippi State University at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at the end of FY00. This report describes the characteristics and performance of these systems, and the results of the field tests performed at DIAL.
Date: March 15, 2001
Creator: Baldwin, D.P.; Bajic, S.J.; Eckels, D.E.; Zamzow, D.S.; Miller, G.P.; Tao, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

Description: This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the configuration ...
Date: October 15, 2001
Creator: Kremer, Dr. Gregory; Bayless, Dr. David J.; Vis, Dr. Morgan; Prudich, Dr. Michael; Cooksey, Dr. Keith & Muhs, Dr. Jeff
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

Description: This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on ...
Date: October 15, 2002
Creator: Kremer, Dr. Gregory; Bayless, Dr. David J.; Vis, Dr. Morgan; Prudich, Dr. Michael; Cooksey, Dr. Keith & Muhs, Dr. Jeff
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A DEVELOPMENT OF ON-LINE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT INSTRUMENTATION FOR GASIFICATION PROCESS CONTROL

Description: This progress report covers continuing work to develop a temperature probe for a coal gasifier. A workable probe design requires finding answers to crucial questions involving the probe materials. We report on attempts to answer those questions. We previously reported an apparent anomaly in the high-temperature behavior of fused-silica optical components. This time, we report on further anomalies in other components. These unexpected results impede or prevent acquiring data related to the project. The commercial manufacturer of gasifier probes had agreed to lend us three ceramic inner sheaths and one outer sheath for experimentation. He subsequently sent us one inner sheath. We designed a test fixture to be used in a proposed test of phosphor material in a reducing environment at a power company's test facility. Funding delays outside our control caused a related project to be put on hold. Because the two projects shared travel funds, we are unable to continue experimental work until funding resumes. Meanwhile, we are doing some of the labor-intensive data reduction for our recent calibration curves.
Date: November 15, 2001
Creator: Noel, Bruce W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of Modeling for the Prevention of Solids Formation During Canyon Processing of Legacy Nuclear Materials

Description: This report describes the effort to develop a predictive model of the stability of aqueous solutions of nuclear materials will enable the avoidance of concentrations that may cause salts to precipitate. Therefore, for the processing of off-normal material, the risk of producing unwanted solids that require processing to stop will be reduced. Processing delays result in higher operating costs. In addition, the improved model may reduce the work scope for future flowsheet development by identifying the concentration of dissolver solutions that avoid the precipitation of salts. As an initial impact, the improved INEEL model should reduce costs for the processing of difficult-to-dissolve residues from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site by shortening the time it takes to determine dissolving solutions. As a long-term impact, this model should improve schedules to dissolve other off-normal nuclear materials and process aqueous solutions that are stored throughout the DOE complex.
Date: October 15, 2003
Creator: Rhodes, W.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

Description: Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Additional field tests have been performed. It is found that the drilling power can be used as a supplementary method for detecting voids/fractures and rock interfaces.
Date: January 15, 2003
Creator: Peng, Syd S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructure Development and Characteristics of Semisolid Aluminum Alloys

Description: A drop forge viscometer was employed to investigate the flow behavior under very rapid compression rates of A357, A356 diluted with pure aluminum and Al-4.5%Cu alloys. The A357 alloys were of commercial origin (MHD and SIMA) and the rheocast, modified A356 and Al-4.5Cu alloys were produced by a process developed at the solidification laboratory of MIT.
Date: May 15, 2001
Creator: Flemings, Merton & Viswanathan, srinath
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MAPPING INDUCED POLARIZATION WITH NATURAL ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS FOR EXPLORATION AND RESOURCES CHARACTERIZATION BY THE MINING INDUSTRY

Description: In this first quarter we made an organizational change in the project that should allow us to more easily meet the project milestones. This change consists of designing a new systems that will allow to simplify field operation and reduce survey costs. The new system design has been completed and we are in the process of completing the manufacture and test of the first prototype. Production of the final system for the survey should be completed by end of July. The new acquisition and processing software is in progress and will be ready by the end of July. The new processing software will include the robust processing developed by Larsen and Egbert.
Date: April 15, 2001
Creator: Nichols, Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 37, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI (PART 2).

