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Adolescent Assertiveness: Standardization of an Instrument and a Comparison Between Alternative School Students and Traditional Public School Students

Description: This study concerned standardization and refinement of an instrument to measure assertiveness in adolescents, and use of that instrument to compare alternative-school students with each other and with students in a traditional school. Most instruments measuring assertiveness are normed on white adult populations. Of the few designed for adolescents, only the Adolescent Assertiveness Discrimination Test provides a tripartite breakdown of subject responses into aggressive, passive, and assertive responses. The test is unpublished and is in the process of standardization and refinement. Multiple linear regression procedures were used to test the three hypotheses. Each hypothesis was tested four times on different groups (alternative versus traditional school students; dropouts versus disciplinary referrals) and on different instruments (AADT; A Scale). Hypothesis 1, which stated that demographic variables, and their interactions with school group, were related to assertiveness, was not supported. Hypothesis 2, which stated that the demographic variables were related to assertiveness, was not supported. Investigations into which of the demographic variables singly contributed to assertiveness showed that gender was significant. Females scored higher on the AADT and males scored higher on the A Scale. Hypothesis 3, which stated that school group was related to assertiveness, was supported on all comparisons except between dropouts and disciplinary referrals on the A Scale. Traditional school students scored higher on the AADT, and alternative school students scored higher on the A Scale. However, of all groups, dropouts scored highest on the AADT.
Date: May 1979
Creator: Reece, Randi S.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Recidivism and Institutional Adjustment of Institutionalized Male Juvenile Delinquents Involved in a Vocational Training Program

Description: The basic purpose of this study was to investigate if placement in a cottage designated solely for juveniles involved in vocational training significantly improved the institutional adjustment and recidivism rate of institutionalized male juvenile delinquents. An additional purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of an involvement in a vocational training program on institutional and post release adjustment of institutionalized juvenile delinquents. Statistical analysis of the data supported the basic hypothesis that subjects who were involved in the vocational training, regardless of cottage placement, would adjust better to the institution. The two groups of vocational subjects had fewer admissions to the Discipline Cottage and a greater frequency of achievement of privilege-level status than did the group of subjects who did not receive vocational training. The hypothesis that vocational subjects who were housed in a separate cottage would adjust better to the institution than would the vocational subjects who were housed in the regular cottages was also supported. The vocational subjects who were housed separately had fewer escapes, fewer admissions to the Discipline Cottage, and a greater frequency of attainment of privilege-level status than either of the other two groups. The analysis also supported the hypothesis that recidivism rates would not be differentially affected by an involvement in the vocational program, regardless of the cottage placement.
Date: May 1979
Creator: White, Jerry D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Long-Term Effects of Play Therapy

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the long-term effects of play therapy on social contacts, self-esteem, school-related behavior patterns, level of academic functioning, attitude toward school, and family relations. There were no significant differences between the group out of play therapy one to six years and the group out of play therapy six to ten years on social contact, self-esteem, school-related behavior patterns, or level of academic functioning. Statistically significant differences occurred at the .05 level of significance concerning the effects of time on home and family relations, with subjects in the six- to ten-year group perceiving more independence while parents in the one to six years group perceived more recreational activity occurring in the family. There were no significant differences between play therapy and non-play therapy children on social contact, self-esteem, school-related behavior patterns, or level of academic functioning. There were statistically significant differences at the .05 level of significance on home and family relations, with subjects one to six years out of play therapy perceiving more organization in their homes than their evaluation-only counterparts, while parents of the group one to six years out of play therapy perceived significantly more cohesion than did parents in the evaluation-only comparison group. In the opposite direction, parents of the group one to six years since evaluation valued more goal-oriented behavior than did their play therapy counterparts. There were also statistically significant differences in the six- to ten-year category on home and family relations. Subjects in the category six to ten years out of play therapy perceived more independence in their homes, while their non-play therapy counterparts perceived more family recreational activity occurring. Between-group differences occurred on cohesion, expressiveness, and moral-religious emphasis, with non-play therapy subjects and parents disagreeing on these values significantly more than their play therapy ...
Date: May 1979
Creator: Carns, Michael R., fl. 1979-
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Parent Group Counseling as Compared to Individual Parent Consultation in Changing Parent Attitude and Child Behavior

Description: The problem of this study concerns the effects of a parent group counseling procedure and an individual consultation procedure upon (1) the attitude of the parents, (2) the school-related behavior of the children, (3) the academic grades of the children, (4) the peer relations of the children, and (5) self-concept of the children. The results of this investigation indicated no significant differences in procedures for affecting behavior changes on the variables examined. Generally, parent group counseling appeared to generate more pervasive changes affecting multiple behaviors in their children than individual consultation with the parents.
Date: May 1979
Creator: Carns, Ann Worrell
Partner: UNT Libraries