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Historic Water-Level Changes and Pumpage from the Principal Aquifers of the Memphis Area, Tennessee: 1886-1975

Description: Abstract: Annual pumpage for both the Memphis Sand ("500-foot" sand) and Fort Pillow Sand ("1400-foot" sand) from the time of initial pumping from these aquifers to 1975 is presented in both tabular and graphic forms . The Memphis Sand supplied 188 million gallons per day in 1975 or 95 percent of the total water used in the area . Pumpage from the Fort Pillow Sand has decreased in recent years and in 1975 was about 4 million gallons per day. Pumping increases from the Memphis Sand have caused an almost continual decline of water levels as shown by graphs , tables, and a series of potentiometric-surface maps. Water-level-change maps show the fluctuations in water levels for two periods of high water use. Water levels in the Fort Pillow Sand are also shown by tables and graphs and a potentiometric-surface map . These graphs illustrate a rise of water levels since 1963, coincidental with pumping reductions. The data presented suggest that a constant pumping rate will cause little water-level decline and that the water levels can be altered for efficient resource management by areally varying the distribution of pumping . The references listed support the information presented in this report .
Date: May 1976
Creator: Criner, James H. & Parks, William S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department