Description: The second part of the sixth RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) meeting was held on November 15, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previous meetings have elaborated on the new generation of proton spin-structure studies (e.g. gluon polarization and flavor separation of q and {bar q} polarizations via real W{sup {+-}} production) enabled by studying polarized proton collisions at energies and momentum transfers where perturbative QCD models are expected to be applicable. The focus of this meeting was on many of the experimental issues that must be resolved to achieve these physics goals. This summary is written with the benefit of hindsight following the completion of the first-ever run of a polarized proton collider. This first run can be considered as a successfully completed milestone of the RHIC Spin Collaboration. Other milestones remain important. Long term machine items were identified in Waldo Mackay's talk, the most important being the completion of the spin rotator magnets that will be installed in 2002 to allow the flexible orientation of the proton beam polarization at the PHENM and STAR experiments. At the meeting Waldo discussed a stronger partial snake magnet for the AGS as a means of producing highly polarized proton beams to inject into RHIC. Developments subsequent to this meeting suggest that a superconducting helical dipole magnet may be feasible for the AGS, and is likely to be needed to achieve the 70% beam polarization in RHIC. Longer term items were also presented, including potential increases in luminosity by the addition of electron cooling to RHIC and the possibility of increasing the collision energy by {approx}20% by replacement of the DX magnets. These items could be considered for a second generation of RHIC spin experiments. The other topics covered at the meeting were related to polarimetry and to the absolute calibration of the proton ...
Date: November 15, 2001
Creator: Bland, L. & Saito, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED Studies

Description: We investigate the atomic structure of the fivefold surface of an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe alloy, using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and a special dynamical low energy-electron diffraction (LEED) method. STM indicates that the step heights adopt (primarily) two values in the ratio of tau, but the spatial distribution of these two values does not follow a Fibonacci sequence, thus breaking the ideal bulk-like quasicrystalline layer stacking order perpendicular to the surface. The appearance of screw dislocations in the STM images is another indication of imperfect quasicrystallinity. On the other hand, the LEED analysis, which was successfully applied to Al-Pd-Mn in a previous study, is equally successful for Al-Cu-Fe. Similar structural features are found for both materials, in particular for interlayer relaxations and surface terminations. Although there is no structural periodicity, there are clear atomic planes in the bulk of the quasicrystal, some of which can be grouped in recurring patterns. The surface tends to form between these grouped layers in both alloys. For Al-Cu-Fe, the step heights measured by STM are consistent with the thicknesses of the grouped layers favored in LEED. These results suggest that the fivefold Al-Cu-Fe surface exhibits a quasicrystalline layering structure, but with stacking defects.
Date: April 15, 2001
Creator: Cai, T.; Shi, F.; Shen, Z.; Gierer, M.; Goldman, A.I.; Kramer, M.J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field Performance of a Slimline Turbomist Evaporator under Southeastern U. S. Climate Conditions

Description: A recent study of evaporation technologies for treating F- and H-area groundwater contaminated with radionuclides and metals (Flach 2002) suggested that spray evaporation might be a viable alternative or supplemental technique for managing tritiated groundwater at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The particular technology of interest in this study is the Slimline Manufacturing Ltd. Turbo-Mist Evaporator, which uses a powerful blower and high-pressure spray nozzles to propel a fine mist into the air at high air and water flowrates.
Date: December 15, 2003
Creator: Sappington, F.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration Facilities for NIF

Description: The calibration facilities will be dynamic and will change to meet the needs of experiments. Small sources, such as the Manson Source should be available to everyone at any time. Carrying out experiments at Omega is providing ample opportunity for practice in pre-shot preparation. Hopefully, the needs that are demonstrated in these experiments will assure the development of (or keep in service) facilities at each of the laboratories that will be essential for in-house preparation for experiments at NIF.
Date: June 15, 2000
Creator: Perry, T. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of data from a downhole oil/water separator field trial in east Texas.

