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The Eelworm Disease of Wheat and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The eelworm disease of wheat, long known in Europe, has been found during the past year causing considerable damage in Virginia and in isolated localities in West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and California. Every effort should be made to control the trouble in these infested regions, to prevent its further spread, and to find other localities where the disease may exist. The disease may be recognized on young and old plants and in the thrashed wheat by the descriptions given in this bulletin. The trouble may be controlled by use of clean seed, by crop rotation, and by sanitation. If clean seed cannot be procured from uninfested localities, diseased seed can be made safe for planting by the salt-brine treatment here described." -- p. 2
Date: 1920
Creator: Byars, Luther P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rhodes Grass

Description: Revised edition. "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dodder

Description: Report discussing the weed commonly known as dodder or love vine and methods for controlling it. If procedures are properly followed, eradication of the weed in the United States is possible. Topics include varieties of dodder and plants that susceptible to attack by it, its life cycle, and ways it is unintentionally introduced to farms.
Date: 1921
Creator: Hansen, A. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

California Oak Worm

Description: "The live oak and the valley oak, which are characteristic of the landscape of central California, often are stripped of their leaves by a dark-striped worm which is the young stage of a light-brown moth. Besides stripping the trees of their leaves and making the owner think that they are dead, the worm crawls on lawns, walks, fences, and into houses, swimming pools, etc., becoming a general nuisance.... This bulletin describes and illustrates the worm and its work, tells about its habits and natural enemies, and explains the methods of control." -- p. 2
Date: 1920
Creator: Burke, H. E. (Harry Eugene), 1878-1963 & F. B. (Frank Barnes) Herbert, 1890-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Sugar-Beet Nematode in the Western States

Description: "The sugar-beet nematode is one of the most serious of the beet pests. It appears to have been imported with some shipments of beet seed many years ago. It has been found widely scattered in four of the western sugar-beet States and probably exists in other States where beets have been grown for several years. The sugar-beet nematode is the cause of a great deal of loss to the beet grower through reduction of his tonnage, and of a corresponding amount of loss to the sugar producer through reduction of the output of sugar. This bulletin treats of the nature and distribution of the sugar-beet nematode, indicates the most probable means by which this pest is spread, and suggests preventive measures and practical means of control." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Thorne, Gerald, 1890-1975 & Giddings, L. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department