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) is interested in promoting new technologies that can produce oil and gas at a lower cost or with enhanced environmental protection at a reasonable cost. Several years ago, DOE became aware of a new technology for produced water management known as a downhole oil/water separator (or DOWS). A DOWS system separates oil from water at the bottom of a production well and injects the water directly to a disposal zone without lifting it to the surface. DOWS technology offered three potential advantages over traditional pumping systems. First, DOWS were reported to reduce the volume of produced water brought to the surface. Second, the volume of oil produced often increased. Third, because large volumes of produced water were not being lifted to the surface past drinking water zones and subsequently reinjected downward past the same drinking water zones, there was less opportunity for contamination of those zones.
Date: August 15, 2002
Creator: Veil, J. A. & Langhus, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

Description: The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.
Date: May 15, 2001
Creator: Ritherdon, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report to the Department of Energy: Green Schools Project DE-FC01-99EE10685. Schools for the 21st century: Transferring the Green Schools experience

Description: This report describes five major activities that the Alliance to Save Energy performed for the years 2000 and 2001 to support and compliment DOE's Energy Smart Schools Partnership. The major tasks under this project were to: (1) Promote the School Efficiency Peer Exchange program for school personnel; (2) develop the Earth Apple Awards program and disseminate the best award-winning ideas; (3) link Green Schools with Rebuilt with at least one metropolitan area such as Philadelphia or Buffalo; (4) support Rebuild/Energy Smart Schools through working at the state level to develop business, state, and local government and through making presentations in support of school efficiency; (5) update the curriculum search originally conducted in 1995.
Date: January 15, 2002
Creator: Harrigan, Merrilee
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microchannel Heat Exchangers with Carbon Dioxide

Description: The objective of the present study was to determine the performance of CO{sub 2} microchannel evaporators and gas coolers in operational conditions representing those of residential heat pumps. A set of breadboard prototype microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was developed and tested. The refrigerant in the heat exchangers followed a counter cross-flow path with respect to the airflow direction. The test conditions corresponded to the typical operating conditions of residential heat pumps. In addition, a second set of commercial microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was tested for a less comprehensive range of operating conditions. The test results were reduced and a comprehensive data analysis, including comparison with the previous studies in this field, was performed. Capacity and pressure drop of the evaporator and gas cooler for the range of parameters studied were analyzed and are documented in this report. A gas cooler performance prediction model based on non-dimensional parameters was also developed and results are discussed as well. In addition, in the present study, experiments were conducted to evaluate capacities and pressure drops for sub-critical CO{sub 2} flow boiling and transcritical CO{sub 2} gas cooling in microchannel heat exchangers. An extensive review of the literature failed to indicate any previous systematic study in this area, suggesting a lack of fundamental understanding of the phenomena and a lack of comprehensive data that would quantify the performance potential of CO{sub 2} microchannel heat exchangers for the application at hand. All experimental tests were successfully conducted with an energy balance within {+-}3%. The only exceptions to this were experiments at very low saturation temperatures (-23 C), where energy balances were as high as 10%. In the case of evaporators, it was found that a lower saturation temperature (especially when moisture condensation occurs) improves the overall heat transfer coefficient significantly. However, under such conditions, ...
Date: September 15, 2001
Creator: Zhao, Y.; Ohadi, M.M. & Radermacher, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Canister Cleaning System Final Design Report Project A-2A

Description: Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. The Canister Cleaning System (CCS) is part of the Debris Removal Project. The CCS will be installed in the KW Basin and operated during the fuel removal activity. The KW Basin has approximately 3600 canisters that require removal from the basin. The CCS is being designed to ''clean'' empty fuel canisters and lids and package them for disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility complex. The system will interface with the KW Basin and be located in the Dummy Elevator Pit.
Date: June 15, 2000
Creator: FARWICK, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department